List of serial killers by number of victims

List of serial killers by number of victims
A serial killer is a person who murders two or more people, in two or more separate events over a period of time, for primarily psychological reasons.[1] There are gaps of time between the killings, which may range from a few hours to many years. This list shows serial killers from the 20th century to present day by number of victims (list of serial killers before 1900). In many cases, the exact number of victims assigned to a serial killer is not known, and even if that person is convicted of a few, there can be the possibility that he/she killed many more. Due to the complex nature of serial killers, their crimes, discrepancies caused by geographic location and/or time, and the investigations related to these persons results in difficulties in organization and ranking. To address this, multiple categories have been provided in order to more accurately describe the nature of certain serial murders.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_serial_killers_by_number_of_victims

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10 Serial Killers you probably haven’t heard of Serial killers are a menace to society today. There are literally hundreds if not thousands active at this moment, all over the world. They hunt, stalk and kill their prey just as easily as a cat would a bird. They seem to have no emotion, no remorse, no guilt and no feelings about killing others, other than they like it and it’s addictive to them. That’s what makes them so dangerous! It’s getting to the point where as a tourist in certain countries you have to be extremely careful. Loren Mosher Loren Richard Mosher (September 3, 1933, Monterey – July 10, 2004, Berlin)[2][3] was an American psychiatrist,[3][4]:21 clinical professor of psychiatry,[2][5][6] expert on schizophrenia[5][6] and the chief of the Center for Studies of Schizophrenia in the National Institute of Mental Health (1968–1980).[2][3][5] Mosher spent his professional career advocating for humane and effective treatment for people diagnosed as having schizophrenia[3] and was instrumental in developing an innovative, residential, home-like, non-hospital, non-drug treatment model for newly identified acutely psychotic persons.[2]

List of rampage killers This is a partial list of rampage killings. It is further divided into several subsections. This list shall contain every case with at least one of the following features: Rampage killings with six or more dead (excluding the perpetrator)Rampage killings with at least four people killed and a double digit number of victims (dead plus injured)Rampage killings with at least a dozen victims (dead plus injured) In the tables that follow, the "W" column indicates the weapon, or weapons, used. Details are listed in the Annotation section. Eric Rudolph Eric Robert Rudolph (born September 19, 1966), also known as the Olympic Park Bomber, is responsible for a series of anti-abortion and anti-gay-motivated bombings across the southern United States between 1996 and 1998, which killed two people and injured 111 others. The Federal Bureau of Investigation considers him a terrorist.[1] As a teenager Rudolph was taken by his mother to a Church of Israel in 1984; it is connected to the Christian Identity movement, that believes whites are God's chosen people. He has confirmed religious motivation, but denied racial motivation for his crimes. He spent five years on the FBI Ten Most Wanted Fugitives list until he was caught in 2003.

The Pact (2012 film) Nicole Barlow (Bruckner) is finalizing preparations for her mother's funeral at her childhood home. Her sister, Annie (Lotz) does not want to come down for it, reminding Nicole of the way their mother used to treat them. Nicole tries to contact her cousin, Liz (Perkins) and her daughter Eva (Bright) via video call. After losing the connection, Nicole sees an open door, leading into a dark room and walks inside. Annie arrives, having been informed that Nicole is missing, and finds Nicole's phone along with a photo. Maricopa County Sheriff's Office controversies The Maricopa County Sheriff's Office (MCSO) is a law enforcement agency in Maricopa County, Arizona that has been involved in many controversies since 1995. It is the largest sheriff's office in Arizona state and provides general-service and specialized law enforcement to unincorporated areas of Maricopa County, serving as the primary law enforcement for unincorporated areas of the county as well as incorporated cities within the county who have contracted with the agency for law-enforcement services. It also operates the county jail system.

Gunfight at the O.K. Corral Despite its name, the gunfight actually occurred in a narrow lot six doors west of the rear entrance to the O.K. Corral on Fremont Street, and also in the street. The two opposing parties were initially only about 6 feet (1.8 m) apart. FBI Ten Most Wanted Fugitives On May 19, 1996, Leslie Isben Rogge became the first person on the FBI Ten Most Wanted Fugitives list to be apprehended due to the Internet. The FBI Ten Most Wanted Fugitives is a most wanted list maintained by the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). The list arose from a conversation held in late 1949 between J. Edgar Hoover, Director of the FBI, and William Kinsey Hutchinson,[1] International News Service (the predecessor of the United Press International) Editor-in-Chief, who were discussing ways to promote capture of the FBI's "toughest guys".

Psychopathy Hervey M. Cleckley, a US-American psychiatrist, probably influenced the initial diagnostic criteria for antisocial personality reaction/disturbance in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), as did American psychologist George E. Partridge.

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