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List of serial killers by number of victims

List of serial killers by number of victims
A serial killer is a person who murders two or more people, in two or more separate events over a period of time, for primarily psychological reasons.[1] There are gaps of time between the killings, which may range from a few hours to many years. This list shows serial killers from the 20th century to present day by number of victims (list of serial killers before 1900). In many cases, the exact number of victims assigned to a serial killer is not known, and even if that person is convicted of a few, there can be the possibility that he/she killed many more. Due to the complex nature of serial killers, their crimes, discrepancies caused by geographic location and/or time, and the investigations related to these persons results in difficulties in organization and ranking. To address this, multiple categories have been provided in order to more accurately describe the nature of certain serial murders. Serial killers before 1900 Serial killers with the highest known victim count See also Related:  13/2/7 - 00Crime, Serial Killers & Mass Murderers

Chicks With Guns Photo Book Doesn't Disappoint | Raw File Lindsay McCrum's new photo book Chicks With Guns is just what you think it is: Striking portraits of women with their firearms. What's unexpected, however, is the impact of the photos as a collection. If viewers don't personally know one of these gun-toters, McCrum hopes the book serves as an introduction to a growing community of 15 to 20 million women in the U.S. who own and use guns. “Usually women with guns are turned into comic book characters — Lara Croft, Kill Bill — and I thought it would be fascinating to find out who the real women in our country are who own guns,” she says. After three years and 280 photo shoots, McCrum chose 80 compelling and thoughtful frames for her book. Each photo is accompanied by quotes from the subjects about their history or feelings on gun ownership. For McCrum, Chicks With Guns is not an attempt to enter the ideological debate about guns. “I’m not in the judgment business and the photographs are not policy, nor are they advocacy,” McCrum says. Above:

Eric Rudolph Eric Robert Rudolph (born September 19, 1966), also known as the Olympic Park Bomber, is responsible for a series of anti-abortion and anti-gay-motivated bombings across the southern United States between 1996 and 1998, which killed two people and injured 111 others. The Federal Bureau of Investigation considers him a terrorist.[1] As a teenager Rudolph was taken by his mother to a Church of Israel in 1984; it is connected to the Christian Identity movement, that believes whites are God's chosen people. He has confirmed religious motivation, but denied racial motivation for his crimes. He spent five years on the FBI Ten Most Wanted Fugitives list until he was caught in 2003. In 2005, as part of a plea bargain, Rudolph pleaded guilty to numerous federal and state homicide charges and accepted four consecutive life sentences in exchange for avoiding a trial and a potential death sentence. Early life[edit] Bombings[edit] Fugitive[edit] Arrest and guilty plea[edit] Motivations[edit] Notes[edit]

PDF Converter - Convert to PDF Online Free Meditation, "not-thinking" and speed-reading. : Meditation FBI Ten Most Wanted Fugitives On May 19, 1996, Leslie Isben Rogge became the first person on the FBI Ten Most Wanted Fugitives list to be apprehended due to the Internet. The FBI Ten Most Wanted Fugitives is a most wanted list maintained by the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). The list arose from a conversation held in late 1949 between J. Edgar Hoover, Director of the FBI, and William Kinsey Hutchinson,[1] International News Service (the predecessor of the United Press International) Editor-in-Chief, who were discussing ways to promote capture of the FBI's "toughest guys". This discussion turned into a published article, which received so much positive publicity that on March 14, 1950, the FBI officially announced the list to increase law enforcement's ability to capture dangerous fugitives.[2] Individuals are generally only removed from the list if the fugitive is captured, dies, or if the charges against them are dropped; they are then replaced by a new entry selected by the FBI. See also[edit]

the simple image sharer Which web sites you know that have flawless HTML code for reference and studying? : web_design Albert Fish Hamilton Howard "Albert" Fish[3] (May 19, 1870 – January 16, 1936) was an American serial killer. He was also known as the Gray Man, the Werewolf of Wysteria, the Brooklyn Vampire, the Moon Maniac and The Boogey Man.[4] A child rapist[citation needed] and cannibal, he boasted that he "had children in every state",[4] and at one time, stated the number was about 100. However, it is not known whether he was talking about rapes or cannibalization, less still whether he was telling the truth. He was a suspect in at least five murders during his lifetime. Fish confessed to three murders that police were able to trace to a known homicide, and he confessed to stabbing at least two other people. He was put on trial for the kidnapping and murder of Grace Budd, and was convicted and executed by electric chair.[5][6] Early life[edit] He was born Hamilton Howard Fish in Washington, D.C., on May 19, 1870, to Randall (1795 – October 16, 1875) and Ellen (née Howell; 1838–?) First incarceration[edit]

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