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Philosophy of perception

Philosophy of perception
Do we see what is really there? The two areas of the image marked A and B, and the rectangle connecting them, are all of the same shade: our eyes automatically "correct" for the shadow of the cylinder. The philosophy of perception is concerned with the nature of perceptual experience and the status of perceptual data, in particular how they relate to beliefs about, or knowledge of, the world.[1] Any explicit account of perception requires a commitment to one of a variety of ontological or metaphysical views. Categories of perception[edit] We may categorize perception as internal or external. Internal perception (proprioception) tells us what is going on in our bodies; where our limbs are, whether we are sitting or standing, whether we are depressed, hungry, tired and so forth.External or Sensory perception (exteroception), tells us about the world outside our bodies. The philosophy of perception is mainly concerned with exteroception. Scientific accounts of perception[edit] See also[edit] Related:  Understanding Human Behaviorstudy

Epistemological Problems of Perception First published Thu Jul 12, 2001; substantive revision Sat May 5, 2007 The historically most central epistemological issue concerning perception, to which this article will be almost entirely devoted, is whether and how beliefs about physical objects and about the physical world generally can be justified or warranted on the basis of sensory or perceptual experience—where it is internalist justification, roughly having a reason to think that the belief in question is true, that is mainly in question (see the entry internalist vs. externalist conceptions of epistemic justification). This issue, commonly referred to as “the problem of the external world,” divides into two closely related sub-issues, which correspond to the first two main sections below. 1. What is it that we are immediately or directly aware of in sensory or perceptual experience? 1.1 The idea of immediacy or givenness 1.2 The Sense-Datum Theory Two main arguments have been offered for the sense-datum view.

The Blog : Drugs and the Meaning of Life (Photo by JB Banks) (Note 6/4/2014: I have revised this 2011 essay and added an audio version.—SH) Everything we do is for the purpose of altering consciousness. Drugs are another means toward this end. One of the great responsibilities we have as a society is to educate ourselves, along with the next generation, about which substances are worth ingesting and for what purpose and which are not. However, we should not be too quick to feel nostalgia for the counterculture of the 1960s. Drug abuse and addiction are real problems, of course, the remedy for which is education and medical treatment, not incarceration. I discuss issues of drug policy in some detail in my first book, The End of Faith, and my thinking on the subject has not changed. I have two daughters who will one day take drugs. This is not to say that everyone should take psychedelics. There is no getting around the role of luck here. Huxley was operating under the assumption that psychedelics decrease brain activity.

ParadigmOfComplexity The last few decades have seen the emergence of a growing body of literature devoted to a critique of the so-called “old” or “Cartesian-Newtonian” paradigm which, in the wake of the prodigious successes of modern natural science, came to dominate the full range of authoritative intellectual discourse and its associated worldviews. Often coupled with a materialistic, and indeed atomistic, metaphysics, this paradigm has been guided by the methodological principle of reductionism. The critics of reductionism have tended to promote various forms of holism, a term which, perhaps more than any other, has served as the rallying cry for those who see themselves as creators of a “new paradigm.” At the forefront of such a challenge, and in many ways the herald of the new paradigm, is the relatively new movement of transpersonal psychology. In taking seriously such experiences, transpersonal theory has been compelled to transcend the disciplinary boundaries of mainstream psychology. C.

The Experience and Perception of Time What is ‘the perception of time’? The very expression ‘the perception of time’ invites objection. Insofar as time is something different from events, we do not perceive time as such, but changes or events in time. But, arguably, we do not perceive events only, but also their temporal relations. So, just as it is natural to say that we perceive spatial distances and other relations between objects (I see the dragonfly as hovering above the surface of the water), it seems natural to talk of perceiving one event following another (the thunderclap as following the flash of lightning), though even here there is a difficulty. For what we perceive, we perceive as present—as going on right now. Kinds of temporal experience There are a number of what Ernst Pöppel (1978) calls ‘elementary time experiences’, or fundamental aspects of our experience of time. Duration The inference model may be plausible enough when we are dealing with distant events, but rather less so for much more recent ones.

Life is spiritual. Psychedelics Can Expand Your Consciousness It might seem as though we are all separate, and individual from one another and our environment. While that may appear true and could very well be true in some ways, we are also all connected at the deepest levels of existence. When understanding this, we can look at how we operate daily and begin to ask questions: Why are we so concerned with dominating one another? Why do we strive to be better than others? Why do we chase pieces of paper so that we can have more and more things? Personally I have not done psychedelics so it cannot be completely accurate for me to say exactly what you would feel while doing them. We are all connected. “Psychedelics are illegal not because a loving government is concerned that you may jump out of a third story window. As Terrence McKenna pointed out, psychedelics can lead to vast understandings and expansive changes to ones life that would push them to begin changing how they live life.

Life Can Be A B*tch: The 10 Best Ways To Vent And Clear Your Mind Life can be a bitch. People will frustrate you. Sh*t will come your way that will mess up your plans and demoralize you. The world will not always work in your favor and often at times will seem to be even working against you. Stress is almost certainly unavoidable and can act as a silent killer over time if you are not able to release or disperse of all the negative thoughts and feelings that you have towards your life, the unpleasant situation that you have found yourself in, and yourself. Having a clear mind is having a healthy mind. There are times where our expectations get the better of us and we are let down by the actual results. 1. So you’re no yogi, fair enough. 2. The repetitive motions, the focused, regulated breathing, and the physical exertion makes running an ideal way to remove negative thoughts from your mind. 3. By far my favorite form of venting. 4. Sometimes the best way to clear your thoughts is to get away. 5. If you’re pissed then you may need to sweat it out. 6.

Squeeze light to teleport quantum energy - physics-math - 23 January 2014 Putting the squeeze on light may be the key to teleporting energy across vast distances. Although the amount of energy that could theoretically be transmitted is tiny for now, it could be enough to power quantum computers that don't overheat. For years physicists have been smashing distance records for quantum teleportation, which exploits quantum entanglement to send encrypted information. No physical matter is transmitted, and nothing is travelling faster than light. Physicists have done this with light and with matter, such as entangled ions. Quantum toothpaste Theory has it that a vacuum is not truly empty – it is constantly roiling with tiny fluctuations that cause particles to pop in and out of existence. The quantum field in the vacuum of space is usually at its lowest energy level. Light work To get greater reach, Hotta and his colleagues have now applied a twist to their theory that adds squeezed light to the vacuum. Normally, photons travelling through a vacuum arrive randomly.

Squeeze light to teleport quantum energy - physics-math - 23 January 2014 Putting the squeeze on light may be the key to teleporting energy across vast distances. Although the amount of energy that could theoretically be transmitted is tiny for now, it could be enough to power quantum computers that don't overheat. For years physicists have been smashing distance records for quantum teleportation, which exploits quantum entanglement to send encrypted information. No physical matter is transmitted, and nothing is travelling faster than light. Physicists have done this with light and with matter, such as entangled ions. Quantum toothpaste Theory has it that a vacuum is not truly empty – it is constantly roiling with tiny fluctuations that cause particles to pop in and out of existence. The quantum field in the vacuum of space is usually at its lowest energy level. Light work To get greater reach, Hotta and his colleagues have now applied a twist to their theory that adds squeezed light to the vacuum. Normally, photons travelling through a vacuum arrive randomly.

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