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How PIPA and SOPA Violate White House Principles Supporting Free Speech and Innovation

How PIPA and SOPA Violate White House Principles Supporting Free Speech and Innovation
Over the weekend, the Obama administration issued a potentially game-changing statement on the blacklist bills, saying it would oppose PIPA and SOPA as written, and drew an important line in the sand by emphasizing that it “will not support” any bill “that reduces freedom of expression, increases cybersecurity risk, or undermines the dynamic, innovative global Internet." Yet, the fight is still far from over. Even though the New York Times reported that the White House statement "all but kill[s] current versions of the legislation," the Senate is still poised to bring PIPA to the floor next week, and we can expect SOPA proponents in the House to try to revive the legislation—unless they get the message that these initiatives must stop, now. So let’s take a look at the dangerous provisions in the blacklist bills that would violate the White House’s own principles by damaging free speech, Internet security, and online innovation: The Anti-Circumvention Provision The “Vigilante” Provision Related:  Privacy Free Speech Censorship Rights

Cyber Letters > Lecithin and Ginkgo Biloba Date: April 8, 2004 Jack Wu Golden Creek LLC 5250 East Arapahoe Road F7-225 Littleton, Colorado 80122 Ref. Dear Mr. This is to advise you that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has reviewed your web site at the Internet address and has determined that the products “Lecithin” and “Ginkgo Biloba” being offered are promoted for conditions that cause the products to be drugs under section 201(g)(1) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the Act) [21 USC 321(g)(1)]. Examples of some of the claims observed on your web site include: Ginkgo Biloba (Dr. Lecithin (Dr. Furthermore, FDA has no information that your products are generally recognized as safe and effective for the above referenced conditions and therefore, the products may also be “new drugs” under section 201(p) of the Act [21 USC 321(p)]. FDA is aware that Internet distributors may not know that the products they offer are regulated as drugs or that these drugs are not in compliance with the law.

Electronic Frontier Foundation The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) is an international non-profit digital rights group based in the United States. History[edit] Foundation[edit] In April 1990, Barlow had been visited by a U.S. This generated further reaction and support for the ideas of Barlow and Kapor. The Electronic Frontier Foundation was formally founded on July 10, 1990, by Kapor, Gilmore and Barlow. In 1990, Mike Godwin joined the organization as the first staff counsel. Early cases[edit] The creation of the organization was motivated by the massive search and seizure on Steve Jackson Games executed by the United States Secret Service early in 1990. EFF's second big case was Bernstein v. Expansion and development[edit] In early 2010, EFF released this poster in celebration of its founding 20 years before. The organization was originally located at Mitch Kapor's Kapor Enterprises, Inc offices in Cambridge, Massachusetts. DES Cracker[edit] Activities[edit] Litigation[edit] EFF booth at the 2010 RSA Conference

Dietary Supplements FDA regulates both finished dietary supplement products and dietary ingredients. FDA regulates dietary supplements under a different set of regulations than those covering "conventional" foods and drug products. Under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA): Manufacturers and distributors of dietary supplements and dietary ingredients are prohibited from marketing products that are adulterated or misbranded. This section provides detailed information about: Q&A on Dietary Supplements Frequently asked questions about dietary supplements, including definitions, labeling requirements, and regulatory roles and responsibilities. Ensuring the Safety and Accurate Labeling of Dietary Supplements Although dietary supplement manufacturers must register their facilities with FDA,* they are not required to get FDA approval before producing or selling dietary supplements. Alerts & Safety Information

How to Remove Your Google Search History Before Google's New Privacy Policy Takes Effect [UPDATE 2/22/2012] It is important to note that disabling Web History in your Google account will not prevent Google from gathering and storing this information and using it for internal purposes. More information at the end of this post. On March 1st, Google will implement its new, unified privacy policy, which will affect data Google has collected on you prior to March 1st as well as data it collects on you in the future. Here's how you can do that: 1. 2. 3. 4. Note that removing your Web History also pauses it. [UPDATE 2/22/2012]: Note that disabling Web History in your Google account will not prevent Google from gathering and storing this information and using it for internal purposes. With Web History enabled, Google will keep these records indefinitely; with it disabled, they will be partially anonymized after 18 months, and certain kinds of uses, including sending you customized search results, will be prevented.

Arab Spring The protests have shared some techniques of civil resistance in sustained campaigns involving strikes, demonstrations, marches, and rallies, as well as the effective use of social media[20][21] to organize, communicate, and raise awareness in the face of state attempts at repression and Internet censorship.[22][23] Many Arab Spring demonstrations have been met with violent responses from authorities,[24][25][26] as well as from pro-government militias and counter-demonstrators. These attacks have been answered with violence from protestors in some cases.[27][28][29] A major slogan of the demonstrators in the Arab world has been Ash-sha`b yurid isqat an-nizam ("the people want to bring down the regime").[30] Etymology[edit] The term "Arab Spring" is an allusion to the Revolutions of 1848, which is sometimes referred to as "Springtime of the People", and the Prague Spring in 1968. Background[edit] Causes[edit] Recent history[edit] Overview[edit] Summary of conflicts by country[edit]

Electronic Frontier Foundation Topics Page Latest news from USA TODAY New lab works on security shoe By Kevin Begos, Associated Press PITTSBURGH High-tech security? Forget those irksome digital eye scans. From the Web What you didn’t post, facebook may still know 4h 26m ago Charlotte Observer each third-party data partner’s website. On Deaf Ears the Electronic Frontier Foundation had a post entitled Texas Court Confirms You Can’t Patent Math | Electronic Frontier Foundation. Privacy and electronic tolls on the Golden Gate Bridge 1d 9h ago San Francisco Bay Guardian shift to receive little ink in recent media reports is the privacy implications of the new electronic system. Electronic Frontier Foundation More stories from USA TODAY about > SOPA Thanks to the unprecedented efforts of craigslist users and other concerned citizens this week, movement on PIPA and SOPA has been indefinitely postponed! Word has it that Congress had never before received so many calls and emails regarding any issue whatsoever. Bravo! “This is altogether a new effect,” said former Senator Chris Dodd, now head of MPAA and key PIPA/SOPA promoter, comparing the online movement to the Arab Spring. He had not seen in his 40 years in politics “an effort that was moving with this degree of support change this dramatically.” Ron Paul (R-TX), PIPA applauded the Internet Blackout, saying "Sometimes you need a two-by-four to get them to listen." During the blackout, Team CoCo provided craigslist blackout ad service and part II of same. PIPA and SOPA will likely return, and both are so deeply flawed they must die entirely, so the fight is not over. Tell Congress you OPPOSE Senate 968 "Protect IP Act" (PIPA) and H.R. 3261 "Stop Online Piracy Act" (SOPA):

CNET CNET (stylized as c|net) is an American media website that publishes reviews, news, articles, blogs, podcasts and videos on technology and consumer electronics globally. Founded in 1994 by Halsey Minor and Shelby Bonnie, it was the flagship brand of CNET Networks and became a brand of CBS Interactive through CNET Networks' acquisition in 2008.[2][3][4][5] CNET originally produced content for radio and television in addition to its website and now uses new media distribution methods through its Internet television network, CNET Video, and its podcast and blog networks. In addition CNET currently has region-specific and language-specific editions. These include the United Kingdom, Australia, China, France, Germany, Japan, Korea and CNET en Español. History[edit] Origins[edit] Logo of CNET Networks prior to acquisition by CBS Interactive In addition, CNET produced another television technology news program called News.com that aired on CNBC beginning in 1999.[7] Criticism[edit] Adware[edit] News

Information theory Overview[edit] The main concepts of information theory can be grasped by considering the most widespread means of human communication: language. Two important aspects of a concise language are as follows: First, the most common words (e.g., "a", "the", "I") should be shorter than less common words (e.g., "roundabout", "generation", "mediocre"), so that sentences will not be too long. Such a tradeoff in word length is analogous to data compression and is the essential aspect of source coding. Second, if part of a sentence is unheard or misheard due to noise — e.g., a passing car — the listener should still be able to glean the meaning of the underlying message. Note that these concerns have nothing to do with the importance of messages. Information theory is generally considered to have been founded in 1948 by Claude Shannon in his seminal work, "A Mathematical Theory of Communication". Historical background[edit] With it came the ideas of Quantities of information[edit] Entropy[edit] . that

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