background preloader

Simple mechanisms explained

Simple mechanisms explained
Email Below you’ll find animated diagrams and explanations of how various mechanisms work. Some of these have been crucial to major evolutions in mechanisms and technology, and allow us to do anything from fire weaponry to make cars move with the press of a pedal. Maltese Cross mechanism powers second hand movement in the clock: Radial engines are used in aircraft. Today, however, most aircraft use turbine engines: Reciprocating movements power steam engines in locomotives: Sewing machine: Manual transmission mechanism, also known as “stick shift” is used to change gears in vehicles: This mechanism is called constant-velocity joint and is used in front-wheel drive vehicles: Torpedo-boat destroyer system is used to destroy fleet in naval military operations: The Wankel engine is a type of internal combustion engine which uses a rotary design to convert pressure into a rotating motion instead of using reciprocating pistons: + Bonus – mechanism you can watch forever Leave your comment:

http://www.buzzhunt.co.uk/2009/06/12/simple-mechanisms-explained/

Related:  Randomteaching subjects

Alarming Ring by Meng Fandi Alarming Ring Ring is a vibrating alarm designed for people who hate the loud blaring sounds of a typical alarm. The charging cradle is where you set what time you want each ring to go off. The ring fits over the tip of your finger and when that opportune time arrives, it vibrates. Putting the ring back on the dock shuts off the alarm. Last Drop : Pumping Up Till The Last Drop From The Bottom of A Bottle The Last Drop concept derived from the inconvenience of pumping up the finishing liquid from the bottom of a shampoo or shower gel container to avoid everyday wastage. The bottom of Last Drop container is designed in a way that the finishing liquids are stored in a cone following by slopes both side where the dispenser can easily reach and let the user to have even the last drop of liquid. The container is beautifully designed to enhance the bathroom décor and lets the user to see how much more liquids are left inside.

Body of Christ Tastes Like Ass of Christ! By themselves, communion wafers are pretty vile. That would explain why they have to "sell" them with a free sip of wine. So the purpose of this experiment is to find out just what it takes to turn the communion experience from "ow!" to "wow!" We* went to the supermarket and we selected a range of toppings and condiments to serve eucharists with.

10 Amazing Tricks to Play with your Brain / Mind Mind is the aspect of intellect and consciousness experienced as combinations of thought, perception, memory, emotion, will and imagination, including all unconscious cognitive processes. Mind manifests itself subjectively as a stream of consciousness. Neuroanatomists usually consider the brain to be the pivotal unit of what we refer to as mind. The Human Brain tricks us whenever it can. You don’t actually see what it is in real or you don’t even actually hear or smell the way it should be.

Rosenhan experiment Rosenhan's study was done in two parts. The first part involved the use of healthy associates or "pseudopatients" (three women and five men, including Rosenhan himself) who briefly feigned auditory hallucinations in an attempt to gain admission to 12 different psychiatric hospitals in five different states in various locations in the United States. All were admitted and diagnosed with psychiatric disorders. After admission, the pseudopatients acted normally and told staff that they felt fine and had no longer experienced any additional hallucinations. All were forced to admit to having a mental illness and agree to take antipsychotic drugs as a condition of their release.

40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World If you’re a visual learner like myself, then you know maps, charts and infographics can really help bring data and information to life. Maps can make a point resonate with readers and this collection aims to do just that. Hopefully some of these maps will surprise you and you’ll learn something new. A few are important to know, some interpret and display data in a beautiful or creative way, and a few may even make you chuckle or shake your head. If you enjoy this collection of maps, the Sifter highly recommends the r/MapPorn sub reddit.

Futility Closet In 1554 Sir James Hales drowned himself. The coroner returned a verdict of felo de se, meaning that Sir James was guilty of the felony of self-murder. His estate was forfeited to the crown, which planned to award it to one Cyriac Petit. Sir James’ widow, Margaret, contested this. So the case turned on the question whether the grounds for forfeiture had occurred during Sir James’ lifetime: Had his suicide occurred during his life, or after his death? Margaret Hales’ counsel argued that one can’t be guilty of suicide while one is still living, practically by definition, so self-murder shouldn’t be classed as a felony: “He cannot be felo de se till the death is fully consummate, and the death precedes the felony and the forfeiture.”

Molecular secrets of the "iron-plated snail" February 03, 2010 Molecular secrets of the “iron-plated snail” Life isn’t easy for the “scaly-foot gastropod”. Music - Musical Temperaments and Ratios - Phonature Technology Building Guitar Chords : Worked example Local copy, original at www.phonature.com Introduction The fingering for different guitar chords is one of the biggest mysteries in guitar playing.

The 50 Most Perfectly Timed Photos Ever By Internet standards, a perfectly timed photo occurs when two of the following three conditions are met: 1. Perfect Place 2. Perfect Time 3. What's up with Henry Earl? Henry is The Man So there's this guy named Henry Earl. He lives in Lexington, KY. I don't know much about him except that he goes by the name "James Brown", (which is cool in and of itself) and that he likes to get drunk. He likes to get drunk a lot. And he gets busted a lot. Boy discovers microbe that eats plastic It's not your average science fair when the 16-year-old winner manages to solve a global waste crisis. But such was the case at last May's Canada-Wide Science Fair in Ottawa, Ontario, where Daniel Burd, a high school student at Waterloo Collegiate Institute, presented his research on microorganisms that can rapidly biodegrade plastic. Daniel had a thought it seems even the most esteemed PhDs hadn't considered. Plastic, one of the most indestructible of manufactured materials, does in fact eventually decompose. It takes 1,000 years but decompose it does, which means there must be microorganisms out there to do the decomposing.

Related:  Mechanics and Engineeringnewtonian physicsUser Interface / Information accesability