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The Doors of Perception

The Doors of Perception
The Doors of Perception is a short book by Aldous Huxley, first published in 1954, detailing his experiences when taking mescaline. The book takes the form of Huxley's recollection of a mescaline trip that took place over the course of an afternoon, and takes its title from a phrase in William Blake's 1793 poem The Marriage of Heaven and Hell. Huxley recalls the insights he experienced, which range from the "purely aesthetic" to "sacramental vision".[1] He also incorporates later reflections on the experience and its meaning for art and religion. Background[edit] Mescaline (Peyote and San Pedro Cactus)[edit] Mescaline is the principal agent of the psychedelic cactus peyote and San Pedro cactus, which has been used in Native American religious ceremonies for thousands of years.[2] A German pharmacologist, Arthur Heffter, isolated the alkaloids in the peyote cactus in 1891. Peyote as entheogen drug[edit] Research by Humphry Osmond[edit] Huxley's experience with mescaline[edit] Synopsis[edit] Related:  Black Awakening

Aldous Huxley Aldous Leonard Huxley /ˈhʌksli/ (26 July 1894 – 22 November 1963) was an English writer, philosopher and a prominent member of the Huxley family. He was best known for his novels including Brave New World, set in a dystopian London, and for non-fiction books, such as The Doors of Perception, which recalls experiences when taking a psychedelic drug, and a wide-ranging output of essays. Early in his career Huxley edited the magazine Oxford Poetry, and published short stories and poetry. Mid career and later, he published travel writing, film stories and scripts. He spent the later part of his life in the US, living in Los Angeles from 1937 until his death. Huxley was a humanist, pacifist, and satirist. Early life[edit] Huxley began his learning in his father's well-equipped botanical laboratory, then went to Hillside School, Malvern. I believe his blindness was a blessing in disguise. Career[edit] Bloomsbury Set[edit] United States[edit] Post World War II[edit] Association with Vedanta[edit]

Carlos Castaneda Carlos Castañeda cuyo nombre original es Carlos César Salvador Arana Castañeda (Cajamarca, Perú, 25 de diciembre de 1925 — Los Ángeles, 27 de abril de 1998) fue un antropólogo y escritor peruano naturalizado estadounidense, autor de una serie de libros que describirían su entrenamiento en un tipo particular de nahualismo tradicional mesoamericano, al cual él se refería como una forma muy antigua y olvidada. Dichos libros y el propio Castañeda, quien en escasas ocasiones hablaba en público acerca de su obra o de si mismo, son objeto de mucha controversia. Sus partidarios afirman que sus libros son veraces en su contenido, o que al menos constituyen obras de valor literario y antropológico. Sus críticos señalan por el contrario que sus libros son una farsa, trabajos de ficción, y que no son verificables como obras de antropología, al contrario de lo que el autor afirmaba. Sus primeros libros están ligados a la psicodelia y la contracultura de fines de los años 60 y 70. Biografía[editar]

The Internet map Alice Bailey Alice Ann Bailey (June 16, 1880 – December 15, 1949) was a writer and theosophist in occult teachings, "esoteric" psychology and healing, astrological and other philosophic and religious themes. Bailey was born as Alice LaTrobe Bateman, in Manchester, England.[1] She moved to the United States in 1907, where she spent most of her life as a writer and teacher. Bailey's works, written between 1919 and 1949, describe a wide-ranging system of esoteric thought covering such topics as how spirituality relates to the solar system, meditation, healing, spiritual psychology, the destiny of nations, and prescriptions for society in general. She described the majority of her work as having been telepathically dictated to her by a Master of Wisdom, initially referred to only as "the Tibetan" or by the initials "D.K. Biography[edit] Childhood and early life[edit] Bailey was born to a wealthy aristocratic British family and, as a member of the Anglican Church, received a thorough Christian education.[5]

Las Puertas de la Percepcción Dion Fortune Dion Fortune born Violet Mary Firth (6 December 1890 – 8 January 1946), was a prominent British occultist, author, psychologist, teacher, artist, and mystic.[1] Schooled in Western Esotericism, she was influential in the modern revival of the magical arts. She was also a prolific writer of the supernatural and the occult in both novels and non-fiction works. As a psychologist, she approached magic and hermetic concepts from the perspectives of Jung and Freud. Known to those in her inner circle as DF, her pseudonym was inspired by her family motto "Deo, non-fortuna" (Latin for "by God, not fate"), originally the ancient motto of the Barons and Earls Digby.[2] Fortune died in 1946 from leukemia in Middlesex, London, at the age of 55. Early life[edit] She joined the Theosophical Society[3] and attended courses in psychology and psychoanalysis at the University of London,[6] and became a lay psychotherapist at the Medico-Psychological Clinic in Brunswick Square.[7] Lectures[edit]

Las Puertas De La Percepción Agnosticism Agnosticism is the view that the truth values of certain claims—especially claims about the existence or non-existence of any deity, as well as other religious and metaphysical claims—are unknown or unknowable.[1][2][3] According to the philosopher William L. Rowe, in the popular sense, an agnostic is someone who neither believes nor disbelieves in the existence of a deity or deities, whereas a theist and an atheist believe and disbelieve, respectively.[2] Thomas Henry Huxley, an English biologist, coined the word agnostic in 1869. However, earlier thinkers have written works that promoted agnostic points of view. These thinkers include Sanjaya Belatthaputta, a 5th-century BCE Indian philosopher who expressed agnosticism about any afterlife,[4][5][6] Protagoras, a 5th-century BCE Greek philosopher was agnostic about the gods.[7] The Nasadiya Sukta in the Rigveda is agnostic about the origin of the universe.[8][9][10] Defining agnosticism[edit] Thomas Henry Huxley said:[11][12] Robert G.

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