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The Very Real Danger of Genetically Modified Foods - Ari LeVaux

The Very Real Danger of Genetically Modified Foods - Ari LeVaux
New research shows that when we eat we're consuming more than just vitamins and protein. Our bodies are absorbing information, or microRNA. Update 1/12: Thanks to science and biology bloggers, Christie Wilcox and Emily Willingham at the Scientific American blog network and The Biology Files, respectively, we've learned of the scientific inconsistencies made in Ari LeVaux's most recent Flash in the Pan column, which is syndicated by a number of newspapers and magazine websites. This column has been expanded and updated for AlterNet, with LeVaux discussing specific improvements in the comments. Chinese researchers have found small pieces of rice ribonucleic acid (RNA) in the blood and organs of humans who eat rice. The Nanjing University-based team showed that this genetic material will bind to receptors in human liver cells and influence the uptake of cholesterol from the blood. The type of RNA in question is called microRNA (abbreviated to miRNA) due to its small size. And: Related:  anonymous

How Genetically Modified Foods Could Affect Our Health in Unexpected Ways | January 11, 2012 | Like this article? Join our email list: Stay up to date with the latest headlines via email. Chinese researchers have found small pieces of rice ribonucleic acid (RNA) in the blood and organs of humans who eat rice. The type of RNA in question is called microRNA (abbreviated to miRNA) due to its small size. Should the research survive scientific scrutiny -- a serious hurdle -- it could prove a game changer in many fields. That knowledge could deepen our understanding of many fields, including cross-species communication, co-evolution, and predator-prey relationships. This study had nothing to do with genetically modified (GM) food, but it could have implications on that front. Monsanto's website states, "There is no need for, or value in testing the safety of GM foods in humans." The Central Dogma resembles the process of ordering a pizza. We've known for decades that the Central Dogma, though basically correct, is overly simplistic. And,

THE CORNUCOPIA INSTITUTE 12/01/12 How Genetically Modified Foods Could Affect Our Health in Unexpected Ways Yet another reason to test GMOs for safety. AlterNet / By Ari LeVaux Chinese researchers have found small pieces of rice ribonucleic acid (RNA) in the blood and organs of humans who eat rice. The Nanjing University-based team showed that this genetic material will bind to receptors in human liver cells and influence the uptake of cholesterol from the blood. The type of RNA in question is called microRNA (abbreviated to miRNA) due to its small size. Should the research survive scientific scrutiny — a serious hurdle — it could prove a game changer in many fields. That knowledge could deepen our understanding of many fields, including cross-species communication, co-evolution, and predator-prey relationships. This study had nothing to do with genetically modified (GM) food, but it could have implications on that front. Monsanto’s website states, “There is no need for, or value in testing the safety of GM foods in humans.” The Central Dogma resembles the process of ordering a pizza. And,

What is MicroRNA? MicroRNAs are a class of post-transcriptional regulators. They are short ~22 nucleotide RNA sequences that bind to complementary sequences in the 3’ UTR of multiple target mRNAs, usually resulting in their silencing. MicroRNAs target ~60% of all genes, are abundantly present in all human cells and are able to repress hundreds of targets each. MicroRNAs were first discovered in 1993 by Victor Ambros, Rosalind Lee and Rhonda Feinbaum during a study into development in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) regarding the gene lin-14. It was only in 2000 when let-7 was discovered to repress lin-41, lin-14, lin28, lin42 and daf12 mRNA during transition in developmental stages in C. elegans and that this function was phylogenetically conserved in species beyond nematodes, that it became apparent the short non-coding RNA identified in 1993 was part of a wider phenomenon. Since then over 4000 miRNAs have been discovered in all studied eukaryotes including mammals, fungi and plants.

GMO SAFETY 05/02/10 RNA interference (RNAi): – a new, pioneering discovery Feb 5, 2010 Basic info Print Send Gene silencing RNA interference is a complex molecular biological mechanism for silencing genes. Used, but not understood. It is just eight years since the two scientists Andrew Fire and Craig Mello discovered the mechanism of RNA interference, for which they have since been awarded the Nobel Prize. Even before the discovery of RNA interference, a method of blocking the activity of genes was known and even used: the antisense technique. Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), which is either introduced into cells artificially or arises from a viral attack, is cleaved into short RNA segments (siRNA) by the Dicer enzyme complex. RNA interference - a natural defence mechanism From then on, research focused on decoding this process. It has subsequently been shown that the mechanism works in almost all higher organisms. Understanding the processes surrounding RNA interference in plants, animals and humans is still the subject of numerous research projects today.

Regulators Discover a Hidden Viral Gene in Commercial GMO Crops by Jonathan Latham and Allison Wilson How should a regulatory agency announce they have discovered something potentially very important about the safety of products they have been approving for over twenty years? In the course of analysis to identify potential allergens in GMO crops, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has belatedly discovered that the most common genetic regulatory sequence in commercial GMOs also encodes a significant fragment of a viral gene (Podevin and du Jardin 2012). Cauliflower Mosaic Virus What Podevin and du Jardin discovered is that of the 86 different transgenic events (unique insertions of foreign DNA) commercialized to-date in the United States 54 contain portions of Gene VI within them. The researchers themselves concluded that the presence of segments of Gene VI “might result in unintended phenotypic changes”. In general, viral genes expressed in plants raise both agronomic and human health concerns (reviewed in Latham and Wilson 2008).

PLoS One. 2012; 7(5): e35389. RNA Interference Is Responsible for Reduction of Transgene Expression after Sleeping Beauty Transp The CaMV promoter story The CaMV promoter story The Biosafety Protocol concluded in Montreal reaffirms the precautionary principle but the problem is one of ensuring that the principle is implemented, as illustrated by the case of the CaMV promoter. The CaMV promoter is a gene-switch from the cauliflower mosaic virus which is incorporated into practically all current GM crops. Recent scientific findings reveal it may be highly unsafe. But many of the scientists themselves are refusing to read the implications of the findings or to draw the right conclusions in accordance with the precautionary principle. By Mae-Wan Ho The CaMV promoter - a recipe for disaster? THIS was the title of a scientific paper co-authored by myself and my colleagues, Angela Ryan from the Open University UK and Prof. We wrote a detailed rebuttal, which was likewise circulated and posted to the same website. Prof. What is a 'promoter'? A 'promoter' is a stretch of genetic material that acts as a switch for turning genes on. Worse

J Virol. 2012 Virus-Derived Gene Expression and RNA Interference Vector for Grapevine

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