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The Very Real Danger of Genetically Modified Foods - Ari LeVaux - Health

The Very Real Danger of Genetically Modified Foods - Ari LeVaux - Health
New research shows that when we eat we're consuming more than just vitamins and protein. Our bodies are absorbing information, or microRNA. Update 1/12: Thanks to science and biology bloggers, Christie Wilcox and Emily Willingham at the Scientific American blog network and The Biology Files, respectively, we've learned of the scientific inconsistencies made in Ari LeVaux's most recent Flash in the Pan column, which is syndicated by a number of newspapers and magazine websites. This column has been expanded and updated for AlterNet, with LeVaux discussing specific improvements in the comments. Chinese researchers have found small pieces of rice ribonucleic acid (RNA) in the blood and organs of humans who eat rice. The type of RNA in question is called microRNA (abbreviated to miRNA) due to its small size. Should the research survive scientific scrutiny -- a serious hurdle -- it could prove a game changer in many fields. The Central Dogma resembles the process of ordering a pizza. And: Related:  anonymous

Top Ed-Tech Trends of 2011: The Higher Education Bubble Part 8 of my Top Ed-Tech Trends Series To Uncollege One of the most interesting people I met this year was Dale Stephens. Dale is just 19, but he's an incredibly intelligent and poised young man. Peter Thiel's Higher Education Bubble It was a simple opening sentence to one of the most-read articles in the tech industry this year. "A true bubble is when something is overvalued and intensely believed, he says. As part of his critique of higher ed, Thiel formed the "20 Under 20" program, paying 20 students under the age of 20 to drop out of school, giving them $100,000 over the course of 2 years to do so. The Dropout Success Story Both Thiel's narrative and his fellowship program are a nod to a powerful piece of Silicon Valley mythology: drop out of college, build your own business, be wildly successful. The Other Kids I've only met 2 of the Thiel fellows: Dale and Andrew Hsu (CEO and co-founder of the educational gaming company Airy Labs). DIY Higher Ed Open Badges

How Genetically Modified Foods Could Affect Our Health in Unexpected Ways | January 11, 2012 | Like this article? Join our email list: Stay up to date with the latest headlines via email. Chinese researchers have found small pieces of rice ribonucleic acid (RNA) in the blood and organs of humans who eat rice. The type of RNA in question is called microRNA (abbreviated to miRNA) due to its small size. Should the research survive scientific scrutiny -- a serious hurdle -- it could prove a game changer in many fields. That knowledge could deepen our understanding of many fields, including cross-species communication, co-evolution, and predator-prey relationships. This study had nothing to do with genetically modified (GM) food, but it could have implications on that front. Monsanto's website states, "There is no need for, or value in testing the safety of GM foods in humans." The Central Dogma resembles the process of ordering a pizza. We've known for decades that the Central Dogma, though basically correct, is overly simplistic. And,

Growing fatter on a GM diet As part of the study, a group of rats were fed corn which had been genetically modified for pest resistance. (Photo: iStockphoto) Since genetically modified (GM) food started to appear in shops in the early nineties, large quantities have been sold for human consumption – without any harmful effects, as far as we know. An international research project is exploring the effects of GM food, studying the impact on rats, mice, pig and salmon. “We are trying to identify which indicators we need to measure in order to explore unintentional effects from GM food,” explains Professor Åshild Krogdahl of the Norwegian School of Veterinary Science. “The findings could give us some understanding of the potential effects for these animal species as well as for humans.” Rats fattening up As part of the project, a group of rats were fed corn which had been genetically modified for pest resistance. “I don't wish to sound alarmist, but it is an interesting phenomenon and worth exploring further.”

A List of Xenoestrogens « Endometriosis Journey A List of Xenoestrogens Posted on Updated on A List of Xenoestrogens Posted on October 20, 2007 by sowgenerously, edited by Endometriosis Journey for redundancy If you are attempting to avoid xenoestrogen exposure, here is a list of substances to avoid. The short answer is to go as organic and “green” as you can. Avoid: Avoid naturally occurring plant estrogens: * Coffee * Clover, red clover tea, alfalfa sprouts * Sunflower seeds * Queen Anne’s lace (wild carrot) * Pomegranate – The Greeks used this plant as a contraceptive! Chemicals: Here is another list from Dr. 1. According to Dr. * Use glass or ceramics whenever possible to store food and water. References:

Jamie Oliver: Victory as McDonald's stops using 'pink slime' in its burger recipe TV chef was disgusted to discover ammonium hydroxide was being used by McDonald's to convert fatty beef offcuts into a beef filler for burgers'Why would any sensible human being want to put ammonia-filled meat into their children's mouths? asked Jamie Oliver McDonald's denies its hand had been forced by TV campaign By Jill Reilly Updated: 11:05 GMT, 27 January 2012 After months of Jamie Oliver campaigning on his hit US television show, McDonald's has abandoned the beef filler from its burger patties After years of trying to break America, Jamie Oliver has finally made his mark by persuading one of the biggest U.S fast food chains in the world to change their burger recipe. McDonald's have altered the ingredients after the Naked Chef forced them to remove a processed food type that he labelled 'pink slime'. The food activist was shocked when he learned that ammonium hydroxide was being used by McDonald's to convert fatty beef offcuts into a beef filler for its burgers in the USA.

khan academy • ESL Techies Why the blended learning model is a good choice One of the latest trends in the education world is blended learning. So what is blended learning and how can it help English Language Learners? The term blended learning has been used in education for many years. In a flipped learning environment, the traditional format of in-class lectures followed by at-home student assignments is turned around or “flipped”. Another objective of this individualized approach is to empower students to direct their own learning by coming to class prepared to ask questions and problem solve with their peers after viewing the subject matter on their own. For English language learners the model has some obvious advantages. The next day, teachers can spend less time lecturing in the front of the room (a la “chalk and talk”) and have more time to spend engaged with students, giving more personalized instruction, while the students use class time to complete tasks alone or collaboratively.

What is MicroRNA? MicroRNAs are a class of post-transcriptional regulators. They are short ~22 nucleotide RNA sequences that bind to complementary sequences in the 3’ UTR of multiple target mRNAs, usually resulting in their silencing. MicroRNAs target ~60% of all genes, are abundantly present in all human cells and are able to repress hundreds of targets each. These features, coupled with their conservation in organisms ranging from the unicellular algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to mitochondria, suggest they are a vital part of genetic regulation with ancient origins. MicroRNAs were first discovered in 1993 by Victor Ambros, Rosalind Lee and Rhonda Feinbaum during a study into development in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) regarding the gene lin-14. Since then over 4000 miRNAs have been discovered in all studied eukaryotes including mammals, fungi and plants. This article is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.

Health - Marion Nestle - Debunking the Health Claims of Genetically Modified Foods In a new book, critics of crop modification take a science-based approach to advocacy. I've just been sent GMO Myths and Truths, a review of research on claims made for the safety and efficacy of genetically modified (GM) foods. The authors are Michael Antoniou, Claire Robinson, and John Fagan, scholars with critical positions on GM foods. I've been writing about GM foods since the mid-1990s, and am impressed by the immutability of positions on the topic. As I discuss in my book Safe Food: The Politics of Food Safety, the pro-GM and anti-GM advocates view the topic in quite different ways that I call for lack of better terms "science-based" versus "value-based." In GMO Myths and Truths, the authors attempt to cross this divide by taking a science-based, heavily referenced approach to dealing with claims for the benefits of GM foods. Whether or not you agree with these conclusions, the authors have put a great deal of time and effort into reviewing the evidence for the claims.

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