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Women, feminism, and geek culture

Women, feminism, and geek culture
[Content Warning: Intimate Partner Violence, workplace harassment, verbal abuse, sexism] Folks who hang out around these parts are probably familiar with our Timeline Of Incidents, which documents sexist behavior in tech and other geek fields. While it’s a great resource, scrolling down through that hall of shame is a poor approximation for what it’s like being a woman having to deal with these incidents in real time. It can be painful. Stressful. Scary.

http://geekfeminism.org/

Related:  CULTURE GEEK ET SEXISME

Greta Christina's Blog This piece was originally published on AlterNet. In a society that reflexively copes with death by using religion, grieving atheists are turning to each other. How do you deal with death -- your own, or that of people you love -- when you don't believe in God or an afterlife? Deep Lab What is Deep Lab? Deep Lab is a collaborative group of cyberfeminist researchers, artists, writers, engineers, and cultural producers. Our interests are diverse, and we do not agree on everything. Some of our research includes privacy, surveillance, code, art, social hacking, race, capitalism, anonymity, the infrastructures of the 21st century and useful skills in tangible situations. What does Deep Lab do? Members of Deep Lab are engaged in ongoing critical assessments of contemporary digital culture, and work together to exploit the potential for creative inquiry lying dormant in the deep web.

Mansplaining I still don't know why Sallie and I bothered to go to that party in the forest slope above Aspen. The people were all older than us and dull in a distinguished way, old enough that we, at 40-ish, passed as the occasion's young ladies. The house in Colorado was great -- if you like Ralph Lauren-style chalets: a rugged luxury cabin at 9,000 feet, complete with elk antlers, lots of kilims, and a wood-burning stove. We were preparing to leave when our host said, "No, stay a little longer so I can talk to you."

In defense of the sanctimonious women's studies set. On Monday night, Donald Trump’s wife Melania touched hearts as she addressed the Republican National Convention, sharing the lessons she learned growing up as a black girl on the South Side of Chicago. As first spotted by journalist Jarrett Hill, Melania’s speech bore more than a passing resemblance to another speech at another convention about eight years ago — Michelle Obama’s 2008 address to the Democratic National Convention. The cribbed portion discussed the values that Michelle and Melania apparently share, including working hard for what you want in life and keeping your word. Read more → I apologize for Feministe’s long, long radio silence, and I hate that this is the occasion to break it. This space is available for discussion of the recent extrajudicial executions of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile.

Interactive Feminist Bingo Card Yeah, that's a troll you've got. Congratulations. You have a few choices at this point. Home Sandrine Ceurstemont, editor, New Scientist TV Thanks for visiting NSTV. This is where you've been finding the best in science videos, from the mysteries of physics and mathematics explained in just 1 minute to eye-watering illusions and mind-bending time-lapses. But now it's time for video to expand throughout our great science coverage. You'll soon be seeing more video than ever on our breaking news stories and on our in-depth long-form features.

Vintage Family Product Ads... Only for Ads Vintage Family Product Ads... Labels: Rare Commercials, Vintage Commercials 0 comments: Presentation Zen There are a ton of storytelling-related books and websites in the cosmos. And there is no shortage of people giving story advice and tips. Much of the advice is helpful, but the enormous volume of information related to writing or telling better stories can be overwhelming. Therefore, when someone credible comes along who offers free, insanely simple yet effective advice for improving one's story, he will find a very large audience indeed. This is exactly what happened just a few years ago, all quite by accident it would seem. In 2011 Comedy Central began shooting a documentary about the process behind the creation of a typical South Park episode.

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