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Today's students need educators to re-envision the role of technology in the classroom. by Nancye Blair Principal, January/February 2012 Web Resources A dramatic shift is sweeping through our schools. The signs are all around us. These are not the same 21st century learners we came to know over the first decade of the new millennium. These new 21st century learners are highly relational and demand quick access to new knowledge. Technology integration Remixed The new 21st century learners must master more than the core curriculum to succeed in secondary and postsecondary institutions, as well as in the workplace. As students develop the four C’s, we have discovered that effective application of these vital skills in a technology-infused life and workplace requires acquiring them in a technology-infused learning environment. In this configuration, the teacher acts as a learning catalyst, orchestrating and facilitating activities that spark defining moments for students.

How to Integrate Technology When technology integration in the classroom is seamless and thoughtful, students not only become more engaged, they begin to take more control over their own learning, too. Effective tech integration changes classroom dynamics, encouraging student-centered project-based learning. Think about how you are using technology with your students. Are they employing technology daily in the classroom, using a variety of tools to complete assignments and create projects that show a deep understanding of content? If your answer is "No," is it because you lack enough access to technology? This article contains the following sections: Handhelds Go to Class: Teacher Josh Barron and one of his students go through the strange-looking rite of "beaming" information to each other. Getting Started The first step in successful tech integration is recognizing the change that may need to happen inside of yourself and in your approach to teaching. Back to Top Integrating Technology Across the Access Spectrum

Best Practices in Technology Integration -- What the Research Says Most instructional technology implementation efforts focus their efforts around a few key areas. In our experience, these areas most often are: As a way of establishing what’s possible or ideal in each of these areas, we find that it’s useful to review how the relevant research describes “best practice”. Concise summaries of the research that defines best practice is presented below. There is also a bibliography for the various reports and papers cited in each section. We'd love feedback and comments on anything that you read here, and you can send us feedback by clicking on this link . Finally, working on the assumption that a picture is worth a thousand words (at least for visual learners), we have highlighted a few video clips from Edutopia (www.edutopia.org) that demonstrate how different educators have implemented elements of these best practices within their schools and districts. Best Practice in Technology Integration back to top Best Practice in Technology Access Bibliography

Educational Technology Publications Badrul Khan interviews visionary leaders from various countries who successfully implemented innovative technology-based educational programs. Book Reviews section: reviews both printed books and books published on the Web. Books on all aspects of the field of educational technology are reviewed. Conference Reports: consisting of articles from important conferences and seminars in the field. The magazine now includes periodical columns by Marc Prensky, Denis Hlynka, Alexander Romiszowski, Michael Bush Susan Patrick and Ellen Rose. In addition, most issues include a biographical study of a significant figure in the history of the field of educational technology, edited by Tom Reeves. Rounding out the new directions for the magazine, its Editors have commissioned numerous special-issue treatments on important developing trends in the field.

New Technologies and 21st Century Skills Carter's Classroom Educational Technology Visit the links below for more information about the work of Texas Education Agency's Educational Technology unit in the Division of Instructional Materials and Educational Technology and statewide educational technology initiatives. Technology Planning and Funding Long-Range Plan for Technology, 2006-2020 2014 Progress Report on the Long-Range Plan for Technology (PDF) School Technology Planning, E-Rate Modernization, and Broadband ConnectivityE-Rate in TexasOnline Technology Plan (ePlan)School Technology and Readiness (STaR) ChartStudy on School District Network Capabilities (TEC Sec. 32.005)Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), Title II, Part D (outside source) Funding and GrantsState Instructional Materials Allotment (IMA) Technology Lending Program Texas Education Agency Grant Opportunities Funding Digital Learning (outside source)Using Federal Funds to Support Transition to Digital Learning (outside source)Federal Grants (outside source)

Why Integrate Technology into the Curriculum?: The Reasons Are Many VIDEO: An Introduction to Technology Integration Running Time: 5 min. Technology is ubiquitous, touching almost every part of our lives, our communities, our homes. Yet most schools lag far behind when it comes to integrating technology into classroom learning. Many are just beginning to explore the true potential tech offers for teaching and learning. Integrating technology into classroom instruction means more than teaching basic computer skills and software programs in a separate computer class. Many people believe that technology-enabled project learning is the ne plus ultra of classroom instruction. The myriad resources of the online world also provide each classroom with more interesting, diverse, and current learning materials. New tech tools for visualizing and modeling, especially in the sciences, offer students ways to experiment and observe phenomenon and to view results in graphic ways that aid in understanding.

Tomorrow's Learning Today: 7 Shifts To Create A Classroom Of The Future Tomorrow’s Learning Today: 7 Shifts To Create A Classroom Of The Future by Terry Heick For professional development around this idea or others you read about on TeachThought, contact us. Let’s take a look at the nebulous idea of the “classroom of the future.” Below are some ideas that are truly transformational–not that they haven’t been said before. And the best part? But therein lies the rub: Tomorrow’s learning is already available, and below are 7 of the most compelling and powerful trends, concepts, and resources that represent its promise. The Challenge of Implementation It’s challenging enough to manage a traditional learning environment where the curriculum is handed to you, and meetings are set, and you’re simply there to manage; adding more ingredients to the mix seems like asking for trouble. The good news is, many of the elements of a progressive learning environment—e.g., digital literacy, connectivism, and play—conveniently, and not coincidentally, work together. 1. 2. 3. 4.

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