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First Class Ice Breakers Using Mobile Devices

First Class Ice Breakers Using Mobile Devices
I previously wrote about the importance of beginning a class focusing on the learners in the room as opposed to the content to be covered in Beginning the School Year: It’s About Connections Not Content. Most classes, starting with about middle school, begin the school year with reviewing the content to be covered, expectations regarding grades, and other academic information provided by the teacher or instructor. The human or social element is often disregarded.What is interesting is that most learners enter the classroom wondering who is in the course. They want to know about the teacher and the people in the class not what material is to be covered. All of my classes, regardless of student age or demographics – elementary gifted students or graduate students, begin with ice-breakers and team-building activities. What follows are several of the mobile-driven ice-breakers I recently used in an undergraduate course on Interpersonal Relations. Cell Sharing Question Selector Like this: Related:  Activities

Elimination games with young learners | Super Simple Learning Blog ♫ One potato, two potatoes… ♫ Many of us remember playing elimination games like Musical Chairs and Simon Says when we were young. These are games where you start with a group, and each round, one or more players is “out” and eliminated from the game. As you get closer and closer to the end of the game, the tension builds, and it can be a lot of fun (and beneficial for young learners). However, for some very young learners, these kinds of elimination games can be very upsetting. There are a few ways to handle this. 1) Demonstrate how to “lose” positively If you do play a game where participants get eliminated, be sure, as the leader, to eliminate yourself first. 2) Make getting “out” fun When a child does get eliminated in the game, give her a high five, let her sit in a special chair, make a silly noise, maybe even give her a sticker. 3) Eliminate the elimination For very young learners, often there is no need to have a winner or any sense of competition to make the activity fun.

Beginning the School Year: It’s About Connections Not Content Most classes, starting with about middle school, begin the school year with reviewing the content to be covered, expectations regarding grades, and other academic information provided by the teacher or instructor. The human or social element is often disregarded. What is interesting is that most learners enter the classroom wondering who is in the course. Because of this belief, I begin all classes focusing on having the students make connections between themselves and me. You are the focus of the class not me.You are important as a learner in this class.You will be expected to engage in the learning activities during class time. Based on age/grade level, I have begun my classes in a variety of ways. Team Contract Class members meet in small groups to develop guidelines for making the classroom a safe place to learn and to take risks. Team Building Games There are tons of team building games that can be used in the classroom. All About Me Activities Some example activities I have done:

Icebreakers Archive | Classroom Icebreaker Activities | Ice Breakers | Back to School | First Day of School Check out these articles on everything from preparing for the first day to dealing with homework woes, coping as a new teacher and ensuring smooth sailing for substitute teachers. Be sure to explore our 12 volumes of icebreakers and first day of school activities that help students and teachers get to know each other. Icebreakers Archive | Classroom Icebreaker Activities Best of the IcebreakersVolume 1: Tell Me About You ActivitiesVolume 2: 14 Activities for the First Days of SchoolVolume 3: Engaging Activities for the First Days of SchoolVolume 4: Activities for the First Day of SchoolVolume 5: All-About-You Activities for the First Days of SchoolVolume 6: Get to Know Your Classmates ActivitiesVolume 7: Getting to Know One AnotherVolume 8: Who's in the Classroom? Tools for Teaching: Starting the New School Year On the first day of school, the first question in students' minds is, "Who are you?" Fun Activities Get the School Year Off to a Good Start! Party! Ten Games for Classroom Fun!

12 ways of creating stories with your EFL students I’ve been reading a fair amount recently about the value of storytelling – and, in particular, the telling of vivid and emotionally-engaging stories – to memory in general, and vocabulary-learning and grammar practice more specifically. It certainly seems that learning new words from a list is a duller and less efficient alternative to acquiring and retaining new vocabulary than involving your learners in narratives using the target words. With this in mind, here are four ways you can involve your learners in creating stories around particular lexical or grammatical themes, and a list (and brief descriptions!) of eight other methods from various corners of this site: Stories from boxesDraw eight rectangles on the board, with space between each one.Invite student volunteers to come and draw one thing, each in a different rectangle. Note: The two ideas above come from Creating Stories with Children by Andrew Wright. Stories from blank paper Show your students a blank sheet of paper.

Question Cup Objectives Icebreakers/Warmups Group Size Small | Medium | Large Materials Index Cards Cup (a Box hat or other container may also be used) Set Up Directions Each member of the group writes a “get to know you” question on an index card and places it folded in a cup. Variation Write out a numbered list of questions. Sample Questions What is the weirdest thing you have ever eaten? Can you help make this activity better?

Warm-up Ideas Warm-ups help your learners put aside their daily distractions and focus on English. If they haven't used English all day, they may take a little while to shift into it. Warm-ups also encourage whole-group participation which can build a sense of community within the group. For new groups, see the list of ice breakers further down. Brainstorm (any level, individual or group) Give a topic and ask learners to think of anything related to it. Write the responses for all to see, or ask a volunteer to do the writing.

The 35 Best Web 2.0 Classroom Tools Chosen By You 100 Web 2.0 Tools Every Teacher Should Know About 44.24K Views 0 Likes We're always trying to figure out the best tools for teachers, trends in the education technology industry, and generally doing our darnedest to bring you new and exciting ways to enhance the classroom. But I wanted t... 20 Free and Fun Ways To Curate Web Content 23.98K Views 0 Likes What's the best way to organize it all into at least some reasonable manner? It’s Time To Crowdsource Your School’s Social Media Policy 12.53K Views 0 Likes Every school has a different policy when it comes to social media. 118 Videos Explaining Each Element In The Periodic Table If you’re a science teacher, you’re going to want to bookmark this as soon as possible. If you’re not a science teacher, heck, you’ll still love this and learn a thing or two. The University of Nottingham has created ‘The Periodic Table of Videos‘ and it’s just what the title would imply. 118 videos that explain each element. Video journalist Brady Haran and working chemists from the University of Nottingham assembled these videos for the world to enjoy. Now, they say they’re going to start improving and beefing up each video with new stories, better samples, and bigger experiments. They also have a new video series, dubbed ‘The Molecular Videos’ which is a showcase of their favorite molecults and compounds.

Icebreakers that Rock We’re coming up fast on the beginning of another school year. That means a new batch of students to get to know, students who need to be made comfortable in your classroom, and who need to get to know each other. It’s essential to start building relationships with your students right from the start. And how to accomplish this? I planned to create a nice big post with dozens of icebreaker ideas you could choose from. They require students to take massive social risks with people they barely know. So I have scrapped my plan to curate good icebreakers from the Internet. In my own classrooms, with middle school, high school, and college students, I have played all three of these games with great success. Each of these will likely sound familiar to you, although the names may not be exactly what you’ve known them as. Blobs and Lines Here are some sample prompts you can use for this game: Concentric Circles Do you play any sports? This or That Sample questions for This or That:

All Things Grammar - Home Free Collaborative Writing Tool No limit 360 FREE Warmers, Ice-Breakers and Fillers For The ESL Classroom Planning a lesson is no easy task, especially if you're about to introduce a difficult topic. Sometimes, you need a little bit of something extra to really make your lesson flow. For this reason, ESL teachers usually use warmers and fillers. The beauty of using warmers and fillers is that very little planning goes into using them. These warmer and filler worksheets can be used in several ways. Another great feature of these warmer/filler worksheets is that most can be used for all levels. Don’t worry about registering or subscribing, since all worksheets on BusyTeacher.org are free to download, and there's no limit to how many you can download! If you have some worksheets of your own that you've found useful in your lessons, why not share them with other ESL teachers to use in their lessons as well? Make BusyTeacher.org your number one online resource for worksheets by bookmarking us today.

Banish Blithering Blabber: 6 Must Have Components to a Perfect Conversation Lesson There is little worse for a teacher than walking away from class feeling as though your lesson has been a flop. It doesn’t happen often, but it does happen. And perhaps the most challenging ESL class to feel good about is conversation class. How do you know if students really got the point of the lesson? 5 Must Have Components to a Perfect Conversation Lesson 1A Clear GoalWhat do you hope to accomplish in your lesson? Feedback- the 6th Element You want to make sure your students know how they did in a conversation lesson. You can feel confident about your conversation class when you make a point of including these six elements. That way you will know what you want to accomplish, you will give your students the tools to accomplish it, and you will see them reach the goal right before your eyes. Enjoyed this article and learned something? Want more teaching tips like this? Get the Entire BusyTeacher Library Warning: only if you're serious about teaching English. Show me sample pages →

A Free Way To Easily Create Your Own Classroom Social Network The following is a sponsored post by Bitrix24 , an easy way to create a social intranet for your school and work groups to collaborate on projects and tasks, get feedback, and keep up to date with communications. The end of August marks back-to-school time, and for most teachers, that means that its time to start managing syllabi, calendars, homework and projects for each class you teach and group you advise. Add in some departmental meetings and school-wide events, and keeping track of it all can get pretty hairy. Time Management 2.0 In this age of Education 2.0, we also have Time Management 2.0. Teachers, administrators, and students are pushed for time as it is, so adding in a large number of ‘useful’ task management tools can be less than helpful sometimes. Bitrix24 is a company that offers cloud-based online collaboration space, which can help teachers, administrators, and even students to keep all of their ducks in a row. How Is It Useful For Teachers, Administrators, and Students?

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