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List of Rainbow Tables

List of Rainbow Tables
This page lists the rainbow tables we generated. LM rainbow tables speed up cracking of password hashes from Windows 2000 and Windows XP operating system. NTLM rainbow tables speed up cracking of password hashes from Windows Vista and Windows 7 operating system. MD5 and SHA1 rainbow tables speed up cracking of MD5 and SHA1 hashes, respectively. The largest rainbow tables here are ntlm_mixalpha-numeric#1-9, md5_mixalpha-numeric#1-9 and sha1_mixalpha-numeric#1-9. Each has a key space of 13,759,005,997,841,642 (i.e., 253.6). Benchmark result of each rainbow table is shown in last column of the list below. Video demonstration of some rainbow tables on Perfect rainbow tables are rainbow tables without identical end points, produced by removing merged rainbow chains in normal rainbow tables. Rainbow Tables LM Rainbow Tables NTLM Rainbow Tables MD5 Rainbow Tables SHA1 Rainbow Tables Table Generation, Sort and Conversion Commands

http://project-rainbowcrack.com/table.htm

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Penetration Testing: Tools and Software Penetration Testing Defined There is a considerable amount of confusion in the industry regarding the differences between vulnerability scanning and penetration testing as the two phrases are commonly interchanged. However, their meaning, and implications are very different. A vulnerability assessment simply identifies and reports noted vulnerabilities, whereas a penetration test attempts to exploit the vulnerabilities to determine whether unauthorized access or other malicious activity is possible. Penetration testing typically includes network penetration testing and application security testing as well as controls and processes around the networks and applications, and should occur from both outside the network trying to come in (external testing) and from inside the network.

Storing Passwords - done right! Written by: Christoph Wille Translated by: Bernhard Spuida First published: 1/5/2004 Viewed 257725 times. 1766 ratings, avg. grade 4.76 In very many - not to say almost all - Web applications user data is administered, from Web forum to Web shop. These user data encompass login information of the users which contain the password besides the user name - and this in plain text. A security leak par excellence.

Brute Forcing Passwords and Word List Resources Brute force, even though it's gotten so fast, is still a long way away from cracking long complex passwords. That's were word lists come in handy. It's usually the crackers first go-to solution, slam a word list against the hash, if that doesn't work, try rainbow tables (if they happen to have the tables for that specific hash type), and then the full on brute force.

An Unprecedented Look at Stuxnet, the World's First Digital Weapon This recent undated satellite image provided by Space Imaging/Inta SpaceTurk shows the once-secret Natanz nuclear complex in Natanz, Iran, about 150 miles south of Tehran. AP Photo/Space Imaging/Inta SpaceTurk, HO In January 2010, inspectors with the International Atomic Energy Agency visiting the Natanz uranium enrichment plant in Iran noticed that centrifuges used to enrich uranium gas were failing at an unprecedented rate.

6 free network vulnerability scanners Though you may know and follow basic security measures on your own when installing and managing your network and websites, you'll never be able to keep up with and catch all the vulnerabilities by yourself. Vulnerability scanners can help you automate security auditing and can play a crucial part in your IT security. They can scan your network and websites for up to thousands of different security risks, producing a prioritized list of those you should patch, describe the vulnerabilities, and give steps on how to remediate them. Some can even automate the patching process. + ALSO ON NETWORK WORLD 8 free Wi-Fi security tools + Though vulnerability scanners and security auditing tools can cost a fortune, there are free options as well.

InfoSec Handlers Diary Blog - Hashing Passwords After talking about SQL Injection, this is the second part of the mini series to help you protect yourself from simple persistent attacks as we have seen them in the last couple months. A common MO employed in these attacks is to steal passwords from a database via sql injection. Later, the attacker will try to use these passwords to break into other sites for which users may choose the same password. Of course, part of the problem is password reuse. But for now, we will focus on the hashing of passwords to make it harder for an attacker to retrieve a users plain text password. First of all: What is hashing?

Biometrics.gov - Introduction to Biometrics The NSTC Subcommittee on Biometrics and Identity Management developed this introductory material in order to better communicate both within the government and with other interested parties. Stating facts and discussing related issues in a consistent, understandable manner, will enable smoother integration of privacy-protective biometric solutions. Federal agencies are working to ensure that their outreach activities are consistent with, and occasionally reference, this suite of documents so that the public, press and Congress are able to easily understand their plans and discuss them productively. The Subcommittee encourages other entities to also use and reference this material.

How the NSA's Firmware Hacking Works and Why It's So Unsettling One of the most shocking parts of the recently discovered spying network Equation Group is its mysterious module designed to reprogram or reflash a computer hard drive’s firmware with malicious code. The Kaspersky researchers who uncovered this said its ability to subvert hard drive firmware—the guts of any computer—“surpasses anything else” they had ever seen. The hacking tool, believed to be a product of the NSA, is significant because subverting the firmware gives the attackers God-like control of the system in a way that is stealthy and persistent even through software updates. Why biometrics don't work (Editor's note: In this guest essay, Dave Aitel, CEO of penetration testing firm Immunity Inc., points out two shortcomings with using biometric sensors as a replacement for old-fashioned passwords.) Weak passwords are often blamed for many security breaches - but one of the biggest mistakes we can make is to replace them with biometrics. Over the past few years, there's been a lot of discussion from security firms, startups, big technology companies and privacy advocates about the need for technology to move beyond the password. The most widely suggested replacement for passwords has been biometrics (fingerprints, heartbeats, voice and facial recognition, iris/retinas) - and now that Apple has just introduced a fingerprint scanner on the new iPhone 5S, it's going to add tremendous momentum to this already burgeoning industry. TOUCH ID: 10 questions on the iPhone's fingerprint sensor

HTG Explains: The Difference Between WEP, WPA, and WPA2 Wireless Encryption (and Why It Matters) Even if you know you need to secure your Wi-Fi network (and have already done so), you probably find all the encryption acronyms a little bit puzzling. Read on as we highlight the differences between encryption standards like WEP, WPA, and WPA2–and why it matters which acronym you slap on your home Wi-Fi network. What Does It Matter? You did what you were told to do, you logged into your router after you purchased it and plugged it in for the first time, and set a password. Understanding /etc/shadow file byVivek GiteonFebruary 23, 2006 last updated November 20, 2015 inBASH Shell, CentOS, Debian / Ubuntu, FreeBSD, HP-UX Unix, Linux, RedHat and Friends, Solaris-Unix, Suse, Ubuntu Linux, UNIX, User Management Can you explain /etc/shadow file format used under Linux or UNIX-like system? The /etc/shadow file stores actual password in encrypted format for user’s account with additional properties related to user password i.e. it stores secure user account information. All fields are separated by a colon (:) symbol.

The Best Hacking Tutorial Sites - Learn Legal Hacking - StumbleUpon written by: Daniel Robson•edited by: Aaron R.•updated: 2/13/2011 Whether it's to understand potential attack vectors or simply for the fun of it, learning the basics of hacking is something that a lot of people aspire to. Here's our list of the top tutorial based hacking sites.

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