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The greatest mystery of the Inca Empire was its strange economy

The greatest mystery of the Inca Empire was its strange economy
The author should read Graeber's "Debt: The First 5000 Years" to gain some insights into the evolution of markets in the ancient world. They were assuredly NOT created to facilitate bartering; rather, they (and cash money) evolved well after credit, likely as means of supplying armies on the march. Lacking this knowledge, the author is left chasing a popular myth — that barter came first, then cash, then credit — and ends of marveling that the Inca, who did not live anything like we do, were somehow able to nonetheless do so much "without ever spending a dime." It's a money-centric view of the world that fails to break free of its constraint, missing the point that money is utterly meaningless absent a system of debt that mandates its constant pursuit. 1/03/12 4:31pm

http://io9.com/5872764/the-greatest-mystery-of-the-inca-empire-was-its-strange-economy

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