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The greatest mystery of the Inca Empire was its strange economy

The greatest mystery of the Inca Empire was its strange economy
Related:  Ancient/Medieval HistoryPersonal/Virtual Learning Environment (PLE/VLE)

Ruins in Georgia mountains show evidence of Maya connection - National Architecture & Design Archaeological zone 9UN367 at Track Rock Gap, near Georgia’s highest mountain, Brasstown Bald, is a half mile (800 m) square and rises 700 feet (213 m) in elevation up a steep mountainside. Visible are at least 154 stone masonry walls for agricultural terraces, plus evidence of a sophisticated irrigation system and ruins of several other stone structures. Much more may be hidden underground. It is possibly the site of the fabled city of Yupaha, which Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto failed to find in 1540, and certainly one of the most important archaeological discoveries in recent times. Note: Due to the extreme popularity - and controversy - of this article, the Architecture & Design Examiner has created a sequel, which describes in detail the research methodology used by these Native American scholars, and invites readers to submit scientific evidence that either proves or disproves the interpretations of the Track Rock terrace complex by Native American scholars. Getting There

Anthropologists find American heads are getting larger White Americans' heads are getting bigger. That's according to research by forensic anthropologists at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Lee Jantz, coordinator of UT's Forensic Anthropology Center (FAC); Richard Jantz, professor emeritus and former director of the FAC; and Joanne Devlin, adjunct assistant professor, examined 1,500 skulls dating back to the mid-1800s through the mid-1980s. They noticed U.S. skulls have become larger, taller and narrower as seen from the front and faces have become significantly narrower and higher. The researchers cannot pinpoint a reason as to why American head shapes are changing and whether it is primarily due to evolution or lifestyle changes. "The varieties of changes that have swept American life make determining an exact cause an endlessly complicated proposition," said Lee Jantz. The researchers found that the average height from the base to the top of the skull in men has increased by eight millimeters (0.3 inches).

Top 10 Most Overlooked Mysteries in History Mysteries Over the last few months we have gone through 30 of the worlds greatest mysteries but what we haven’t covered are ancient mysteries. This list aims to put that right! Here are ten great unsolved mysteries of science. Do you have a theory that might solve one of these mysteries? 10. While many people know of the Moai of Easter Island, not that many people know of the other mystery associated with Easter Island. 9. In the late 2nd century AD, the Greek writer Pausanias wrote an account of how (4-500 years earlier?) 8. This mystery may even be a problem for those legendary investigators from CSI and the like! 7. The Minoans are best known for the legend of Theseus and the Minotaur, but it is in fact the demise of this once-great civilisation that is more interesting. 6. Everyone has heard of Stonehenge, but few know the Carnac Stones. 5. The historical search for the legendary thief Robin Hood has turned up masses of possible names. 4. 3. 2. 1. Jamie Frater

Time-Logging & Profit-Sharing Contractual Agreement – Ghosts With Shit Jobs Whereas it is unlikely that Ghosts With Shit Jobs will make a profit by being sold to broadcasters and/or distributors given that it is a no-budget production, I nonetheless desire to work on this film project either out of an interest in science fiction, the aesthetics of film-making, the principle of autonomous creation, the development of professional skills, the comradery of teamwork, or some combination thereof, So long as any hypothetical compensation should be as equitable as possible according to my efforts, and the process itself should be as fair, transparent and accountable as possible, Therefore, I hereby agree to the following contract: 1) I will log the hours I spend working on this project, with the understanding that my percentage of the profit will be equal to percentage of the total hours, irregardless of role, after having worked ten hours (eg. Name: ________________________________________________________________________

Wari culture Huari earthenware pot with painted design, 650-800 CE (Middle Horizon) Wari Tunic, Peru, 750-950 CE. This tunic is made of 120 separate small pieces of cloth, each individually tie-dyed. Ceramics of the period depict high-status men wearing this style of tunic. Monoliths Wari Wari funeral bundle Pikillaqta administrative center, built by the Wari civilization in Cusco The Wari (Spanish: Huari) were a Middle Horizon civilization that flourished in the south-central Andes and coastal area of modern-day Peru, from about AD 500 to 1000.[1] (The Wari culture is not to be confused with the modern ethnic group and language known as Wari', with which it has no known link.) Wari, as the former capital city was called, is located 11 km (6.8 mi) north-east of the modern city of Ayacucho, Peru. Little is known about the details of the Wari administrative structure, as they did not appear to use a form of written record. See also[edit] References[edit] Additional reading[edit] Collier, Simon et al.

Cullen Murphy - Inside the heresy files On a hot autumn day in Rome not long ago, I crossed the vast expanse of St Peter’s Square, paused momentarily in the shade beneath a curving flank of Bernini’s colonnade and continued a little way beyond to a Swiss Guard standing impassively at a wrought-iron gate. He examined my credentials, handed them back and saluted smartly. I hadn’t expected the gesture and almost returned the salute instinctively, but then realised it was intended for a cardinal waddling into the Vatican from behind me. Just inside the gate, at Piazza del Sant’Uffizio 11, stands a Renaissance palazzo with a ruddy ochre-and-cream complexion. But before the Congregation became the Holy Office, it went by yet another name: as late as 1908, it was known as the Sacred Congregation of the Universal Inquisition. The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith inherited more than the Inquisition’s DNA and its place on the organisational charts. It’s a troubling conclusion but an inescapable one. So the tools were new.

Intro to AI - Introduction to Artificial Intelligence - Oct-Dec 2011 'Lost' Medieval City Discovered Beneath Cambodian Jungle A lost city known only from inscriptions that existed some 1,200 years ago near Angkor in what is now Cambodia has been uncovered using airborne laser scanning. The previously undocumented cityscape, called Mahendraparvata, is hidden beneath a dense forest on the holy mountain Phnom Kulen, which means "Mountain of the Lychees." The cityscape came into clear view, along with a vast expanse of ancient urban spaces that made up Greater Angkor, the large area where one of the largest religious monuments ever constructed — Angkor Wat, meaning "temple city" — was built between A.D. 1113 and 1150. [See Images of Angkor Wat, New Temple City] Aerial view of Angkor Wat, showing the moat and causeway and the central tower surrounded by four smaller towersCredit: Alexey Stiop | Shutterstock.com Traces of temples In a series of archaeological mapping projects, scientists had previously used remote sensing to map subtle traces of Angkor. Lost medieval city Weird landscape

Why the multimillion dollar retirement is not for the middle class At their most self-indulgent, the theological scholars of the Renaissance were mocked for abandoning the debate over moral decisions to bicker about how many angels could dance on the head of a pin. The scholars of personal finance seem on track for a similar level of disconnection from reality. Take this new study, in the Financial Analysts Journal, that says "retirement is not hopeless." The authors of the study assume you will live to be 100 years old, by the way, if not 105 years old. The Wall Street Journal breezily calls this arrangement "retiring on your own terms." You can call it retiring on your own terms, the same way you can call buying a private jet and a ranch in Telluride, Colorado living on your own terms – the terms, that is, of fantasy and not reality. It's simply a math problem. Now you have to save that money as well as living on it. Then the final 20% goes to saving for retirement. This is a reasonable budget. Only a mere 110 years. That's a far-fetched expectation.

Moche (culture) The Moche civilization (alternatively, the Mochica culture, Early Chimu, Pre-Chimu, Proto-Chimu, etc.) flourished in northern Peru with its capital near present-day Moche and Trujillo,[1] from about 100 AD to 800 AD, during the Regional Development Epoch. While this issue is the subject of some debate, many scholars contend that the Moche were not politically organized as a monolithic empire or state. Rather, they were likely a group of autonomous polities that shared a common elite culture, as seen in the rich iconography and monumental architecture that survive today. Their adobe huacas have been mostly destroyed by looters and natural forces over the last 1300 years. Material culture[edit] Ceramics[edit] Traditional north coast Peruvian ceramic art uses a limited palette, relying primarily on red and white; fineline painting, fully modeled clay, veristic figures, and stirrup spouts. The realistic detail in Moche ceramics may have helped them serve as didactic models. Textiles[edit]

Powered By Osteons: Line on the left, one cross each: Bioarchaeology of Crucifixion As a researcher of the classical world, one of my favorite movies is Monty Python's Life of Brian. An irreverent take on the swords-and-sandals perception of the Roman Empire, it takes place in Jerusalem in the early first century AD and focuses on an accidental prophet named Brian. Anyone who's ever taken Latin has probably seen the portion of the film mocking Brian for his poor grasp of the language of power or the scene in which the leaders of the rebellion answer the question "What have the Romans ever done for us?" But the movie also satirizes the pugilistic, callous nature of the Romans in a crucifixion scene: The Romans practiced crucifixion - literally, "fixed to a cross" - for nearly a millennium. Like death by guillotine in early modern times, crucifixion was a public act, but unlike the swift action of the guillotine, crucifixion involved a long and painful - hence, excruciating - death. The process of crucifying someone varied greatly, as recorded by Seneca in 40 AD: N. J.E.

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