background preloader

Gentrification

Gentrification
Gentrification is a shift in an urban community toward wealthier residents and/or businesses and increasing property values.[1] Gentrification is typically the result of investment in a community by local government, community activists, or business groups, and can often spur economic development, attract business, and lower crime rates. In addition to these potential benefits, gentrification can lead to population migration, which involves poorer residents being displaced by wealthier newcomers. In a community undergoing gentrification, the average income increases and average family size decreases. Political action is often the community's response, either to promote the gentrification or oppose economic eviction.[4] Local governments may favor gentrification because of the increased tax base associated with the new high-income residents, as well as other perceived benefits of moving poor people and rehabilitating deteriorated areas. Origin and etymology[edit] Causes[edit] Related:  House music

Modernism Hans Hofmann, "The Gate", 1959–1960, collection: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Hofmann was renowned not only as an artist but also as a teacher of art, and a modernist theorist both in his native Germany and later in the U.S. Modernism is a philosophical movement that, along with cultural trends and changes, arose from wide-scale and far-reaching transformations in Western society in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. History[edit] Beginnings: the 19th century[edit] According to one critic, modernism developed out of Romanticism's revolt against the effects of the Industrial Revolution and bourgeois values: "The ground motive of modernism, Graff asserts, was criticism of the nineteenth-century bourgeois social order and its world view […] the modernists, carrying the torch of romanticism".[5][6][7] While J. However, the Industrial Revolution continued. The beginnings of modernism in France[edit] Explosion, early 20th century to 1930[edit]

John Oliver reams wealthy, entitled ‘dweebs’ at tech awards show: ‘F*ck you, straight away’ By David FergusonWednesday, February 12, 2014 9:39 EDT “Daily Show” alumnus John Oliver emceed the annual “Crunchie” awards on Tuesday night, but was apparently not feeling any great love toward the assembled crowd of tech industry elites. “F*ck you, straight away,” he said by way of greeting as he took the stage. “It is once again an honor,” he continued, “to be in a room with such an illustrious group of high-functioning nerds. Thank you for having me, dweebs.” He went on the ridicule the sense of entitlement that is coming to be associated with Silicon Valley’s millionaire culture and the way those who benefit from the tech boom are contemptuous of people poorer and worse off than themselves. Perhaps, he said, San Francisco’s notorious Google buses — which ferry employees back and forth to work but not regular citizens — should tint their windows from the inside so that the riders aren’t troubled by the sight of “peasants” during their daily commute. David Ferguson

Age of Enlightenment The Age of Enlightenment (or simply the Enlightenment, or Age of Reason) is an era from the 1650s to the 1780s in which cultural and intellectual forces in Western Europe emphasized reason, analysis and individualism rather than traditional lines of authority. It was promoted by philosophes and local thinkers in urban coffeehouses, salons and masonic lodges. It challenged the authority of institutions that were deeply rooted in society, such as the Catholic Church; there was much talk of ways to reform society with toleration, science and skepticism. New ideas and beliefs spread around the continent and were fostered by an increase in literacy due to a departure from solely religious texts. Use of the term[edit] The term "Enlightenment" emerged in English in the later part of the 19th century,[2] with particular reference to French philosophy, as the equivalent of the French term 'Lumières' (used first by Dubos in 1733 and already well established by 1751). Time span[edit] Goals[edit]

Detroit Detroit /dɨˈtrɔɪt/[7] is the most populous city in the U.S. state of Michigan, and is also the seat of Wayne County, the most populous county in the state and the largest city on the United States-Canada border. It is a primary business, cultural, financial and transportation center in the Metro Detroit area, a region of 5.2 million people, and serves as a major port on the Detroit River connecting the Great Lakes system to the Saint Lawrence Seaway. It was founded on July 24, 1701, by the French explorer and adventurer Antoine Laumet de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac. The Detroit area emerged as a significant metropolitan region within the United States as construction of a regional freeway system was completed in the 1950s and 1960s. History[edit] The region's fur trade was an important economic activity. During the French and Indian War (1760), British troops gained control and shortened the name to Detroit. From 1805 to 1847, Detroit was the capital of Michigan. 20th century[edit]

Electronic dance music Electronic dance music (also known as EDM, dance music,[1] club music,[2] or simply dance) is a broad range of percussive electronic music genres produced primarily for dance-based entertainment environments such as nightclubs, raves, and festivals. The music is largely produced for playback by disc jockeys (DJs) and is generally used in the context of a live DJ mixes where the DJ creates a seamless selection of tracks by segueing from one recording to the next.[3] The term "electronic dance music" and the acronym "EDM" was adopted by the U.S. music industry and music press as a buzzword to describe the increasingly commercial American electronic music scene that developed in the 2000s. In this context, EDM does not refer to a specific genre, but is an umbrella term for a number of popular genres, including house, dubstep, trance, and trap.[4][5][6] History[edit] Acid house and Rave[edit] North American commercialization of EDM[edit] Criticism of commercial EDM[edit] Terminology[edit]

House music Influences and precursors[edit] Rachel Cain, co-founder of an influential Trax Records, was previously involved in the burgeoning punk scene and cites industrial (another Chicago originating music creation) and post-punk record store Wax Trax! Records as an important connection between the ever-changing underground sounds of Chicago. As most proto-house DJs were primarily stuck to playing their conventional ensamble of dance records, Frankie Knuckles and Ron Hardy, two influential pioneers of house music, were known for their out-of-bounds behavior. Origins (1980s)[edit] Chicago house[edit] Main article: Chicago house Starting in 1984, some of these DJs, inspired by Jesse Saunders' success with "On and On", tried their hand at producing and releasing original compositions. Acid house arose from Chicago artists' experiments with the squelchy Roland TB-303 bass synthesizer, and the style's origins on vinyl is generally cited as Phuture's "Acid Tracks" (1987). Origins of the term[edit]

House dance Characteristics[edit] "House Dance is an amalgamation of the post-disco era.[1] A lot of their movements and what took place in certain key places, the Jack and a number of clubs after that. It was a community based dance so vocal points were surrounded by music and DJs, but many of the dancers who were not looking to create, ended up becoming a part of that dance vocabulary The major source in house dance movement steams directly from the music and the elements within the music such as jazz, African, Latin, soul, R&B, funk, hip hop, etc. In house dancing there is an emphasis on the subtle rhythms and riffs of the music, and the footwork follows them closely. In the early progressions of the dance, there were hundreds of phenomenal dancers that were key in its progression in this social dance scene. References[edit] Reynolds, Simon. Notes[edit] External links[edit] Competitions and festivals:

Technological utopianism In the late 20th and early 21st centuries, several ideologies and movements, such as the cyberdelic counterculture, the Californian Ideology, transhumanism,[1] and singularitarianism, have emerged promoting a form of techno-utopia as a reachable goal. Cultural critic Imre Szeman argues technological utopianism is an irrational social narrative because there is no evidence to support it. He concludes that what it shows is the extent to which modern societies place a lot of faith in narratives of progress and technology overcoming things, despite all evidence to the contrary.[2] History[edit] Technological utopianism from the 19th to mid-20th centuries[edit] Karl Marx believed that science and democracy were the right and left hands of what he called the move from the realm of necessity to the realm of freedom. Some technological utopians promoted eugenics. H.G. The horrors of the 20th century - communist and fascist dictatorships, world wars - caused many to abandon optimism.

Techno-progressivism Stance[edit] Strong techno-progressive positions include support for the civil right of a person to either maintain or modify his or her own mind and body, on his or her own terms, through informed, consensual recourse to, or refusal of, available therapeutic or enabling biomedical technology.[3] Contrasting stance[edit] Bioconservatism (a portmanteau word combining "biology" and "conservatism") is a stance of hesitancy about technological development especially if it is perceived to threaten a given social order. Bioconservatives range in political perspective from right-leaning religious and cultural conservatives to left-leaning environmentalists and technology critics. List of notable techno-progressive social critics[edit] Techno-progressive subjects of interest[edit] Controversy[edit] References[edit] External links[edit]

Transhumanism Transhumanism (abbreviated as H+ or h+) is an international cultural and intellectual movement with an eventual goal of fundamentally transforming the human condition by developing and making widely available technologies to greatly enhance human intellectual, physical, and psychological capacities.[1] Transhumanist thinkers study the potential benefits and dangers of emerging technologies that could overcome fundamental human limitations, as well as the ethics of developing and using such technologies. They speculate that human beings may eventually be able to transform themselves into beings with such greatly expanded abilities as to merit the label "posthuman".[1] History[edit] According to Nick Bostrom,[1] transcendentalist impulses have been expressed at least as far back as in the quest for immortality in the Epic of Gilgamesh, as well as historical quests for the Fountain of Youth, Elixir of Life, and other efforts to stave off aging and death. First transhumanist proposals[edit]

The Californian Ideology Richard Barbrook (left) and Andy Cameron (right) "The Californian Ideology" is a critique of dotcom neoliberalism by English media theorists Richard Barbrook and Andy Cameron of the University of Westminster.[1] Barbrook and Cameron argue that the rise of networking technologies in Silicon Valley in the 1990s was linked to American neoliberalism and a paradoxical hybridization of beliefs from the political left and right in the form of hopeful technological determinism. Andrew Leonard of Salon.com called Barbrook & Cameron's work "one of the most penetrating critiques of neo-conservative digital hypesterism yet published."[2] Louis Rossetto, former editor and publisher of Wired magazine, vehemently denounced it as an "anal retentive attachment to failed 19th century social and economic analysis". Critique[edit] Richard Barbrook and Andy Cameron[3] Influences[edit] Reception[edit] See also[edit] Notes[edit] References[edit] Further reading[edit] Barbrook, Richard. (2007). External links[edit]

Technological determinism Technological determinism is a reductionist theory that presumes that a society's technology drives the development of its social structure and cultural values. The term is believed to have been coined by Thorstein Veblen (1857–1929), an American sociologist and economist. The most radical technological determinist in the United States in the 20th century was most likely Clarence Ayres who was a follower of Thorstein Veblen and John Dewey. William Ogburn was also known for his radical technological determinism. Origin[edit] The term is believed to have been coined by Thorstein Veblen (1857–1929), an American social scientist. Explanation[edit] Technological determinism seeks to show technical developments, media, or technology as a whole, as the key mover in history and social change.[4] Most interpretations of technological determinism share two general ideas: Technological determinism has been summarized as 'The belief in technology as a key governing force in society ...' Criticism[edit]

Related: