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Gentrification

Gentrification
Gentrification is a shift in an urban community toward wealthier residents and/or businesses and increasing property values.[1] Gentrification is typically the result of investment in a community by local government, community activists, or business groups, and can often spur economic development, attract business, and lower crime rates. In addition to these potential benefits, gentrification can lead to population migration, which involves poorer residents being displaced by wealthier newcomers. In a community undergoing gentrification, the average income increases and average family size decreases. Political action is often the community's response, either to promote the gentrification or oppose economic eviction.[4] Local governments may favor gentrification because of the increased tax base associated with the new high-income residents, as well as other perceived benefits of moving poor people and rehabilitating deteriorated areas. Origin and etymology[edit] Causes[edit] Related:  House music

Modernism Hans Hofmann, "The Gate", 1959–1960, collection: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Hofmann was renowned not only as an artist but also as a teacher of art, and a modernist theorist both in his native Germany and later in the U.S. Modernism is a philosophical movement that, along with cultural trends and changes, arose from wide-scale and far-reaching transformations in Western society in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. History[edit] Beginnings: the 19th century[edit] According to one critic, modernism developed out of Romanticism's revolt against the effects of the Industrial Revolution and bourgeois values: "The ground motive of modernism, Graff asserts, was criticism of the nineteenth-century bourgeois social order and its world view […] the modernists, carrying the torch of romanticism".[5][6][7] While J. However, the Industrial Revolution continued. The beginnings of modernism in France[edit] Explosion, early 20th century to 1930[edit]

Garden city movement Ebenezer Howard's 3 magnets diagram which addressed the question 'Where will the people go?', the choices being 'Town', 'Country' or 'Town-Country' The garden city movement is a method of urban planning that was initiated in 1898 by Sir Ebenezer Howard in the United Kingdom. Garden cities were intended to be planned, self-contained communities surrounded by "greenbelts", containing proportionate areas of residences, industry and agriculture. Inspired by the Utopian novel Looking Backward and Henry George's work Progress and Poverty, Howard published his book To-morrow: a Peaceful Path to Real Reform in 1898 (which was reissued in 1902 as Garden Cities of To-morrow). Early development[edit] Howard’s To-morrow: a peaceful path to real reform sold enough copies to result in a second edition, Garden Cities of To-morrow. To build a garden city, Howard needed money to buy land. Even until the end of the 1930s, Letchworth and Welwyn remained as the only existing garden cities.

Age of Enlightenment The Age of Enlightenment (or simply the Enlightenment, or Age of Reason) is an era from the 1650s to the 1780s in which cultural and intellectual forces in Western Europe emphasized reason, analysis and individualism rather than traditional lines of authority. It was promoted by philosophes and local thinkers in urban coffeehouses, salons and masonic lodges. It challenged the authority of institutions that were deeply rooted in society, such as the Catholic Church; there was much talk of ways to reform society with toleration, science and skepticism. New ideas and beliefs spread around the continent and were fostered by an increase in literacy due to a departure from solely religious texts. Use of the term[edit] The term "Enlightenment" emerged in English in the later part of the 19th century,[2] with particular reference to French philosophy, as the equivalent of the French term 'Lumières' (used first by Dubos in 1733 and already well established by 1751). Time span[edit] Goals[edit]

Commuter town A commuter town, also known as an exurb, bedroom community (Canada usage, bedroom town or bedroom suburb U.S. usage), a dormitory town or dormitory suburb (UK Commonwealth and Ireland usage), or less commonly a dormitory village (UK Commonwealth and Ireland), suggests that residents sleep in these neighborhoods, but normally work elsewhere; they also suggest that these communities have little commercial or industrial activity beyond a small amount of retail, oriented toward serving the residents. Distinction between suburbs and commuter towns[edit] Camarillo, California, a typical U.S. bedroom community made up almost entirely of homes, schools and retail outlets. Suburbs and commuter towns are often the same place, but sometimes not. Causes[edit] Commuter towns can arise for a number of different reasons. Often, however, commuter towns form when workers in a region cannot afford to live where they work and must seek residency in another town with a lower cost of living. Effects[edit]

Detroit Detroit /dɨˈtrɔɪt/[7] is the most populous city in the U.S. state of Michigan, and is also the seat of Wayne County, the most populous county in the state and the largest city on the United States-Canada border. It is a primary business, cultural, financial and transportation center in the Metro Detroit area, a region of 5.2 million people, and serves as a major port on the Detroit River connecting the Great Lakes system to the Saint Lawrence Seaway. It was founded on July 24, 1701, by the French explorer and adventurer Antoine Laumet de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac. The Detroit area emerged as a significant metropolitan region within the United States as construction of a regional freeway system was completed in the 1950s and 1960s. History[edit] The region's fur trade was an important economic activity. During the French and Indian War (1760), British troops gained control and shortened the name to Detroit. From 1805 to 1847, Detroit was the capital of Michigan. 20th century[edit]

Urban area Urban areas with at least one million inhabitants in 2006. By the end of the twentieth century, 47% of the world's population lived in cities, a figure which has risen from 3% since 1800. World map showing percent of population living in an urban environment. There are about 7.1 billion people living on the planet.[1] In 2009, the number of people living in urban areas (3.42 billion) surpassed the number living in rural areas (3.41 billion) and since then the world has become more urban than rural.[2] This is the first time that the majority of the world's population lives in a city.[3] Urban areas are created and further developed by the process of urbanization. Unlike an urban area, a metropolitan area includes not only the urban area, but also satellite cities plus intervening rural land that is socio-economically connected to the urban core city, typically by employment ties through commuting, with the urban core city being the primary labor market. Definitions[edit] Argentina[edit]

Electronic dance music Electronic dance music (also known as EDM, dance music,[1] club music,[2] or simply dance) is a broad range of percussive electronic music genres produced primarily for dance-based entertainment environments such as nightclubs, raves, and festivals. The music is largely produced for playback by disc jockeys (DJs) and is generally used in the context of a live DJ mixes where the DJ creates a seamless selection of tracks by segueing from one recording to the next.[3] The term "electronic dance music" and the acronym "EDM" was adopted by the U.S. music industry and music press as a buzzword to describe the increasingly commercial American electronic music scene that developed in the 2000s. In this context, EDM does not refer to a specific genre, but is an umbrella term for a number of popular genres, including house, dubstep, trance, and trap.[4][5][6] History[edit] Acid house and Rave[edit] North American commercialization of EDM[edit] Criticism of commercial EDM[edit] Terminology[edit]

Chicago school (sociology) In sociology and later criminology, the Chicago School (sometimes described as the Ecological School) was the first major body of works emerging during the 1920s and 1930s specialising in urban sociology, and the research into the urban environment by combining theory and ethnographic fieldwork in Chicago, now applied elsewhere. While involving scholars at several Chicago area universities, the term is often used interchangeably to refer to the University of Chicago's sociology department—one of the oldest and one of the most prestigious. Following World War II, a "Second Chicago School" arose whose members used symbolic interactionism combined with methods of field research, to create a new body of work.[1] This was one of the first institutions to use quantitative methods in criminology. The Chicago School is best known for its urban sociology and for the development of the symbolic interactionist approach. The work of Frederic E. Clements (1916) was particularly influential.

House music Influences and precursors[edit] Rachel Cain, co-founder of an influential Trax Records, was previously involved in the burgeoning punk scene and cites industrial (another Chicago originating music creation) and post-punk record store Wax Trax! Records as an important connection between the ever-changing underground sounds of Chicago. As most proto-house DJs were primarily stuck to playing their conventional ensamble of dance records, Frankie Knuckles and Ron Hardy, two influential pioneers of house music, were known for their out-of-bounds behavior. Origins (1980s)[edit] Chicago house[edit] Main article: Chicago house Starting in 1984, some of these DJs, inspired by Jesse Saunders' success with "On and On", tried their hand at producing and releasing original compositions. Acid house arose from Chicago artists' experiments with the squelchy Roland TB-303 bass synthesizer, and the style's origins on vinyl is generally cited as Phuture's "Acid Tracks" (1987). Origins of the term[edit]

Urban geography New York City, one of the largest urban areas in the world Urban geography is the study of areas which have a high concentration of buildings and infrastructure. Predominantly towns and cities, these are areas with a high population density and with the majority of economic activities in the secondary sector and tertiary sectors. It is a sub-discipline of human geography. It often overlaps with other fields of study such as anthropology, urban planning and urban sociology. Areas of study[edit] There are essentially two approaches to urban geography. Cities as centers of manufacturing and services[edit] The purpose of classifying cities is twofold. The simplest way to classify cities is to identify the distinctive role they play in the city system. The relationship between the city system and the development of manufacturing has become very apparent. See also[edit] External links[edit]

House dance Characteristics[edit] "House Dance is an amalgamation of the post-disco era.[1] A lot of their movements and what took place in certain key places, the Jack and a number of clubs after that. It was a community based dance so vocal points were surrounded by music and DJs, but many of the dancers who were not looking to create, ended up becoming a part of that dance vocabulary The major source in house dance movement steams directly from the music and the elements within the music such as jazz, African, Latin, soul, R&B, funk, hip hop, etc. In house dancing there is an emphasis on the subtle rhythms and riffs of the music, and the footwork follows them closely. In the early progressions of the dance, there were hundreds of phenomenal dancers that were key in its progression in this social dance scene. References[edit] Reynolds, Simon. Notes[edit] External links[edit] Competitions and festivals:

Learning from the slums (1/2):literature and urban renewal “Slumdog Millionaire” is the movie of the year. Its story of a young guy from Mumbai’s slum of Dharavi, who manages to change its destiny through the “Who wants to be a Millionaire” game has charmed many people, including the Oscars’ jury, who awarded the movie with 8 prizes. At the same time, the movie has created a debate around slums and how the movie portrays them. “Slumdog Millionaire” follows the mainstream vision of slums, described in the XIX century by writers like Daniel Defoe or Charles Dickens: dark, dirty places, with people packed in small rooms with no water facilities. In slums, riots are frequents, and police can hardly enter: the perfect place for criminals to hide and plan their threats to the society, and the perfect incubator for all sort of diseases. Dharavi walkway, (image: Flickr) Glasgow slum, 1871(image: Wikipedia) One of the first cities to enforce an urban renewal policy was Paris. Paris, quartier des Halles. Paris: a typical pre-Haussmann street. Rome.

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