background preloader


A very quick one (5 minute blog post?).. Firstly I want to thank @TeacherToolkit for the 5 minute series and @DaK_74 for the fantastic idea of using it for a test analysis. My fantastic year 11s did a PPE (Pre Public Exam) recently... Read more » Due to popular demand, I have created a set of 5 “Essential Skills” sheets for Core 1. They are aimed at the AQA syllabus but could easily be adapted to suit others.

Related:  ejmathsTeaching MathsMath stuff

Nuffield Foundation This site provides resources for teaching the use of mathematics and statistics. The resources are self-contained and can be used for any lessons where the context or skills are relevant. Nuffield Mathematics resources are divided into three levels and can be used to support a wide variety of qualifications, including Free-Standing Mathematics Qualifications (FSMQs), A/AS Use of Mathematics and the new Core Maths qualifications. We provide schemes of work for using the resources to support Use of Mathematics and FSMQs. We have also outlined which resources are relevant to each of the six new Core Maths qualifications.

Why Do Buses Come in Threes? Some people have a fear of mathematics, possibly because of the abstract teaching methods that were in use in my schooldays. I get the impression that things have changed somewhat since then, but in any case this book provides an easy to understand some of the things that happen in everyday life. The first chapter begins with numbers that occur frequently in plants, explaining why four-leafed clovers are rare. Depending on the species, plants tend to have three leaves like clovers, or five leaves like buttercups, pansies and primroses, rather than four.

Brent Davis Brent Davis is Professor and Distinguished Research Chair in Mathematics Education in the Faculty of Education at the University of Calgary. Prior to his appointment at the U of C in January, 2010, he held positions at the University of British Columbia (David Robitalle Chair in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education, 2006-2009, and 1994-1997), the University of Alberta (Canada Research Chair in Mathematics Education and the Ecologies of Learning, 2001-2006), and York University in Toronto (1997-2001). He completed his PhD in mathematics education and curriculum studies at the University of Alberta in 1994, under the supervision of Thomas E. Kieren.

Web 2.0 Tools for Math Educators By Laura Turner This is a continuing series on Web2.0 and other web-based tools for educators. This information is specific to math educators, but there is some crossover into science. Math educators will find a large number of useable interactive companion web sites for the teaching of math concepts and skills. 3Dvinci 3D design is a great motivational and instructional tool. It exercises both left-brain and right-brain skills, and appeals to students of all abilities.

lhmaths This page contains a selection of my resources for use in Mathematics classrooms. Enjoy! Starter Activities All of the following are short activities designed for use either with students whiteboards or traffic light cards (multi-choice questions). Number:

Feature: What is the Mastery Model of Teaching Maths? Education minister Elizabeth Truss explained some of the background to the government’s current proposals for teaching maths in a recent speech. This article was originally published on The Conversation. By Steve Chinn, University of Derby She mentioned the term “mastery” and enthusiastically welcomed Singapore Maths, a series of textbooks following the “mastery model” by Marshall Cavendish Education, that will be published in the UK from 2015 by Oxford University Press. One might be tempted to assume Singapore Maths might have something to do with the Ministry of Education in Singapore.

Open-Ended Assessment in Math Welcome Here's a way to move beyond traditional assessment methods in math by using open-ended questions that require students to communicate their mathematical thinking. Developed by Thomas Cooney, Wendy Sanchez, Keith Leatham, and Denise Mewborn, Open-Ended Assessment in Math provides more than 450 questions. All involve significant mathematics, are solvable in a variety of ways, elicit a range of responses, and enable students to reveal their reasoning processes. This online resource also offers samples of student answers, a scoring rubric, and additional narrative material that addresses the nature, construction, and reasons for using open-ended items. Choose items by grade level and/or content area, including the following:

Mathster: Free Maths Worksheets - free worksheets for KS1, KS2, KS3, KS4 and A level Maths Download our free maths worksheets individually below or combined together as a zip or rar file. All the free maths worksheets were generated in seconds by Mathster! You can create your own maths worksheets very easily - take a free months trial subscription and see how easy Mathster makes it! Want something else besides free maths worksheets? How about a desktop scientific calculator? Practical tips for a (newly) qualified maths teacher Student teachers, NQTs and experienced teachers have one thing in common - they haven't got it all figured out yet. I certainly haven't - every year I try to use my time more effectively and teach maths more effectively. Here's my top ten tips for newbies. 1. Plans At my school we used to have 4.5 periods a week to teach A level. That was reduced to 4 periods a week due to budget cuts - a loss of around 15 teaching hours.

7 Resources for Integrating Math and Humane Education The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Humane Education website at Thank you for sharing “I thought math was just a subject they implanted on us just because they felt like it, but now I realize that you could use math to defend your rights and realize the injustices around you.… [N]ow I think math is truly necessary and, I have to admit it, kinda cool. It’s sort of like a pass you could use to try to make the world a better place Loving your subject “To explain something to someone is first of all to show him he cannot understand it by himself.”Jacques Ranciere The previous post in this series looked at developing a love of Mathematics itself, and how an appreciation of the history and impact of Mathematics makes a difference to your team’s practice in the classroom. This time around, I’ll be talking about how an appreciation of pedagogy, the philosophy of Mathematics education and what engaging students in the subject really means (spoiler: it doesn’t mean ‘fun’ tasks for their own sake). So let’s begin.