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Mapping The World Grid

Mapping The World Grid
MAPPING THE WORLD GRID by David Hatcher Childress What is the World Grid? How can it be it mapped? What does it do? In my many travels around the world in search of lost cities and ancient mysteries I have often wondered if there was some link connecting many of the ancient megalithic sites. Are megalithic sites laid out on a grid? In other words, we are speaking about an intelligent geometric pattern into which, theoretically, the Earth and its energies are organized - and possibly in which the ubiquitous ancient megalithic sites are also positioned. What we are speaking of is fundamentally different from longitudinal and latitudinal lines that we are so familiar with from conventional geography. However the familiar image of the Earth as a globe girded in a lattice of longitude and latitude lines helps us understand what an Earth Grid, based on more primary energy lines, might be like. This subject will be discussed in the book. Mapping the World Grid, was popular in the Middle Ages R.

Earth's Grid System, Becker-Hagens, Ley Lines, Hartmann Net, Curry Lines - Science and Pseudoscience Earth's Grid Systems Science and Pseudoscience Topography, is the study of Earth's surface shape and features or those of planets, moons, and asteroids. Planetary Energetic Grid Theory Planetary Energetic Grid Theory falls under the heading of pseudoscience. Plato recognized grids and their patterns, devising a theory that the Earth's basic structure evolved from a simple geometric shapes to more complex ones. Becker-Hagens Grid Bill Becker and Bethe Hagens discussed the code of the Platonic Solids' positions on Earth, ascribing this discovery to the work of Ivan P. Becker and Hagens' attention was drawn to this research through the work of Chris Bird, who punished "Planetary Grid" in the New Age Journal in May 1975. They proposed that the planetary grid map outlined by the Russian team Goncharov, Morozov and Makarov is essentially correct, with its overall organization anchored to the north and south axial poles and the Great Pyramid at Gizeh. We see Dr. According to Dr. Ley Lines Examples

Global Issues : social, political, economic and environmental issues that affect us all Mephistopheles Mephistopheles (also Mephisto, Mephistophilus, Mephist, Murphy, Mephy, Murphy Stoffelis, and Mephistophilis as referred to in the original text) is a name given to one of the chief demons of Christian mythology that figure in European literary traditions. The name is frequently used as an alternative form of Satan or the Devil. Because the name Mephistopheles evolved during the Renaissance, Mephistopheles makes no appearance in the Bible. Mephistopheles is portrayed in the legend of Faustus, as the name of the Devil to whom Faust sells his soul. Mephistopheles is known throughout Goethe’s book as a “fallen angel” himself, as he clearly states to Faustus. Mefisto is also the title of a book by contemporary Irish writer John Banville. The meaning, if any, of the name “Mephistopheles” is unknown, although the historical evidence suggests that it was invented by the anonymous author of the German chapbook that made the Faust story famous. Mephistopheles in popular culture

Social influence Morton Deutsch and Harold Gerard described two psychological needs that lead humans to conform to the expectations of others. These include our need to be right (informational social influence), and our need to be liked (normative social influence).[3] Informational influence (or social proof) is an influence to accept information from another as evidence about reality. Informational influence comes into play when people are uncertain, either because stimuli are intrinsically ambiguous or because there is social disagreement. Types[edit] Social Influence is a broad term that relates to many different phenomena. Kelman's varieties[edit] There are three processes of attitude change as defined by Harvard psychologist Herbert Kelman in his 1958 paper in the Journal of Conflict Resolution.[2] The purpose of defining these processes was to help determine the effects of social influence: for example, to separate public conformity (behavior) from private acceptance (personal belief). Status[edit]

Faust Malaysia Malaysia ( i/məˈleɪʒə/ mə-LAY-zhə or Malaysia has its origins in the Malay Kingdoms present in the area which, from the 18th century, became subject to the British Empire. The first British territories were known as the Straits Settlements, whose establishment was followed by the Malay kingdoms becoming British protectorates. The territories on Peninsular Malaysia were first unified as the Malayan Union in 1946. The country is multi-ethnic and multi-cultural, which plays a large role in politics. Etymology "Malaysia" used as a label for the Malay Archipelago on a 1914 map from a United States atlas Before the onset of European colonization, the Malay peninsula was known natively as Tanah Melayu ('Malay Land').[25][26] Under the racial classification created by European scholars the natives of Maritime Southeast Asia were grouped into a single category, the Malay race. History A Famosa fortress in Malacca was built by the Portuguese in the 16th century. Government and politics

Dark Night of the Soul Dark Night of the Soul "Dark night of the soul" sounds like a threatening and much to be avoided experience. Yet perhaps a quarter of the seekers on the road to higher consciousness will pass through the dark night. In fact, they may pass through several until they experience the profound joy of their true nature. Many seekers would encourage the dark night experience if they knew what it was. However, to one engaged in the dark night, suffering seems unending. The dark night occurs after considerable advancement toward higher consciousness. You Can’t Fit In

MSPBS » Ministerio de Salud Publica y Bienestar Social Valknut Also known as: Hrungnir’s heart, heart of the slain, Heart of Vala, borromean triangles The emblem at left found on old Norse stone carvings and funerary stelés, is sometimes called “Hrungnir’s heart,” after the legendary giant of the Eddas. It is best known as the Valknut, or “knot of the slain,” and it has been found on stone carvings as a funerary motif, where it probably signified the afterlife. The emblem is often found in art depicting the God Odin, where it may represent the gods power over death. The Valknut’s three interlocking shapes are suggestive of related Celtic symbols of motherhood and rebirth- it may have been a goddess symbol at some point in history. The symbol’s nine points have an obvious correlation with childbirth; the placement of the symbol on funeral monuments mark it as a sign of rebirth of reincarnation. The triceps was used into the middle ages as a magical sign of protection.

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