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LIBERTY! . Road to Revolution Game

LIBERTY! . Road to Revolution Game

http://www.pbs.org/ktca/liberty/road.html

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Writing in Hieroglyphs Learn about hieroglyphs and writing © 2012 This website is produced by the Student Recruitment, Admissions and International Development Division at The University of Manchester About this Collection - American Revolution and Its Era: Maps and Charts of North America and the West Indies, 1750-1789 The collection represents an important historical record of the mapping of North America and the Caribbean. Most of the items presented here are documented in Maps and Charts of North America and the West Indies, 1750-1789: A Guide to the Collections in the Library of Congress compiled by John R. Sellers and Patricia Molen van Ee in 1981. The bibliography contains approximately 2,000 maps and charts. Over the next several years many of the maps and charts in this bibliography will be added to the online collection each month.

Quick View Comparison: Pilgrims, Puritans, Quakers for Kids - Who were they and what did they believe? Pilgrims: A small group of people arrived in the New World from England on a ship named the Mayflower. They landed at Plymouth Rock, Massachusetts. Back in England, everyone had to belong to the Church of England. The Pilgrims did not want to belong to the Church of England.

George Hewes Eyewitness to the BTP - Primary Source The tea destroyed was contained in three ships, lying near each other at what was called at that time Griffin's wharf, and were surrounded by armed ships of war, the commanders of which had publicly declared that if the rebels, as they were pleased to style the Bostonians, should not withdraw their opposition to the landing of the tea before a certain day, the 17th day of December, 1773, they should on that day force it on shore, under the cover of their cannon's mouth. On the day preceding the seventeenth, there was a meeting of the citizens of the county of Suffolk, convened at one of the churches in Boston, for the purpose of consulting on what measures might be considered expedient to prevent the landing of the tea, or secure the people from the collection of the duty. At that meeting a committee was appointed to wait on Governor Hutchinson, and request him to inform them whether he would take any measures to satisfy the people on the object of the meeting.

Facts Summary Timeline Westward Expansion summary: The story of the United States has always been one of westward expansion, beginning along the East Coast and continuing, often by leaps and bounds, until it reached the Pacific—what Theodore Roosevelt described as "the great leap Westward." The acquisition of Hawaii and Alaska, though not usually included in discussions of Americans expanding their nation westward, continued the practices established under the principle of Manifest Destiny. Even before the American colonies won their independence from Britain in the Revolutionary War, settlers were migrating westward into what are now the states of Kentucky and Tennessee, as well as parts of the Ohio Valley and the Deep South. Westward the Course of Empire Facts about the Revolutionary War *** Facts about the Revolutionary War This article contains fast facts and information about the Revolutionary War. Why did the American Revolutionary War begin? Because the American colonists believed that they deserved all the rights of Englishmen but were not receiving them.

Slavery Throughout the World: World History in Context No system of slavery has persisted on a significant scale unless supported by continuing systematic introductions of fresh captives: strangers brought into the slaveholding society without the cultural knowledge of seasoned slaves, not to mention the inherited rights accorded locally born members of the host community. Trade as a source of such newcomers has the specific connotation of purposive investment in--and organized movements of--people, by merchants in a commercialized economy. Otherwise, small numbers of dependent newcomers might enter localized communities through occasional, ad hoc transfers from neighbors, below the threshold of such an organized "trade." Distressed persons have offered themselves...View More

The Thirteen American Colonies The Thirteen American Colonies Part 1: Coming to America The first colonies in North America were along the eastern coast. Settlers from Spain, France, Sweden, Holland, and England claimed land beginning in the 17th century. The American Revolutionary War - American History for Kids! English soldiers search a settler's house (1770s) In 1763 AD England won the French and Indian War against France (which had been fought mainly in North America), and so the English-speaking settlers on the East Coast could stop worrying that they were about to be taken over by France. To pay for that war, the English government began to make the the English-speaking settlers pay more and more taxes. This brought the English a lot of money, but it made the settlers more and more angry.

Say What? 5 Ways to Get Students to Listen Ah, listening, the neglected literacy skill. I know when I was a high school English teacher this was not necessarily a primary focus; I was too busy honing the more measurable literacy skills -- reading, writing, and speaking. But when we think about career and college readiness, listening skills are just as important. 101 Great Sites for Social Studies Class 1.) The Library of Congress is a great source to find historical documents, photos, art, maps, audio and video, artifacts and other items. The American Memory section organizes items based on topics, time periods and places of American history. The World Digital Library, a cooperative project with UNESCO, includes rare documents from around the world. 2.)

HISTORY OF SLAVERY The horrors of the slave trade do not go unnoticed in England, however hard the traders try to justify their activities (even, preposterously, proclaiming the care and consideration which they show to their precious cargo). The first sharp prick to the public's conscience comes in 1688 with the publication of Aphra Behn's novel Oroonoko (about the sufferings of an African prince and his loved one, transported by the English to slavery in Surinam). By this time the Quakers are already prominent in their condemnation of this inhuman trade, with the society's founder, George Fox, speaking strongly against it. In 1772 there is a landmark case when Lord Mansfield frees James Somerset, belonging to an American master, on the grounds that he has set foot in England.

13 Colonies - New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies The 13 Colonies Chart The 13 Colonies chart shows the New England, Middle and Southern Colonies: The Mayflower in Plymouth Harbor The New England Colonies The 13 Colonies - Facts and Information about the New England Colonies Information and facts about the 13 colonies.

Related:  U.S. Historyhistorical or governmentalAmerican Revolution USI.6American Revolution