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Carl Jung speaks about Death

Carl Jung speaks about Death

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LOxlZm2AU4o

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Somatic Voicework Teachers Association Singing can be a path to spiritual growth. This takes the concept of spirituality in its broadest context. The human spirit lives through the characteristics of one’s life. Honesty, loyalty, truthfulness, courage, dedication, perseverance, patience, compassion, responsibility, humility…..these are qualities that reflect the highest and best attributes of humanity. The artistic path will put you in touch with these aspects of yourself (and their reflected negatives) if you are someone who strives to achieve the highest and best goals that are possible.

Understanding Wisdom and the Wheel - Wheel Wisdom is the ability to live in a chaotic world. It requires the "knowledge behind the knowledge," which means an understanding of the hardware of the mind, its structure, as opposed to the software - the particular languages, sciences, and religions which the mind creates. This is knowledge of Chaos, of the real world in which we all live, and how to find the hidden universal order, the fractal pattterns, which lie behind it. The order follows number and can be found by many methods that take you beyond yourself, including music. By understanding the knowledge behind the knowledge you can make sense beyond meaning. Making sense of everything for yourself allows you to make the appropriate choices in the chaotic world of chances, to self-evolve towards the infinite.

Thanatos In myth and poetry "And there the children of dark Night have their dwellings, Sleep and Death, awful gods. The glowing Sun never looks upon them with his beams, neither as he goes up into heaven, nor as he comes down from heaven. And the former of them roams peacefully over the earth and the sea's broad back and is kindly to men; but the other has a heart of iron, and his spirit within him is pitiless as bronze: whomsoever of men he has once seized he holds fast: and he is hateful even to the deathless gods." [3] Shadow (psychology) In Jungian psychology, the shadow or "shadow aspect" may refer to (1) an unconscious aspect of the personality which the conscious ego does not identify in itself. Because one tends to reject or remain ignorant of the least desirable aspects of one's personality, the shadow is largely negative, or (2) the entirety of the unconscious, i.e., everything of which a person is not fully conscious. There are, however, positive aspects which may also remain hidden in one's shadow (especially in people with low self-esteem).[1] Contrary to a Freudian definition of shadow, therefore, the Jungian shadow can include everything outside the light of consciousness, and may be positive or negative. "Everyone carries a shadow," Jung wrote, "and the less it is embodied in the individual's conscious life, the blacker and denser it is."[2] It may be (in part) one's link to more primitive animal instincts,[3] which are superseded during early childhood by the conscious mind.

What Is Chaos Magic? What Is Chaos Magic? "All great things must first wear a terrifying and monsterous mask, in order to inscribe themselves on the hearts of humanity." -- Fredrick Nietzsche The words "Chaos Magic" reverberate with mystery and intrigue. It's rather safe to assume that this was intentional on the part of those who originally coined the term. Of course, when Gerald Gardener came up with his reconstruction of European Paganism in the 1950's and called it "witchcraft," he must have been equally well aware of the effect that that term would have on his contemporaries.

The Art Story: Art Critic – Clement Greenberg "Where the Old Masters created an illusion of space into which one could imagine walking, the illusion created by a Modernist is one into which one can look, can travel through, only with the eye." Clement Greenberg Clement Greenberg was probably the single most influential art critic in the twentieth century. Although he is most closely associated with his support for Abstract Expressionism, and in particular Jackson Pollock, his views closely shaped the work of many other artists, including Helen Frankenthaler, Morris Louis, and Kenneth Noland. His attention to the formal properties of art - color, line, space and so forth - his rigorous approach to criticism, and his understanding of the development of modern art - although they have all been challenged - have influenced generations of critics and historians. Childhood

A little nouveau » Art I came accross these watch sculptures by Dominic Wilcox today, and I think they’re pretty much the most brilliant things ever made: “Adventures of a young vegetarian OR Pigs shall fly. “A small girl attempts to stop a butcher chopping up a pig by hanging on his arm while the pig floats away”. “The numbers and hands of a watch are swept away by a watch sweeper.” Pocahontas Pocahontas was captured by the English during Anglo-Indian hostilities in 1613, and held for ransom. During her captivity, she converted to Christianity and took the name Rebecca. When the opportunity arose for her to return to her people, she chose to remain with the English. In April 1614, she married tobacco planter John Rolfe, and in January 1615, bore him a son, Thomas Rolfe. Pocahontas's marriage to Rolfe was the first recorded interracial marriage in North American history.[4]

Individuation The principle of individuation, or principium individuationis,[1] describes the manner in which a thing is identified as distinguished from other things.[2] The concept appears in numerous fields and is encountered in works of Carl Jung, Gilbert Simondon, Bernard Stiegler, Friedrich Nietzsche, Arthur Schopenhauer, David Bohm, Henri Bergson, Gilles Deleuze, and Manuel De Landa. Usage[edit] The word individuation is used differently in philosophy than in Jungian psychology. Mind Magic: Using the Law Of Attraction to Make Sex Sizzle Do you know The Secret? Oprah claims she does–and so do millions of others around the world who are fascinated with the “Law of Attraction.” So what could be a better time than right now–the eve of 2013–to take a long look at how this knowledge can enliven life, love, and sexuality in the New Year. In her bestselling book “The Secret,” author Ronda Byrne draws upon expert anecdotes and borrowed bits of quantum theory to suggest that the Law of Attraction (let’s call it LoA for short) enables us to have everything we want in life if we understand its rules.

Peinture : expressionnisme abstrait au MOMA New York More than sixty years have passed since the critic Robert Coates, writing in the New Yorker in 1946, first used the term “Abstract Expressionism” to describe the richly colored canvases of Hans Hofmann. Over the years the name has come to designate the paintings and sculptures of artists as different as Jackson Pollock and Barnett Newman, Willem de Kooning and Mark Rothko, Lee Krasner and David Smith. Beginning in the 1940s, under the aegis of founding director Alfred H. Barr, Jr., works by these artists began to enter MoMA’s collection. Thanks to the sustained support of the curators, the trustees, and the artists themselves, these ambitious acquisitions continued throughout the second half of the last century and produced a collection of Abstract Expressionist art of unrivaled breadth and depth. Drawn entirely from the Museum’s vast holdings, Abstract Expressionist New York underscores the achievements of a generation that catapulted New York

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