background preloader

IATEFL 2018: Safe Speaking Environments - What? Why? How?

IATEFL 2018: Safe Speaking Environments - What? Why? How?
Published 9 April 2018 In our first post from IATEFL 2018, we’re sharing the talk from Professor of Psycholinguistics, Zoltán Dörnyei, on what exactly Safe Speaking Environments are and why you should care. The talk looks at creating a psychological environment in the classroom which might make students’ lives easier. Zoltán says that in order to facilitate speaking in the language classroom, we need to: Create suitable conditions in accordance with the main tenets of group dynamics, andApply the principles of safe speaking environments What conditions need to be in place so we can start implementing a safe speaking environment? Zoltán talks about group cohesiveness being a very important attribute, which determines the productivity of the group, and the degree of members’ engagement with the group. He looks at eight different factors that promote group cohesiveness, including cooperation, competition and teachers’ leadership styles. 1. 2. 3. See more recordings and articles from IATEFL.

https://www.cambridge.org/elt/blog/2018/04/09/iatefl-safe-speaking-environments/

Related:  How to plan a great lessonLearning and learnersHow to plan a lessonBritish counsel

Motivating speaking activities for lower levels Planning time has been shown to increase production in speaking tasks. Lower level learners often find it especially difficult to speak spontaneously, so these activities incorporate 'thinking time' during which learners can prepare for speaking by planning what they are going to say, and asking the teacher or using a dictionary to look up missing vocabulary. The following activities are relatively short, with minimal materials preparation time for the teacher. They are designed for use as a warmer or a filler in the middle or at the end of a class. 1. Definitions lists Assessment: Lower Stakes, Raise Retention Assessment is a hot-button issue in today's K-12 education landscape, especially when one places the word "standardized" in front. But not all tests and exams need raise hackles or blood pressure. Indeed, there is a certain kind of exam that has been shown to increase learning in the classroom without undue dread: low-stakes assessment. Retrieval-Enhanced Learning Henry Roediger III, professor of psychology at Washington University in St.

Writing and young learners Writing and Young Learners Writing can be an engaging, interesting and inspiring activity for young learners. Children are active learners and thinkers (Piaget 1965), learn through social interaction (Vygotsky 1978) and learn effectively through scaffolding by more able others (Maybin et al 1992), who can be adults or peers. Collaborative and well-planned writing tasks encourage the context for all of these characteristics to be fully exploited in the young learner classroom. Bradley - Scaffolding Academic Learning for Second Language Learners The Internet TESL Journal Karen Sue Bradley & Jack Alden Bradleykfksb00 [at] tamuk.eduTexas A&M University (Kingsville, Texas, USA) Introduction What is meant by the term scaffolding? "Scaffolding refers to providing contextual supports for meaning through the use of simplified language, teacher modeling, visuals and graphics, cooperative learning and hands-on learning" (Ovando, Collier, & Combs, 2003, p. 345).

Make It Count: Providing Feedback as Formative Assessment Providing students with feedback on written work can, at times, feel like a burden. Dozens (perhaps even hundreds) of papers clutter your desk, and commenting on each is nearly impossible. Still, we know, both from our experiences and from research, that feedback is essential. John Hattie, Professor of Education and Director of the Melbourne Education Research Institute at the University of Melbourne, Australia, believes that feedback must be timely, relevant, and action-oriented. The good news, according to Hattie, is that "students want feedback just for them, just in time, and just helping nudge forward." To that end, he encourages us to "worry more about how students are receiving your feedback . . . than increasing how much you give."

L1 Skip to content L1 is a speaker's first language. L2 is the second, L3 the third etc. ExampleA learner whose L1 is Spanish may find Portuguese and Italian easy languages to learn because of a fairly close connection between the languages. Total physical response - TPR Where is it from? How can I use it in class? When should I use it? Why should I use it in the classroom? Evaluating speaking For example, speakers need to pronounce individual sounds clearly, understand the functions of language, and follow the conventions of turn-taking. The second part of this article looks at whether these different elements can be evaluated formally, and what ways there are to do this. In the third part of this article we will look at how these competencies can be evaluated, with specific discussion of the IELTS speaking test. What speakers do Phonological features of speech Following the rules of language Paralinguistic devices Communicative functions Social meaning Conclusion What speakers do Speaking is a complex act with many different elements interacting to produce effective communication.

TeachingEnglish Skip to content You are here Home » Professional development » Teachers Motivating teenagers I will link three practical classroom activities to the ideas of American Psychologist Carl Rogers. The ideas of Carl Rogers Types of motivation and teenagers Ways to improve motivation:Journals - empathy Using photos - authenticity Music - acceptance The ideas of Carl Rogers Rogers (1957) outlined 3 attitudinal qualities that a teacher, or in his words, a facilitator, should have to assist the learning process. They are empathy (seeing things from the students' viewpoint), authenticity (being yourself) and acceptance (of students' ideas and opinions). Types of motivation and teenagers It is widely agreed that motivation has a great effect on a student's capacity to learn. Motivation can be broken down into extrinsic and intrinsic forms.

Testing and assessment It was all made worse by the fact that the chemistry teacher read the results to the whole class, from first to last place. My humiliation was complete. Students can have very negative reactions towards tests and it's no surprise when they too may have had experiences like this. Why testing doesn't work Reasons for testing Making testing more productive Learning from tests Alternatives to testing Conclusions Why testing doesn't work There are many arguments against using tests as a form of assessment:

Related: