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History of Newton's Papers (1727-1872) | Newton Project At his death on 20 March 1727,[1] Isaac Newton left papers relating to all areas of the intellectual pursuits he had followed since arriving at Trinity College, Cambridge, in the summer of 1661.[2] His friend, relative by marriage (to Newton's half-niece Catherine Barton) and successor at the Mint, John Conduitt, posted a bond for Newton's debts and claimed entitlement to this material, Newton having died intestate. As is evident from a number of manuscripts adorned with Conduitt's notes and corrections -- for example the manuscript of 'An historical account of two notable corruptions of Scripture in a Letter to a Friend' (now New College, Oxford, Ms. 361.4) -- he took a serious scholarly interest in the papers he had acquired, although this was also partly directed towards the possibility of their publication. Continue reading about the donation of Newton's scientific papers to Cambridge University in 1872 [12] S. [14] J. [15] D. [16] F.

Extreme Weather 2011 A year for the record books From extreme drought, heat waves and floods to unprecedented tornado outbreaks, hurricanes, wildfires and winter storms, a record 14 weather and climate disasters in 2011 each caused $1 billion or more in damages — and most regrettably, loss of human lives and property. NOAA's National Weather Service has redoubled its efforts to create a "Weather-Ready Nation", where vulnerable communities are better prepared for extreme weather and other natural disasters. NOAA forecasts, advisories, watches, warnings and community-based preparedness programs have been and will continue play an even greater role in enhancing the economy and saving lives. A Weather-Ready Nation is one in which businesses, governments and the public are armed with accurate forecasts and other critical information on which to make smart decisions to protect life and property when severe weather threatens. Get historical and current billion-dollar disaster information from NOAA's NCDC »

Open Culture NSDL.org - National Science Digital Library Stellarium Game for science - Virtual world devoted to science, technology and free educational games online Frozen Planet: Explore the polar regions Click on the image below to start exploring the Arctic and Antarctic. You can access geographic information provided by Arctic and Antarctic experts, watch videos of the wildlife in each region, and see important historical events as people explore the polar regions. Copyrighted image Credit: The Open University Launch Frozen Planet 9 Special thanks to British Antarctic Survey 10 for their assistance in developing this interactive map. Please note: If you've arrived at this page looking for our Frozen Planet poster, thank you for your interest, but unfortunately, demand for this item was very high and we have now exhausted our current supplies. More about Frozen Planet

2012 March 12 - The Scale of the Universe Interactive Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2012 March 12 The Scale of the Universe - Interactive Flash Animation Credit & Copyright: Cary & Michael Huang Explanation: What does the universe look like on small scales? Tomorrow's picture: dust before galaxies Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important NoticesA service of:ASD at NASA / GSFC& Michigan Tech.

3D 360 interactive education images Free video lectures,Free Animations, Free Lecture Notes, Free Online Tests, Free Lecture Presentations

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