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World of Better Learning

World of Better Learning

https://www.cambridge.org/elt/blog/

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Current trends in ELT (UK) Around 25 years ago, when I worked at International House London, I used to teach a course called ‘Current Trends in ELT’. I no longer have records of the time so I can’t be 100% sure what was included in the course, but task-based learning, the ‘Lexical Approach’, the use of corpora, English as a Lingua Franca, learner autonomy / centredness, reflective practice and technology (CALL and CD-ROMs) were all probably part of it. I see that IH London still offers this course (next available course in January 2021) and I am struck by how similar the list of contents is. Only ‘emerging language’, CLIL, DOGME and motivation are clearly different from the menu of 25 years ago. The term ‘current trends’ has always been a good hook to sell a product. Each year, any number of ELT conferences chooses it as their theme.

19 Successful Online English Teachers Share Their Tips and Resources for Planning Online Lessons Thanks to everyone who contributed! I receive A LOT of emails from online teachers (and online teachers to be) about planning; namely, what they should include in their lessons and what resources they should use. As there are many areas of English and different teaching methods, there is no one-size-fits-all solution. Resources for Teaching English Online Want to start teaching English or any language online?Here are all the resources that you need to be a freelance teacher. I’ll update this page often and include my posts and other links. If you feel that there is something else that can be added then please get in contact. Note that most of these links will be affiliate links. If you decide to purchase something, then I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.

5 Hacks for “Taskifying” the Coursebook After a bit of a longer COVID chaos-enforced hiatus than I would have liked, this guest post is from Neil Anderson. It is a little longer than most posts here – but we will excuse that given the the wealth of knowledge and useful insights into incorporating more of a task-based approach into our lessons. In all honesty, his blog (co-written with Neil McCutcheon) has saved me hours in lesson planning and is one of the few that offers lessons that I don’t feel the need to tweak! Is there a case against coursebooks? You could be forgiven for feeling that discussion of coursebooks – their pros and in particular their cons – has been done to death in recent years. It’s not, though, a topic that will disappear so long as we continue to use them as the basis of our language courses, whether in private language schools or primary / secondary education.

Teaching Online by Nicky Hockly and Lindsay Clandfield To celebrate the launch of their new book, Teaching Online, Nicky Hockly and Lindsay Clandfield share their 5 favourite activities for teaching English online. We find that EFL teachers are increasingly expected to offer elements of their courses online, but very often are not sure where to start, or how to teach online. That´s why we wrote Teaching Online – to provide teachers with exactly this sort of guidance. The book has advice about online tools to use, what part(s) of your course you could offer online, and above all, a great set of activities you can use to teach online. By teaching online, we mean that you and your students are doing the activity 100% online and at a distance from each other (not in a computer room together, or using a connected IWB in class!).

Fun > Self-evaluate your language skills! az bg bs ca cs cy da de el en es et eu fi fr fy ga gl hr hu hy it ka lb lt lv mk nl nn pl pt ro ru sk sl sq sr sv tr About What is it? Why a European Day of Languages? Moving into the polyglot age What happens after the story? – Cécile Lainé As a teacher who loves using Story Listening and Reading to facilitate language acquisition, the question I get asked the most is: “What happens after the story?” I am excited to provide a response in this post. Ready? Nothing has to happen after the story. Katherine Bilsborough: Lesson plans – less is more You can travel without a list of course but you will avoid a few problems if you spend a bit of time planning – not a whole week though. That would be silly. A few minutes should be enough. Pre-empting problems will bring peace of mind and when it comes to teaching, this is a major defence against burnout and work stress. New teachers who have had training will have been evaluated and assessed on their lesson plans. They will spend hours preparing a 45-minute lesson.

Quiz your English Key features: Go head-to-head with other players from around the world, challenge your friends through social media, and quiz your English language skills.Battle it out over a range of general English topics and grammar, or brush up ready for your test by selecting an exam-specific topic.Earn Achievements as you progress - how far can you go?Play for free, or make in-app purchases to reveal exclusive new content packs.Content developed by Cambridge Assessment English, the producer of IELTS.

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