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Wunderland in 4 minutes - model building - model railway Hamburg

Wunderland in 4 minutes - model building - model railway Hamburg
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A Year in the Life of a Full-Time Traveler You are here: Home / Blog / A Year in the Life of a Full-Time Traveler All my life, I’ve dreamed of traveling the world. And in 2011, I achieved what I once thought was impossible without winning the lottery: I became a full-time traveler. And it wasn’t how I pictured. You DON’T need to be insanely rich to travel the world. So I may not be able to jet anywhere I want at a moment’s notice. Here is what a year in the life of a full-time traveler looks like! January: Thailand, Laos, Vietnam I rang in 2011 on Khao San Road in Bangkok. There was a two-day interlude in overrated Luang Prabang, and then I entered Vietnam (not without almost getting refused to the border). After recovering, I got to know Hanoi better — drinking snake blood was one way — and then experienced Halong Bay on the greatest party cruise of all time! February: Vietnam, Cambodia After returning to Hanoi, I hopped on an overnight bus to the imperial capital of Hue. March: Cambodia, Thailand, Singapore, Indonesia I was home.

How to Make Money While Traveling Wanna travel for a long period of time but have no money to do so? No ideas how to sustain your finances on the road? There are tons of ways to refuel your travelling funds as long as you have the means to do so. From teaching English in Spain to working as a dive instructor in Borneo, here are some tips to help you get started. Visa Requirements Depending on how long you would like to stay in the specific destination, work could mean a short-term bar job or a contractual professional position abroad. 1. These temporary jobs abroad are usually suitable for young and energetic individuals looking for a new experience after graduation. 2.Internship Recent graduates might find an internship abroad an amazing opportunity for both their personal and professional development. 3. A popular choice among many, it is rather easy to obtain a teaching job especially if you are a native speaker. 4. Although most volunteering positions are unpaid, you can still find some that offer a humble stipend.

Thasos Grece Villa Epecuen: The Town That Was Submerged For 25 Years Back in the 1920s, a tourist village named Villa Epecuen was established along the shore of Lago Epecuen, a salt lake some 600 kilometers southwest of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Lago Epecuen is like most other mountain lakes, except for one important difference. It has salt levels second only to the Dead Sea, and ten times higher than any ocean. Lago Epecuen’s therapeutic powers have been famous for centuries. By late nineteenth century, the first residents and visitors started to arrive to Villa Epecuen and set up tents on the banks. Around the same time, a long-term weather event was delivering far more rain than usual to the surrounding hills for years, and Lago Epecuen began to swell. Nearly 25 years later, in 2009, the wet weather reversed and the waters began to recede. No one returned back to the town, except 81-year-old Pablo Novak who is now Villa Epecuen’s sole resident. “I am OK here. The road leading to the cemetery of Carhue, near Villa Epecuen, at sunset on May 4, 2011.

Splash out: the world’s most amazing waterfalls The bigger they are, the harder they fall – feel the power of the planet's mightiest and most beautiful waterfalls. 1. Victoria Falls, Zambia/Zimbabwe Image by MAZZALIARMADI.IT Explorer David Livingstone could be accused of dampening expectations by naming these falls after England's doughy queen: dour and staid they're not. Although flow is greatest between April and June, the best time for sunset photography is arguably October to December, when spray is not too heavy. 2. Image by Artur Staszewski Let's hear you shout it: Waterfalls are fun! Experience the falls on the Maid of the Mist, which sails from April to October. 3. Image by Mike Knell Elemental, my dear Watson! For an atmospheric approach, catch the historic cable railway alongside the falls, running from Willingen mid-May to early October. 4. Image by sorenriise These remote falls may not be the highest, the heaviest or the most famous – but they're probably the wildest. 5. Image by SF Brit 6. Image by jankgo 7. Image by aschaf 8. 9.

The Mysterious Dancing Forest of Kaliningrad Located on the thin Curonian Spit that splits the Curonian Lagoon from the Baltic Sea, lies one of the strangest natural phenomena on Earth. Known as the Dancing Forest by caretakers of Curonian Spit National Park and as the Drunken Forest, by locals, this unusual pine forest is made of trees of various shapes, most of them twisted in circles and spirals, along the ground. According to tourists, the Dancing Forest looks more like a site near Chernobyl, with 20-year-old pines tied into natural knots and loops, like lumpy contortionists. A few years ago, the park manager invited students from local universities to conduct studies, and get to the bottom of the mystery. Since then, several theories emerged, including one suggested by a psychic who said the forest is located on a spot where massive amounts of positive and negative energies collide. Whatever the reason, the Dancing Forest of Kaliningrad is definitely an interesting site, especially if you’re into strange natural phenomena.

12 of the World’s Most Mysterious Monuments & Ruins 12 of the World’s Most Mysterious Monuments & Ruins Article by Steph, filed under Abandoned Places in the Architecture category. Around the world, in places as diverse as Homestead, Florida and Yonaguni, Japan stand monuments and ruins whose origins are shrouded in mystery. Nobody knows exactly why Stonehenge was built, how a set of manmade ruins came to be submerged deep in the ocean or who commissioned a giant carved granite set of post-apocalyptic instructions for rebuilding society on a remote hill in Georgia. Monumental Instructions for the Post-Apocalypse (images via: Wired) On a barren knoll in northeastern Georgia stands one of the world’s most bizarre and mysterious monuments. Lake Michigan Stonehenge (image via: io9) A group of researchers using sonar to look for shipwrecks at the bottom of Lake Michigan got quite a surprise when they found what appears to be an ancient Stonehenge-like structure 40 feet beneath the surface of the water. Underwater Ruins in Japan (images via: Hottnez)

The Other Mystery of Easter Island Moai statues Easter Island is branded into popular consciousness as the home of the mysterious and towering moai statues, but these are not the only curiosity the South Pacific island holds. Where the moai are fascinating for their unknown purpose and mysterious craftsmen, the island's lost language of Rongorongo is equally perplexing. The unique written language seems to have appeared suddenly in the 1700s, but within just two centuries it was exiled to obscurity. Known as Rapa Nui to the island's inhabitants, Rongorongo is a writing system comprised of pictographs. In 1864, Father Joseph Eyraud became the first non-islander to record Rongorongo. Some time later, Bishop Florentin Jaussen of Tahiti attempted to translate the texts. In 1886 Paymaster William Thompson of the ship USS Mohican became interested in the pictographic system during a journey to collect artifacts for the National Museum in Washington. An Indus valley connection? A Rongorongo Tablet

Silencio Magical Uba Jabuticaba Tree Lavender fields of France Jabuticaba The Jabuticaba (Portuguese pronunciation: [ʒabutiˈkabɐ or ʒabutʃiˈkabɐ]) (Plinia cauliflora) is a fruit-bearing tree in the family Myrtaceae native to Minas Gerais and São Paulo states in southeastern Brazil. Related species in the genus Myrciaria, often referred to by the same common name, are native to Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay, and Bolivia. The tree is grown for its purplish-black, white-pulped fruits; they can be eaten raw or be used to make jellies and drinks (plain juice or wine). Other common names include Brazilian Grape Tree, Jaboticaba, Jabotica, Jabuticabeira, Guaperu, Guapuru, Hivapuru, Sabará and Ybapuru (Guarani). Description[edit] Tree[edit] Jabuticaba tree Fruit[edit] The fruit is a thick-skinned berry and typically measures 3–4 cm in diameter. Leaves of Plinia cauliflora Several potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory anti-cancer compounds have been isolated from the fruit.[3] One that is unique to the fruit is jaboticabin. Cultural aspects[edit] References[edit]

Colosso dell'appennino di giambologna

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