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Antonin Dvorak - New World Symphony (Full)

Antonin Dvorak - New World Symphony (Full)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETNoPqYAIPI

Related:  Late Romantic era composers (1840-1859)

Edvard Grieg Edvard Grieg (1888) Edvard Hagerup Grieg (Norwegian: [ˈɛdʋɑrd ˈhɑːɡərʉp ˈɡrɪɡ]; 15 June 1843 – 4 September 1907) was a Norwegian composer and pianist. He is widely considered one of the leading Romantic era composers, and his music is part of the standard classical repertoire worldwide. His use and development of Norwegian folk music in his own compositions put the music of Norway in the international spectrum, as well as helping develop a national identity, much like Jean Sibelius and Antonín Dvořák did in Finland and Bohemia respectively.[1] Antonin Dvorak – Symphonie N°9 « Du Nouveau Monde » – 4. Allegro Con Fuoco Antonin Dvorak (1841-1904), ou plutôt Antonín Dvořák est un compositeur Austro-Hongrois, qui fait encore aujourd’hui la fierté de la République Tchèque puisqu’il a grandi en Bohème. Pourtant c’est aux Etats-Unis qu’il a écrit son chef-d’oeuvre le plus populaire: la Symphonie N°9, dite « Du Nouveau Monde ». C’est plus précisément au Carnegie Hall (New-York); en 1893, que Dvorak donne la première représentation de cette symphonie dont le succès foudroyant ne s’est jamais démenti. Tout au long de la symphonie, Dvorak nous donne le sentiment de dépeindre les vastes plaines, les attaques de convois, les chevauchées, les tipis, les gratte-ciels… Il reconnut même s’être inspiré de rythmes indiens!

BROR GUNNAR JANSSON Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov Portrait of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov in 1898 by Valentin Serov (detail) Rimsky-Korsakov believed, as did fellow composer Mily Balakirev and critic Vladimir Stasov, in developing a nationalistic style of classical music. This style employed Russian folk song and lore along with exotic harmonic, melodic and rhythmic elements in a practice known as musical orientalism, and eschewed traditional Western compositional methods. However, Rimsky-Korsakov appreciated Western musical techniques after he became a professor of musical composition, harmony and orchestration at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1871. He undertook a rigorous three-year program of self-education and became a master of Western methods, incorporating them alongside the influences of Mikhail Glinka and fellow members of The Five.

Francisco Tárrega Francisco de Asís Tárrega y Eixea (21 November 1852 – 15 December 1909) was a Spanish composer and classical guitarist of the Romantic period. Biography[edit] Tárrega was born on 21 November 1852, in Villarreal, Province of Castellón, Spain. It is said that Francisco's father played flamenco and several other music styles on his guitar; when his father was away working as a watchman at the Convent of San Pascual, the child would take his father's guitar and attempt to make the beautiful sounds he had heard.

Giacomo Puccini Giacomo Puccini Giacomo Puccini (Italian: [ˈdʒaːkomo putˈtʃiːni]; 22 December 1858 – 29 November 1924) was an Italian composer whose operas are among the important operas played as standards.[n 1] Puccini has been called "the greatest composer of Italian opera after Verdi".[1] While his early work was rooted in traditional late-19th-century romantic Italian opera, he successfully developed his work in the realistic verismo style, of which he became one of the leading exponents. Family and education[edit] Puccini's birthplace, seen in 1984

The Mother Didge of Holland Lies Beijerinck the beginning: Lies Beijerinck, a.k.a. ‘Didge-mother of Holland’, has played the didgeridoo since 1993. Although classically trained in harp and cello, Lies developed her own style busking on the streets, and was soon discovered by the Amsterdam dance scene, subsequently playing with DJ Tiësto in front of 25,000 people. Lies is known for her powerful percussive style and clear harmonics, and is one of the finest exponents of the didgeridoo in the world.

Antonín Dvořák Antonín Dvořák Antonín Leopold Dvořák (/ˈdvɔrʒɑːk/ DVOR-zhahk or /dɨˈvɔrʒæk/ di-VOR-zhak; Czech: [ˈantoɲiːn ˈlɛopolt ˈdvor̝aːk] ( ); September 8, 1841 – May 1, 1904) was a Czech composer. Following the nationalist example of Bedřich Smetana, Dvořák frequently employed features of the folk music of Moravia and his native Bohemia (then parts of the Austrian Empire and now constituting the Czech Republic).

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Portrait of Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (/ˈpjɔːtər ɪˈliɪtʃ tʃɪˈkɒfski/; Russian: Пётр Ильи́ч Чайко́вский;[a 1] tr. Pyotr Ilyich Chaykovsky; 7 May 1840 – 6 November 1893),[a 2] often anglicised as Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky /ˈpiːtər .../, was a Russian composer whose works included symphonies, concertos, operas, ballets, chamber music, and a choral setting of the Russian Orthodox Divine Liturgy. Some of these are among the most popular theatrical music in the classical repertoire. He was the first Russian composer whose music made a lasting impression internationally, which he bolstered with appearances as a guest conductor later in his career in Europe and the United States.

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