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Stefon Harris: There are no mistakes on the bandstand

Stefon Harris: There are no mistakes on the bandstand
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The ZRI Project | ZRI Music The ZRI project The Red Hedgehog Tavern, Zum Roten Igel, ZRI was the pub where Brahms drank and smoked, and would have heard the gypsies play. We used the name to represent our aim of learning more about the music we love by re-imagining the place it came from. Although, for the minute, ZRI are concentrating on Brahms, we will apply the ZRI principle to other composers in the future. A typical atypical audience If you have a friend or a partner, who you wish would share your enthusiasm for classical music, a ZRI concert could be the gig you’ve been waiting for. If you’ve been put off classical music by the staid context in which it’s often performed, then ZRI might be the gig you’ve been waiting for. If you’re already an aficionado of classical music, a working musicologist, or a wandering Bohemian gypsy, then ZRI is almost certainly the gig you’ve been waiting for. Wherever you’re coming from, we’d love to see you. Book ZRI

Martial Arts Information - Martial-Arts-Info.com Jonah Lehrer Wasn’t the Only Journalist Shaping His Conclusions Finally and fatally, what ties the narrative together is not some real insight into the nature of Dylan’s art, but a self-help lesson: Take a break to recharge. To anyone versed in Dylan, this story was almost unrecognizable. Lehrer’s intellectual chutzpah was startling: His conclusions didn’t shed new light on the facts; they distorted or invented facts, with the sole purpose of coating an unrelated and essentially useless lesson with the thinnest veneer of plausibility. It’s the same way with the science that “proves” the lesson. Lehrer quotes one neuroscientist, Mark Beeman, as saying that “an insight is like finding a needle in a haystack”—presumably an insight like Dylan’s, though Beeman’s study hinges on puzzles. Consider another tall tale, this one from Lehrer’s previous book, How We Decide. Lehrer tees this up as a transition to a psychological study on overthinking. Unlike the books, Lehrer’s New Yorker pieces were thoroughly fact-checked. That wasn’t Lehrer’s approach.

Shuffler.fm How to See the World: Art of Travel; European and World Backpacking; On $25 a Day or Less Jonah Lehrer Resigns From New Yorker Amid Scandal | Dispatches from Pangaea It’s been a rough couple of months for the science Wunderkind. Jonah Lehrer resigned today from his post at the New Yorker after acknowledging that he fabricated quotes in his most recent book, Imagine. His publisher is pulling the e-book that contains the misquotations and is halting production of physical copies. Lehrer admitted that quotes that he had attributed to Bob Dylan “either did not exist, were unintentional misquotations, or represented improper combinations of previously existing quotes.” Jonah Lehrer, the educator who admitted he wasn’t too honest with his attributions. This news comes on the heels of a smaller scandal, in which Lehrer admitted to reusing or “self-plagiarizing” his own work in numerous published pieces without telling his editors. Lehrer issued an apology this morning: I understand the gravity of my position. What’s sad about Lehrer is the same thing that’s sad about Winona Ryder: neither had a glaring need that would have made deceit or theft necessary.

100 Ways to Discover and Enjoy Music UPDATE 12/10/13: We’ve released a follow-up to this post with 100 More Ways to Discover and Enjoy Music. Prepare yourself for another dose of Monday roundup madness! It’s time for another crazily comprehensive, yet carefully curated, look at an entire industry–the music industry to be specific. You might also like: exfm – See what’s trending. There’s more to this article! How to Get Cheap Flights  ( 8 pgs. 3 illus.) - Art of Travel - European and World Backpacking Chapter 4 Booking Strategies Large Internet Sites Student and Budget Specialists Domestic Bucket Shops Ethnic and Foreign Bucket Shops Courier Flying Round-the-World Tickets Charters Bumping To Gateways Glossary TWO HUNDRED YEARS ago the cost was seven years to a lifetime of servitude for average people making a one-way crossing of the Atlantic. Now it can be funded by a few days of waiting tables. When booking through an agent, always specify you want the "lowest possible fare," as there may be specials which do not fall under "economy" or "APEX." Often the best deals are offered directly by airline websites. Large Internet Travel Sites All listings are the result of experience, general budget travel knowledge, or research. Student and Budget Specialists While a few tickets require student or youth status, most do not. Domestic Bucket Shops Air Brokers International 323 Geary, Suite 411, San Francisco, CA 94102 tel. 800-883-3273 fax: 415-397-4767. Ethnic Bucket Shops Foreign Bucket Shops

Crush the "I'm Not Creative" Barrier - Jeff Dyer, Hal Gregersen, and Clayton M. Christensen by Jeff Dyer, Hal Gregersen, and Clayton M. Christensen | 10:50 AM May 7, 2012 Did you know that if you think you are creative, you’re more likely to actually be creative? This surprising fact pops up again and again in our research. In our database of over 6,000 professionals who have taken the Innovator’s DNA self & 360 assessments, people (entrepreneurs and managers alike) who “agree” with the survey statement “I am creative” consistently deliver disruptive solutions — by creating new businesses, products, services, and processes that no one has done before. They see themselves as creative and act that way. But what if you don’t see yourself as creative? This is an important question to ask because many — probably half — of you don’t think that you’re creative. The bad news is that if you don’t think you’re creative, our survey data say that you probably are not. The result? Associational thinking: I creatively solve challenging problems by drawing on diverse ideas or knowledge.

The Four Freshmen - Angel Eyes 20 Things I’ve Learned From Traveling Around the World for Three Years Gary Arndt is the man behind Everything Everywhere, one of the most popular travel blogs in the world, and one of Time Magazine’s “Top 25 Best Blogs of 2010.” Since March 2007, Gary has been traveling around the globe, having visited more than 70 countries and territories, and gaining worldly wisdom in the process. Today, I’ve asked him to share some of that wisdom. Enter Gary On March 13, 2007, I handed over the keys to my house, put my possessions in storage and headed out to travel around the world with nothing but a backpack, my laptop and a camera. Three and a half years and 70 countries later, I’ve gotten the equivalent of a Ph.D in general knowledge about the people and places of Planet Earth. Here are some of the things I’ve learned… 1) People are generally good. Many people are afraid of the world beyond their door, yet the vast majority of humans are not thieves, murderers or rapists. 2) The media lies. 3) The world is boring. 4) People don’t hate Americans. 6) Americans don’t travel.

Jonah Lehrer on How to Be Creative Trippy Animation (Dubstep Remix)

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