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Making Your Own Pattern: a tutorial

Making Your Own Pattern: a tutorial
Patterns aren't cheap. Seriously, I was browsing through through the look books at Hobby Lobby the other day and some of them were as much as $20. Tack that on to the price of fabric and other supplies and suddenly sewing your own clothing becomes very expensive. Thankfully, you can make your own patterns using your own clothing that you know to fit well. I'll show you how to make a simple blouse pattern using a top of my own. I used Scotch Postal Wrapping Paper as my pattern paper. I used paper because I like to lay my pattern piece down and trace the shape directly onto my fabric. Muslin fabric is another great material that would allow you to pin the pattern piece to your fabric. Lay your garment down on the paper and determine the middle of the top. Mark right above the collar and right below the hem. Draw a rough outline of one half of the top. When you get to the sleeve, do your best to fold it back so that you just see the armhole. Now for the sleeves. *Update*

Circle skirt calculator – for the drafting of full, half and 3/4 skirts. With bonus grading worksheet! | The Snug Bug Special Sunday greetings you naked molerats! Since you’re so naked, I thought you might want to make yourselves some nice little circle skirts. And perhaps, like me, you find yourself with little mole rat patterns just a touch on the small side. OK. Recently I’ve been plotting about two separate circle-skirt related issues in my head. For molerats who are unfamiliar with circle skirts, here’s the difference between the three styles. For a much more interesting comparison, here’s a full circle skirt. {image Whirling Turban} Here’s the oh, so lovely three-quarter circle skirt. And a slightly pixelated half circle skirt… {image Get Go Retro} The other circle-skirt related problem I’ve been mulling over has to do with grading up circle skirts. OK, I admit I usually grade up my circle skirts the ‘wrong’ way. My problem is (hopefully) solved! I made two little handy tools this morning – they both live in the same Excel file – in fact, in the same sheet! Okee dokee. Whew! OK! There we have it!

: Ghost-in-a-box I schemed up these little guys a while back, and a whole flock of them will be in the shop update on Tuesday. Back to work on dolls and such! Have a Happy Weekend, and I'll be back with more very soon. xoxo Beginner's Bias Tape Bag with Free Downloadable Pattern I promised you this free downloadable bag pattern when we offered up the Simplicity Bias Tape Maker Giveaway as a great first project for your Homemade Bias Tape, so here goes… I’ve made a couple so far, and I usually don’t like fabric bags (i’m a leather lover) but I actually adore these for summer. They are super quick to whip up (under an hour) and are also reversible, so you can get a couple different looks in one swoop. You could also use store-bought bias tape, like I did for the big one (oh, and you can blow up or shrink the pattern to make different sizes – Scarlet’s been using the littler one as her lunch bag). Either way I think it’s a sweet & simple summery project. Get the full Beginner’s Bias Tape Bag Tutorial and free downloadable pattern after the jump…Beginner’s Bias Tape BagThe smaller version is made with the following fabrics: Bias Tape – Heather Bailey Washday Ticking in Dandelion, Amy Butler Sweet Jasmine in Navy, and Kei Barkcloth Woodcut in Teal. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

The Promised Skirt Hemming Tutorial Step 1. Choose a good skirt to work with. This particular technique works best with wool-like skirts. Step 2. Step 3. Step 4. Step 5. Step 6. Step 7. Step 8. Step 9. Step 10. Step 11. Your final folding should look like this. Step 12. The key to getting a good blind hem is to barely catch the edge of the folded fabric. Step 13. All right, that's it. Edit: If you hem a skirt using this tutorial, be sure to let me know. Tutorial and Pattern: Rainbow Sunshine Plushie (and a little fair[l]y [ugly] tale about patents) I want to begin this tutorial with a little story. One day there was a little organic cotton rainbow be-ribbonedplushie that was sketched and then stitched with love in a very messy upstairs room in a home somewhere in Minneapolis. It was a happy little plushie, made all the more so by the creation of its 3 identical siblings who sat on a sunny windowsill with the little plushie, keeping it company. Three of these four happy little plushies were placed in an Etsy shop, where they could be adopted by a good family, where they might be mooshed and drooled on and thrown over the sides of a crib and loved by a baby new to this world, much like the little plushies. They sat in that little shop, anxiously awaiting their new family for not much more than a week, when suddenly a nasty, ugly, bullying corporate lawyer informed them they could not be placed for adoption because apparently they were infringing upon some stupid, damn patent or other.

Travel Accessories: Plenty of Pockets Tote When you're on the road, doesn't it always seems to be the ordinary, everyday things you are suddenly in desperate need of: gum, nail clippers, your headphones? I get a little panicky, certain I've left behind the most obvious items... as if perhaps I'm on an arctic expedition and won't see civilization for weeks. But the opportunity for replenishment doesn't matter; I want my stuff close at hand. That's the theory behind our handsome travel tote: plenty o' pockets to stash all your stuff. We offer a full set of pattern downloads below for the tote body as well as all the pockets. We recommend using a twin needle to do the decorative stitching on this project. Our tote uses a heavy, solid-color duck for the exterior, a fabric that is readily available at numerous outlets, including this pretty 7 oz. duck in brown from Fabric. com. The finished size of the tote is approximately 12½" tall x 11½" wide with 2" deep sides and base. Contributors Storage Solutions Related Articles

10 Beautiful Fabric Flower Tutorials It is spring! If the flowers are not blooming yet here is a round-up of awesome tutorials to help you make your own flowers! Here you will find 10 beautiful fabric flowers, but don’t miss these five fabric flower tutorials! 1. How to make lovely fabric flowers 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. ..And how about updating your spring wardrobe with this beautiful rolled rose bracelet. 10. Just had to add one more! 11. If you need more flowers don’t miss the round-up of crochet flower tutorials and these darling fabric flowers!

Cloth Doll Making by Runo Dollmaker All Free Sewing - Free Sewing Patterns, Sewing Projects, Tips, Video, How-To Sew and More Jelly Roll Floor Pillows Hi everyone! It’s Val over at PinkPlease! bringing you another double recipe. I am teaming up with the Fat Quarter Shop to help you with your Sherbet Pips collection (or any other Moda fabric) so that you can make a few pillows of your very own. One Sherbet Pips Jelly Roll by Aneela Hoey 2 1/2 yards of fabric for the pillow bottom 1/2 yard of fabric for the piping 6/32″ Cotton Piping (95″ long for the small pillow and 140″ long for the larger pillow) 2 packages of 1 ½” Cover Button Kits (You will need to make 4 fabric covered buttons) Stuffing (4 bags of 24oz. poly-fil will fill both pillows. Fishing Wire or Super Strong Beading Thread. One Extra Long Needle (I used a darning needle) ***Most seam allowances are a ¼”, unless indicated ***Read the entire recipe before starting. ***You may want to use a stronger needle (90/14) since it gets pretty crowded in the middle as you finish up the pillow top. Creating the large pillow 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Save the scrap you just cut! 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 10a. 11.

Everything Your Mama Made & More SINGER® SEWING CO. | Resources: Machine Needles Selecting the correct needle for your project is just as important as selecting the fabric, thread and stabilizer. There are different sizes and types of needles for different types of fabric. The European metric sizing system for sewing machine needles is numbered from 60 to 110. The American sizing system is numbered from 8 to 18. For both sizing systems, the lower the number the finer the needle and the higher the number the larger the needle. A good rule of thumb to keep in mind: the lighter the fabric the smaller the needle size and the heavier the fabric the larger the needle size. A full selection of SINGER® needles is available online in our NEEDLES section. Sewing Machine Needles Regular Point (Style 2020) needles are used for all woven fabrics. Serger/Overlock Machine Needles Regular Point (Style 2054-42) serger needles are used for all woven fabrics. Change the needle after sewing two to three garments or after hitting a pin.

The Seam Method of Pattern Alteration An innovative technique for pattern alteration that's simple to understand and easy to do, offering options other techniques don't. by Judith Rasbandfrom Threads #85, pp. 48-51 When I was studying pattern alteration in college, I learned that no matter what method you use to alter a pattern, when you're done, all that's really changed is the outline, or outer edge of the pattern. As my teachers and I explored this idea, we further proved that the closer you place the alteration to the seam or stitching line, the less distortion to the pattern there will be. No special tools neededClear a work surface, and gather the tools you'd need for any alteration session: tissue or other plain paper for filling in the cut pattern, scissors, markers or pencils, transparent tape, and a straight and a curved ruler, ideally in clear plastic so you can see the pattern through them. Alteration basicsThe following guidelines are useful no matter what alteration technique you're using. Drawing: Karen Meyer

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