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Color Theory For Designers, Part 2: Understanding Concepts And Terminology

Color Theory For Designers, Part 2: Understanding Concepts And Terminology
Advertisement If you’re going to use color effectively in your designs, you’ll need to know some color concepts and color theory terminology. A thorough working knowledge of concepts like chroma, value and saturation is key to creating your own awesome color schemes. In Part 1: The Meaning of Color1 of our color theory series, we covered the meanings of different colors. Here, we’ll go over the basics of what affects a given color, such as adding gray, white or black to the pure hue, and its effect on a design, with examples of course. Hue Hue2 is the most basic of color terms and basically denotes an object’s color. Examples 3 The primary hue of the background and some of the typography on the Happy Twitmas website is bright red. 4 Using a lot of pure hues together can add a fun and playful look to a design, as done in the header and elsewhere on this website. 5 Pure red is a very popular hue in Web design. 6 Mix uses a number of pure hues in its header and logo. Chroma Saturation Value Tones

http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2010/02/02/color-theory-for-designers-part-2-understanding-concepts-and-terminology/

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Color Theory for Designers, Part 1: The Meaning of Color Color in design is very subjective. What evokes one reaction in one person may evoke a very different reaction in somone else. Sometimes this is due to personal preference, and other times due to cultural background. Color harmonies: Essential tips for selecting colors Color is often a critical factor in design. There are virtually millions of colors and shades to choose from. This makes choosing a project’s pallet complicated.

Color Theory For Designers: Creating Your Own Color Palettes In the previous two parts of this series on color theory, we talked mostly about the meanings behind colors1 and color terminology2. While this information is important, I’m sure a lot of people were wondering when we were going to get into the nitty-gritty of actually creating some color schemes. Well, that’s where Part 3 comes in. Here we’ll be talking about methods for creating your own color schemes, from scratch. We’ll cover the traditional color scheme patterns (monochrome, analogous, complementary, etc.) as well as how to create custom schemes that aren’t based strictly on any one pattern.

Color Models The purpose of a color model is to facilitate the specification of colors in some standard generally accepted way. In essence, a color model is a specification of a 3-D coordinate system and a subspace within that system where each color is represented by a single point. Each industry that uses color employs the most suitable color model. For example, the RGB color model is used in computer graphics, YUV or YCbCr are used in video systems, PhotoYCC* is used in PhotoCD* production and so on. Transferring color information from one industry to another requires transformation from one set of values to another. Test gratuit d'acuité visuelle How color vision works Human can distinguish colors when incoming light reacts with the cone cells in the retina of eye. There are three types of cone cells. Based on how they respond to light of wavelengths you will perceive the three basic colors; red, green and blue. The rest of the colors are perceived as a result of your brain combining the different cone cells.

A Simple Web Developer's Guide To Color I’ve never been a fan of color theory. I think it’s because I’ve always been a bit hopeless at it. I’d love to be able to sit there, color wheel in hand, and pick out complementary, split-complementary and triad color schemes, impressing all of my friends, family and clients in the process. But the theory has always eluded me, and, truthfully, I’ve never found it useful when trying to use color in my projects. Somewhat ironically, I’ve been finding that the better I get at choosing and using color, the better I become in the theory behind it. Of course, that doesn’t really help when you’re just starting out, does it?

CMYK color model Color printing typically uses ink of four colors: cyan, magenta, yellow, and key (black). When CMY “primaries” are combined at full strength, the resulting “secondary” mixtures are red, green, and blue. Mixing all three gives black. Lots O' Screen Colors "All we have to go upon are traditions and superstitions. These do not at the first appear much, when the matter is one of life and death, nay of more than either life or death. Yet must we be satisfied, in the first place because we have to be, no other means is at our control, and secondly, because, after all these things, tradition and superstition, are everything. Does not the belief in vampires rest for others, though not, alas! for us, on them? A year ago which of us would have received such a possibility, in the midst of our scientific, sceptical, matter-of-fact nineteenth century?

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