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Written in Bone - A Highly Unusual Case

Written in Bone - A Highly Unusual Case
In 2002, archaeologists uncovered an isolated grave just outside the log wall of a fort built on an island in the James River almost four centuries earlier. Who was buried there? Male skeleton (burial partially re-created for an exhibition) 1607, James Fort site, Jamestown Virginia. Image courtesy of: APVA Preservation Virginia/Historic Jamestowne The discovery mystified investigators. Unlike nearly all the other early fort burials they had found, this one once held a coffin. Smithsonian forensic anthropologists joined archaeologists from APVA Preservation Virginia who were excavating the site where the fort once stood—the first permanent English settlement in North America. A computer-generated image of the burial, based on evidence of nails recovered from the grave. Evidence at the Scene A gabled coffin and captain’s staff placed next to it indicate that the colonists who buried this man held him in high regard. Skeletal Evidence A Probable ID A Captain, No Longer Nameless

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The Tarahumaras: An Endangered Species : Mexico Culture & Arts Shep Lenchek Never conquered by the Aztecs and despite being defeated by Mexican armies, the Tarahumaras still consider themselves an independant nation. So strong is this conviction that in the Fifties they more than once took complaints directly to the United Nations. Perhaps the purest and most unmixed of any Indian tribe in Mexico, so little is known about them that their true name "Raramuri" was corrupted to "Tarahumara" by white men and never corrected. Human Intelligence: The Flynn Effect This page is now located at an updated address. Please update your bookmarks! The new address is posted below. You will be redirected to the new page in 15 seconds or you can click the link below.

The mystery of the labyrinth by Mirko Elviro This symbol represents a real mystery: in fact it appears in very different places and times. Its meaning is a mystery. Some researchers believe that it is a "ritual course", confining it to the religious-mystic field. Researchers uncover 8,000 years of human history hidden in the Middle East Which would be interesting, seeing as, when interpreted literally, the Bible also claims that the universe was created between 6000-8000 years ago. Which is problematic, to say the least. EDIT: Not to mention the mental gymnastics required to reconcile the (presumably) carbon dating of the earliest Mesopotamian settlements to 8000 years ago and the fact that that same dating methods go on to describe artifacts and fossils that are up to 40 000 years old. As I recall, Asimov hypothesized that the age of creation used in the Bible is actually linked to the point at which we (or rather Near Eastern peoples) began recording history in the form of writing. Not sure how strong his evidence was but it sounds reasonable intuitively.

Comics & Anthropology « Public Space, Information Accessibility, Technology, and Diversity at Oslo University College This comic book, in both its form and content, breaks with the traditional way of presenting ethnography. Traditionally, anthropology has been a written enterprise. Writing is perceived as the most scientific form of representation of social life. However, other forms of representation exist—not only in other disciplines (like art) but also within anthropology and social sciences. Anthropological findings have been presented in such forms as photography, film, and material exhibitions. Race I like race. I know it sounds odd, even politically incorrect. But I really enjoy the differences among people around the world. One aspect of this is all our different cultures. But another is all our different physical types. I get a kick out of reading and thinking about how we got to look the way we look, where our characteristics came from, why they are there at all.

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HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory As every experienced fieldworker knows, the most difficult task in social anthropological fieldwork is to determine the meaning of a few key words, upon an understanding of which the success of the whole investigation depends. – E. E. Evans-Pritchard Virtual Anthropology Lab - The Mind Project When completing this lab, you become a field anthropologist conducting a study in cognitive linguistics focusing on color terms. Virtual books introduce the physiology of color perception, the physics of light, and current methods of data gathering using a Munsell Color Chart. You will start by being a subject in your own study. You will then interview virtual informants from three different cultures. You will record your observations on a "data sheet" that you must print up before you get too far into the Lab.

Primatology Primatology is the scientific study of primates.[1] It is a diverse discipline and researchers can be found in academic departments of anatomy, anthropology, biology, medicine, psychology, veterinary sciences and zoology, as well as in animal sanctuaries, biomedical research facilities, museums and zoos.[2] Primatologists study both living and extinct primates in their natural habitats and in laboratories by conducting field studies and experiments in order to understand aspects of their evolution and behaviour. Primatologists often divide primates into three groups for study: dominant females, females and young, and peripheral males.[3] Sub-disciplines[edit] As a science, primatology has many different sub-disciplines which vary in terms of theoretical and methodological approaches to the subject used in researching extant primates and their extinct ancestors.

Tutorials - Google Apps Script These tutorials are designed to help you start using Google Apps Scripts more quickly. Some of these tutorials focus on the basics, some provide an in-depth analysis of a complex script, while others address specific nuances of the Google Apps Script system itself. Basics and working with Google Sheets Your First Script - This tutorial covers the basics of writing and executing a script, demonstrating how to create a Google Document and send an email. Your First Custom Function - This tutorial teaches you how to create custom spreadsheet functions which can be used as part of normal spreadsheet formulas. Sending Emails from a Spreadsheet - This tutorial shows how to use spreadsheet data to send emails to different people. Human behavioral ecology Evolutionary theory[edit] Human behavioral ecology rests upon a foundation of evolutionary theory. This includes aspects of both general evolutionary theory and established middle-level evolutionary theories, as well. Aspects of general evolutionary theory include:

Improve Your Search Skills with These Challenges Daniel Russell is a Google employee who studies how people search on the Internet. He's a search anthropologist. I had the pleasure of meeting him and learning from him at the Google Teacher Academy that I attended in 2009.

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