background preloader

De Libras a Kilogramos (Peso)

De Libras a Kilogramos (Peso)
The metric system originated in France in 1799 following the French Revolution although decimal units had been used in many other countries and cultures previously. Although there have been many different measurements and the definitions of the units have been revised, the official system of measurements of most countries is the modern form of the metric system which is known as the "International System of Units". Since other systems of measurement are still used around the world, such as the United States and the United Kingdom, this site aims to help people convert units of measurement with metric converters and conversion tables and to better understand alternative measurements that they are unfamiliar with. The measurement units are categorized into types (such as temperature conversion, weight conversion and so on) seen on the right-hand side which then lead to a series of metric conversion calculators.

http://www.metric-conversions.org/

Related:  Teaching resourcesescalasEnglishpapyrazziNorway

The world's English mania - Jay Walker What is the difference between "a hearty welcome" and "a cordial reception"? In a brief, action-packed history of the English language, Kate Gardoqui explains why these semantically equal phrases evoke such different images.In her talk, longtime English teacher Patricia Ryan asks a provocative question: Is the world's focus on English preventing the spread of great ideas in other languages? (For instance: what if Einstein had to pass the TOEFL?) It's a passionate defense of translating and sharing ideas.Biologist Mark Pagel shares an intriguing theory about why humans evolved our complex system of language. He suggests that language is a piece of "social technology" that allowed early human tribes to access a powerful new tool: cooperation.All it takes is a simple S to make most English words plural.

Must-see Historical Photos That Make You Stop And Think Sometimes, one simple picture can tell you more about history than any story you might read or any document you might analyze. 1. First selfie, ca. 1920: Nalle Puh citat på engelska - Winnie the Pooh citat Nalle Puh eller Winnie the Pooh som den egentligen heter, är ursprungligen skriven på engelska. När man översätter böcker från ett språk till ett annat händer det att en del av charmen och betydelsen försvinner. Därför har vi på denna sida samlat alla citaten på originalspråket. Nalle Puh citat på engelska

Amazing Metropolis Discovered in Africa is 200,000 years old! By Dan Eden for viewzone. They have always been there. People noticed them before. But no one could remember who made them -- or why? Until just recently, no one even knew how many there were. Now they are everywhere -- thousands -- no, hundreds of thousands of them! 469 Shares Share Tweet Email Unités de mesures anciennes genefourneau.com Buy this domain The owner of genefourneau.com is offering it for sale for an asking price of 499 USD! Related Searches This webpage was generated by the domain owner using Sedo Domain Parking. 64 Historical Pictures you most likely haven’t seen before. # 8 is a bit disturbing! These photographs all tell stories about the historical figures or events that they represent. Once taken simply to document their present, they now help us witness the past Many photographs only become iconic shots years later, once we understand their importance and historical context. From historical landmarks and famous people to the basic daily routines of the past, these pictures portray the past in a way that we can empathize with and understand more intimately.

For sale, baby shoes, never worn: Hemingway probably did not write the famous six-word story. Photo by AFP/Getty Images Quote Investigator is a terrific website that examines the provenance of popular quotations, which, as you may have noticed, frequently get misattributed online. On Monday, the site’s proprietor, Garson O’Toole, looked into a six-word fiction supposedly written by Ernest Hemingway: “For sale: baby shoes, never worn.” David Haglund is a senior editor at Slate. He runs Brow Beat, Slate's culture blog.

Related: