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Living Earth Simulator will simulate the entire world

Living Earth Simulator will simulate the entire world
Described as a “knowledge collider,” and now with a pledge of one billion euros from the European Union, the Living Earth Simulator is a new big data and supercomputing project that will attempt to uncover the underlying sociological and psychological laws that underpin human civilization. In the same way that CERN’s Large Hadron Collider smashes together protons to see what happens, the Living Earth Simulator (LES) will gather knowledge from a Planetary Nervous System (PNS — yes, really) to try to predict societal fluctuations such as political unrest, economic bubbles, disease epidemics, and so on. The scale of the LES, when it’s complete, will be huge. The timing of EU’s billion-euro grant is telling, too. Looking at the larger picture, the Living Earth Simulator is really an admission that we know more about the physical universe than the social. Read more at FuturICT Related:  Visual Understanding Environment

Cytoscape: An Open Source Platform for Complex Network Analysis and Visualization Calculus Online Book List of systems sciences organizations Systems science is the interdisciplinary field of science surrounding systems theory, cybernetics, the science of complex systems. It aims to develop interdisciplinary foundations, which are applicable in a variety of areas, such as engineering, biology, medicine and social sciences. Systems science and systemics are names for all research related to systems theory. It is defined as an emerging branch of science that studies holistic systems and tries to develop logical, mathematical, engineering and philosophical paradigms and frameworks in which physical, technological, biological, social, cognitive and metaphysical systems can be studied and developed. This list of systems sciences organizations gives an overview of global and local organizations in the field of systems science. Awards[edit] Research centers[edit] In America: In Europe: In Australia: In Asia: Center of Excellence in Systems Science,[4] IIT Jodhpur Systems biology[edit] Systems ecology[edit] Systems engineering[edit] Asia[edit]

Standard error of the mean When you take a sample of observations from a population, the mean of the sample is an estimate of the parametric mean, or mean of all of the observations in the population. If your sample size is small, your estimate of the mean won't be as good as an estimate based on a larger sample size. Here are 10 random samples from a simulated data set with a true (parametric) mean of 5. The X's represent the individual observations, the red circles are the sample means, and the blue line is the parametric mean. As you can see, with a sample size of only 3, some of the sample means aren't very close to the parametric mean. You'd often like to give some indication of how close your sample mean is likely to be to the parametric mean. Here's a figure illustrating this. Usually you won't have multiple samples to use in making multiple estimates of the mean. This figure is the same as the one above, only this time I've added error bars indicating ±1 standard error. Similar statistics Example Web pages

THE LAB Gephi, an open source graph visualization and manipulation software 9 Mental Math Tricks Math can be terrifying for many people. This list will hopefully improve your general knowledge of mathematical tricks and your speed when you need to do math in your head. 1. So, 9×9 is just 9x(10-1) which is 9×10-9 which is 90-9 or 81. Let’s try a harder example: 46×9 = 46×10-46 = 460-46 = 414. One more example: 68×9 = 680-68 = 612. To multiply by 99, you multiply by 100-1. So, 46×99 = 46x(100-1) = 4600-46 = 4554. Multiplying by 999 is similar to multiplying by 9 and by 99. 38×999 = 38x(1000-1) = 38000-38 = 37962. 2. To multiply a number by 11 you add pairs of numbers next to each other, except for the numbers on the edges. Let me illustrate: To multiply 436 by 11 go from right to left. First write down the 6 then add 6 to its neighbor on the left, 3, to get 9. Write down 9 to the left of 6. Then add 4 to 3 to get 7. Then, write down the leftmost digit, 4. So, 436×11 = is 4796. Let’s do another example: 3254×11. The answer comes from these sums and edge numbers: (3)(3+2)(2+5)(5+4)(4) = 35794. 3. 4.

List of systems engineering universities This list of systems engineering at universities gives an overview of the different forms of systems engineering (SE) programs, faculties, and institutes at universities worldwide. Since there is no clear consensus on what constitutes a systems engineering degree, this list simply identifies the college and department offering degrees and the degrees offered. Education in systems engineering is often observed to be an extension to the regular engineering courses,[1] reflecting the industry attitude that engineering professionals need a foundational background in one of the traditional engineering disciplines (e.g. civil engineering, electrical engineering, industrial engineering) plus professional, real-world experience to be effective as systems engineers. Undergraduate university programs in systems engineering are rare. Education in systems engineering can be viewed as Systems-centric or Domain-centric. Systems Engineering degrees in Europe[edit] In Europe: In the USA: See also[edit]

Particles found to break speed of light Trend map for 2010 and out to 2050 For the last few years Richard Watson of NowandNext has created annual trend maps based on city subway maps. This year he has been more ambitious, creating a highly detailed map with five time zones, ranging from 2010-2015 out to 2035-2050. For the previous three trend maps (shown at the bottom) I collaborated with Richard and we co-branded them with Future Exploration Network, however time pressures this year meant that I haven’t directly contributed to the 2010 map. It is still as rich and glorious as ever – spend some time delving into the trends ahead! – Ageing – Power shift Eastwards – Globalisation – Localisation – Digitalisation – Personalisation – Volatility – Individualism – Environmental change – Sustainability – Debt – Urbanisation Click on the images below for the original blog posts and full-size pdfs. 2009 Trend Map 2008 Trend Map 2007 Trend Map

Pearltrees Pauls Online Math Notes Leadership and Management in a Networked World

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