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The TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD Student Survival Guide

The TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD Student Survival Guide

http://www.lausd.k12.ca.us/Belmont_HS/tkm/

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EMINEM LYRICS - Mockingbird Yeah I know sometimes things may not always make sense to you right now But hey, what daddy always tell you? Straighten up little soldier Stiffen up that upper lip What you crying about? You got me. Hailie, I know you miss your mom, and I know you miss your dad When I'm gone but I'm trying to give you the life that I never had I can see you're sad, even when you smile, even when you laugh I can see it in your eyes, deep inside you want to cry 'Cause you're scared, I ain't there? Daddy's with you in your prayers No more crying, wipe them tears Daddy's here, no more nightmares We gon' pull together through it, we gon' do it Lainie Uncle's crazy, ain't he? [Chorus:] Now hush little baby, don't you cry Everything's gonna be alright Stiffen that upper lip up, little lady, I told ya Daddy's here to hold ya through the night I know mommy's not here right now and we don't know why We feel how we feel inside It may seem a little crazy, pretty baby But I promise mama's gon' be alright

tokillamockingbird-LitChart Author Bio Full Name: Nelle Harper Lee Pen Name: Harper Lee Date of Birth: 1926 Place of Birth: Monroeville, Alabama Fun Facts - 1920s Art and Architecture For The Decade The turn of the century saw early modernism in art, design, and architecture, which continued through to 1940 and the war. Skyscrapers were erected and hundreds of architects competed for the work. The first successful design was the Woolworth Building in New York. The Wrigley building, in Chicago, was designed by Graham, Anderson, Probst, and White. The Chicago Tribune Tower was designed by Howells and Hood.

Historical Background As of July 1, 2013 ThinkQuest has been discontinued. We would like to thank everyone for being a part of the ThinkQuest global community: Students - For your limitless creativity and innovation, which inspires us all. Teachers - For your passion in guiding students on their quest. Partners - For your unwavering support and evangelism. Parents - For supporting the use of technology not only as an instrument of learning, but as a means of creating knowledge. To Kill a Mockingbird: Plot Overview Scout Finch lives with her brother, Jem, and their widowed father, Atticus, in the sleepy Alabama town of Maycomb. Maycomb is suffering through the Great Depression, but Atticus is a prominent lawyer and the Finch family is reasonably well off in comparison to the rest of society. One summer, Jem and Scout befriend a boy named Dill, who has come to live in their neighborhood for the summer, and the trio acts out stories together. Eventually, Dill becomes fascinated with the spooky house on their street called the Radley Place. The house is owned by Mr. Nathan Radley, whose brother, Arthur (nicknamed Boo), has lived there for years without venturing outside.

Robert E. Lee Ewell in To Kill a Mockingbird Bob Ewell is the current head of a family that has been "the disgrace of Maycomb for three generations" (3.93). (Sounds like quite an honor.) Considered human trash by the Maycomb community, the Ewells live in a shotgun shack out by the dump. Calpurnia in To Kill a Mockingbird Touch Love Sure, everyone in the novel is filtered through Scout's perception. She's the narrator, after all. But we get the sense that Calpurnia in particular is colored by Scout's perspective—and her perspective sounds a little like Cinderella thinking about her wicked stepmother: She was all angles and bones; she was nearsighted; she squinted; her hand was wide as a bed slat and twice as hard. She was always ordering me out of the kitchen, asking me why I couldn't behave as well as Jem when she knew he was older, and calling me home when I wasn't ready to come.

Jeremy Atticus Finch (Jem) in To Kill a Mockingbird Obsessed Dill may be the brains behind the Finch kids' early attempts to draw out Boo Radley, but Jem is the one who takes action. He's the one who overcomes his fear to run up and touch the Radleys' front door, fiddles with the fishing pole to try to leave a note on Boo's windowsill, and spearheads the midnight raid on the Radley Place. Why does Jem want to see Boo so badly? Because he's a mystery right before their eyes, like the ones in the books he read?

Jean Louise Finch (Scout) in To Kill a Mockingbird Scout's Honor Scout may or may not be a lover, but she's definitely a fighter. At the beginning of the novel, fighting is her solution to everything: she goes after Walter Cunningham after she gets in trouble on his behalf on the first day of school, she beats up Dill when she thinks he's not paying enough attention to her, and she kicks a member of the lynch mob (where it counts, no less) when he grabs Jem. When news of Atticus's defense of Tom Robinson percolates down to the schoolyard, it's no wonder that she responds with her fists to the kids' ugly name-calling. So, why the short temper? Well, for one thing, she does seem to win her fights most of the time, so it's a technique that's working for her.

Monroeville, Alabama, To Catch a Mockingbird "Top secret," Mr. X whispered to me toward the end of my stay in Monroeville, Alabama. "Nelle is in town." By then, though, I was in on the secret. Three other people had also mentioned Nelle sightings that day.

American civil rights movement American civil rights movement, mass protest movement against racial segregation and discrimination in the southern United States that came to national prominence during the mid-1950s. This movement had its roots in the centuries-long efforts of African slaves and their descendants to resist racial oppression and abolish the institution of slavery. Although American slaves were emancipated as a result of the Civil War and were then granted basic civil rights through the passage of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth amendments to the U.S. Constitution, struggles to secure federal protection of these rights continued during the next century. Through nonviolent protest, the civil rights movement of the 1950s and ’60s broke the pattern of public facilities’ being segregated by “race” in the South and achieved the most important breakthrough in equal-rights legislation for African Americans since the Reconstruction period (1865–77).

African American Odyssey: The Civil Rights Era (Part 1) The post-war era marked a period of unprecedented energy against the second class citizenship accorded to African Americans in many parts of the nation. Resistance to racial segregation and discrimination with strategies such as civil disobedience, nonviolent resistance, marches, protests, boycotts, "freedom rides," and rallies received national attention as newspaper, radio, and television reporters and cameramen documented the struggle to end racial inequality. There were also continuing efforts to legally challenge segregation through the courts. Success crowned these efforts: the Brown decision in 1954, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Voting Rights Act in 1965 helped bring about the demise of the entangling web of legislation that bound blacks to second class citizenship. One hundred years after the Civil War, blacks and their white allies still pursued the battle for equal rights in every area of American life.

About the Great Depression About the Great Depression The Great Depression was an economic slump in North America, Europe, and other industrialized areas of the world that began in 1929 and lasted until about 1939. It was the longest and most severe depression ever experienced by the industrialized Western world. Though the U.S. economy had gone into depression six months earlier, the Great Depression may be said to have begun with a catastrophic collapse of stock-market prices on the New York Stock Exchange in October 1929. During the next three years stock prices in the United States continued to fall, until by late 1932 they had dropped to only about 20 percent of their value in 1929.

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