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How to Make a Three-Dimensional Wall Hanging

How to Make a Three-Dimensional Wall Hanging
Ready to craft? This project is so easy, anyone can do it. Before you start making excuses, let me tell you, I’d never painted before. Never used acrylics or done art on canvas. I can hardly even draw a straight line. Now that your excuses are gone, pick your colors and your theme and let’s get started! Need some ideas? Use different kinds of sticks. Maybe leave off the bird and use butterflies. This project should take two days. Day 1, Step 1 in creating your own three-dimensional wall art: Paint your canvases with some acrylic paint. Step 2: Leave the canvases to dry and start preparing your foliage. Step 3: If you plan to use an additional color on your canvases (I mixed some white and light grey to make the moon) you can go ahead and add that. See the final assembly tips on day two after the paint dries on Page Two! About Erica Mueller Erica Mueller has written 22 posts in this blog. Erica Mueller is a stay-at-home mom to two lively little boys. Pages: 1 2

Tissue Flowers Tutorial, No.2 - gingerandgeorge A couple of months ago, Jenny - the very lovely editor of PaperCraft Inspirations - asked me to work up a feature on different ways to use tissue paper. You can see the results in the September issue (on sale right about now), and alongside ruffles, twists, layers, buttons and twirly skirts, there's a miniature version of an old tissue-paper favourite. I made these flowers for Halloween a couple of years ago, and although the large scale can look fantastic on card projects, it doesn't leave room for very much else. By scaling it down, you create a much more versatile embellishment and your tissue supplies will stretch a little further, too. Tissue paper (plain or patterned) Scissors Ruler Pencil Thin wire (e.g. fuse or jewellery wire) Small button or circle of card PVA glue Measure and cut out two strips of tissue paper, each around 20cm long and 5-6cm wide. Cut a small piece of jewellery wire and wrap around the centre of your folded tissue. x

{DIY} Magnetic Chore Chart by Keeping Life Creative | Keeping Life Creative Thank you so much for the feedback on the magnetic chore chart! I’m pretty excited about it too. So as promised, here are the details on how I made the magnets. . . . Supplies: Chore Graphic Printout1-inch circle punchClear Glass PebblesMod PodgePaint BrushHot Glue GunStrong Magnets Start by printing out the chore chart graphics. Punch out each chore graphic using a 1-inch circle punch. Then brush a thin coat of Mod Podge over each punched chore graphic. {I’m using the “maid” graphic for “mom’s choice” or “mommy’s helper.”} Firmly press the glass pebble (flat side down) onto the modge-podged chore punchout. Brush a thin layer of Mod Podge over the back of the cutout to seal. Allow Mod Podge to fully dry, then hot glue a strong magnet to the back of each chore pebble. Completed chore magnets: If desired, laminate the “to do” and “done” strips for durability, and then place a magnet on the back as well. Hi!

Japanese Packaging Templates - Best Used With Card Stock or Color Paper I’m not sure how I discovered this awesome collection of packaging templates but I’m glad I did! Some professor or student at a japanese univeresity was nice enough to share all their packaging templates with the world! These are a few of my favorites and you can see all of them on their website. Every situation is covered! P.S. stumbleupon

Paper Filigree Snowflake Gallery I've switched over to using acid free paper and glue to make my paper filigree snowflake ornaments now. I figure there's no sense in putting this much work into something that might fall apart in a few years, and with practice, they're starting to get pretty enough that I'm planning to make quite a few of them. In my search for paper that will hold up over time, I was looking for archival quality paper, but there wasn't much available that wasn't too thick, or too yellow. I visited all sorts of art, craft, scrapbook, and office supply stores in my paper quest, but the pickings were pretty slim for archival paper in shades of silver and white, so I went with mostly acid free paper and will see how it holds up. The pictures don't show it very clearly, but the snowflake above on the right has both white and off white, and it adds an interesting antique look, or at least I thought so until my kids mentioned the old joke about not eating the yellow snow.

Photo-printed Hair Ribbon | Upcraft.it Robin over at inkodye.com just sent over this fantastic tutorial to showcase their fantastic photo-sensitive permanent dye. This product really ticks all of the boxes for me, because it works on so many different materials (including wood and leather), and it connects to my love of all things photographic. Here is Robin’s tutorial: Only with Inkodye can you create this incredibly easy and rewarding DIY project! Because Inkodyes are truly photographic you can use them with black & white negatives to create your very own photo-printed silk ribbon. Use your ribbon in your hair, around your waist on a summer dress or cut it into sections and give them away as adorable bookmarks! Total tutorial time: 15 minutes Used in this project: Inkodye Violet Materials. Making your own negatives. Prepare. Position. Pour. Brush. Place. Pin. Smooth. Take into the sun. Wait. Uncover. Wash. Dry. Enjoy!

Wine cork bath mat - Craftynest Inspired by CB2's bamboo bath mat I’m evidently on a hot-glue kick lately. This bath mat requires just three materials: shelf liner, hot glue, and 175 wine corks. It was inspired by CB2’s bamboo bath mat, which is perfectly lovely and affordable but too big for my tiny bathroom, hence this equally eco-friendly version. Yeah, but how durable is it, you say? How to make a wine cork bath mat Supplies 175 wine corks (plus a few extra to allow for mistakes)hot glue sticksnon-adhesive shelf liner (I used Duck brand Smooth Top Easy Liner in taupe, found at Walmart. Tools pocket knife (sharpened)cutting board (one that you won’t mind if it gets slightly damaged)rotary cutter and mat (or scissors)long ruler or yardstickhot glue guncoarse sand paper 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

DIY Junk Mail Clock! | I stumbled across this amazing recycled clock from Apartment Therapy and I just had to share it! I would love to make one but I can’t seem to find clock kit that is affordable (anyone know where I can find one?) Tutorial below!! What You Will Need: About 24 sheets of junk mail (magazine sheets, grocery store ads, newspaper, etc just make sure they are all the same sizePen or pencilScissorsClear tapeA long yarn needleEmbroidery flosstwo clear CDs (the kind that protect your CD 50 packs)CardstockBattery-operated clock mechanism with hands Steps! 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.Once done, you should have a full circle. 7. 8. 9. 11. Tutorial and all images were found here!! DIY TUTORIAL and a giveaway! Happy Monday everyone! Today I am going to show you how to make this necklace and introduce my first giveaway! Below are the steps to make this tulle necklace. And to win this necklace, just leave me a comment below! A winner will be announced on Friday. Good luck! Step 1: Pick out your fabric and beads. Step 2: Measure the fabric around a bead and then add an inch, this is where you will cut. Step 3: Cut the fabric the long way. Step 4: You should now have a long strip of fabric. Step 5: Sew the folded fabric at the open end. Step 6: You should now have a tube. Step 7: In order to turn the tube right side out, attach a safety pin to one end. Step 8: Feed the safety pin through the tube. Step 9: Once the tube is right side out, put a bead in the tube and center it. Step 10: Make a knot at each end of the bead. Step 11: Feed another bead into the tube and knot after the bead. Step 12: Sew the ends shut. Step 13: Add flower by gathering strips of the fabric together and sewing the center together.

not martha - to make: papier-mache easter eggs For Easter I made papier-mache polka dotted eggs. I created them using small water balloons and tissue paper then I filled them with candy and toys and sealed them shut. The egg can hold a surprising amount of candy and the tissue paper seems delicate making for a delightfully heavy and yet fragile object, much like real egg. You’ll need: water balloons (they make the egg-iest shape)white tissue paper (one sheet will make about three eggs)colorful tissue paper (one sheet will make many eggs, so you don’t need much)a 3/4 inch hole puncha paint brush you don’t care much aboutliquid laundry starcha sturdy shot glass to hold your egg while you’re working with ita way to hang the balloons to dryenough time to let these dry overnight, and a few hours to let them dry after filling and sealing them (you’ve been warned) A cutting mat, wheel cutter and straight edge will come in very handy but aren’t completely necessary. Note: I tried a few variations on the starch. Why the loop?

8 Cute DIY Bookmark Ideas bookmarks | 26 comments I don’t really use real bookmarks. I’m not sure why. They’re not expensive, or hard to make, but I tend to just pick up whatever to mark my pages. Old receipts, scraps of paper, a pencil, etc. (For those curious, I finished A Million Suns a couple days later and really enjoyed it! I’ve been eye-ing lots of super cute DIY bookmarks for the last few months that I’ve seen pop up around the web. The problem is, often my bookmarks fall out and I lose my page. I’m definitely going to keep these in mind for future gift giving opportunities after I’ve made a couple for our use at home. 8 Cute DIY Bookmark Ideas Bow Tie Paper Clips Using Fabric Scraps from How About Orange. No-Slip Bookmark Tutorial from Mary Janes and Galoshes. Fabric Button Paper Clip Bookmarks from Quiverfull of Blessings. Remember when I mentioned all those cute ways to use or make fabric rosettes recently? Page Corner Monster Bookmark Template from I Could Make That. About the Author:

Simply Vintagegirl Blog & Blog Archive & Tutorial: How to Make Lovely Fabric Flowers 29 May 2010 These elegant fabric flowers are very simple to make . . . and only take a few basic supplies. The finished product is delightfully lovely, and at times can look like a real flower! Every flower will turn out differently and that is part of the beauty! If you haven’t used those tea lights in a while, now’s the time! Supplies: · Synthetic Silky Fabric · Scissors · Candle (preferably a tea light) Additional supplies: · Needle and Thread, Glue Dots or Glue Gun · Buttons and/or Beads Directions: 1. Make the largest one’s diameter about half an inch larger than you want the diameter of the flower, as the petals will end up shrinking a bit. 2. You can also cut around the pattern and skip the drawing part, it just might not be as uniform . . . but with these, uniform isn’t necessary. 3. Cut just inside the drawn lines to make a circle out of the fabric. 4. Be very careful (please have adult supervision, this is rather dangerous), as it is very easy to get burnt. 5.

How to Make Clothing Buttons from Shrink Plastic... This tutorial is an old one of mine that’s too good not to share again. Since posting the first time, I’ve had lots of questions about these buttons which will hopefully be answered in this revised post. Equipment Some handy notes: 1. single hole, hole punch (like this one here). 2. 3. Okay.. lets get started! Tracing tips: You can use either coloured pencils or permanent pens. Words must be writted backwards in order to be readable. Shrinking the buttons: To shrink the buttons, you can use an oven or a heat gun (the kind used for embellishing). After the buttons have twisted and twirled, and are LYING FLAT, it’s time to take them out. Note: If the skrinking is taking too long, you may need to turn your oven up. Here’s a short little stop-motion to make sure you’ve got the gist of how easy this is! Shrink Paper {here} Circle Punch {here} Hole punch {here} Pens {here} Update: I’ve made a video to show how to shrink the buttons using a craft embellishment heat gun. Kimanh Hi my name's Kimanh.

On the Cheap: Scrapbook Paper iPhone Covers I found this clever trick on Pinterest the other week from Oops I Craft My Pants and had to try it for myself: iPhone covers using scrapbook paper! Now when I had my first cell phone in high school (the old Nokia), I probably had about 15 different cell phone covers that I would switch out to match my clothes everyday! I figure this scrapbook paper iPhone phone cover is an easy way to update my phone without spending all the cash! First thing I did was purchase a couple sheets of scrapbook paper from Michael’s. I also purchased a clear iPhone 4 cover from Best Buy. First thing I did was trace the scrapbook paper around the iPhone cover to get the basic shape. I cut out the main section just using a pair of scissors. For the camera hole I used a pencil to sketch in the hole that I had to cut out using an exacto knife…. and that’s about it! I’m really digging these fabric scrapbook pages! Oh, and that iPhone cover below? This is also a great way to get festive for the holidays!

- StumbleUpon Hi friends! I can't tell you how excited I am to be a creative guest on Ucreate today! I've been bubbling with excitement for weeks and have been scheming over what project would be Ucreate-worthy. I hope this one fits the bill...! First of all, I'm Autie and my friend Jen and I blog over at iCandy handmade. I'm a busy mom of 2 cute little kids and during nap time and bed time, I love to work on projects! The project that I thought I'd share with you today started out with these. The drawer does not open, but the cupboard door does...and it leaves about an inch of space to keep something in it...like art masterpieces of a few sheets of homework paper...hmmmm I bounced some ideas off of Jen, and this is what I came up with...I give you the Cupboard Door into Art Desk Tutorial I made one for each of my littles, and so far, they're totally diggin' it! If you want to know what I did, here's a quick run-down on what I did: I wanted to use the drawer as a supply holder. Here we are so far: -Autie

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