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Solar hydrogen home Michael Strizki

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Hydropower from Reuse Reused: a small stepper motor as found in a printer 2 discarded CD-ROMs a foam tray some long stick (I used a piece of 20mm diameter PVC tube from demolition) a LED one or two tie-wraps a small piece of scrap paper Non-reused: The only non-reused part is the hot melt glue (I recommend the low temp type, especially when working with kids). Tools: scissors, screwdriver to disassemble the printer (not shown), cutting pliers or desoldering tools for (optional, not shown). With a bit of luck the LED can also be found in the discarded printer. With even more luck you can find some discarded electronics with a LED standing tall on a printed circuit board, with most of its legs still intact, instead of mounted flush on the board. To keep within the spirit, you can also reuse tie-wraps: when you cut them loose carefully near the “ratchet”, you end up with a shorter, but still usable tie wrap. Now to start building, see the next step.

Nanotubes boost potential of salinity power as a renewable energy source In November 2009, Norwegian state owned electricity company Statkraft opened the world’s first osmotic power plant prototype, which generates electricity from the difference in the salt concentration between river water and sea water. While osmotic power is a clean, renewable energy source, its commercial use has been limited due to the low generating capacities offered by current technology – the Statkraft plant, for example, has a capacity of about 4 kW. Now researchers have discovered a new way to harness osmotic power that they claim would enable a 1 m2 (10.7 sq. ft.) membrane to have the same 4 kW capacity as the entire Statkraft plant. The global osmotic, or salinity gradient, power capacity, which is concentrated at the mouths of rivers, is estimated by Statkraft to be in the region of 1,600 to 1,700 TWh annually. The Statkraft prototype plant (and a planned 2 MW pilot facility) relies on the first method, using a polymide membrane that is able to produce 1 W/m2 of membrane.

Stored Solar :: Solar Assisted Electrolysis In a solar assisted electrolyser, commonly referred to as photo-electrochemical (PEC) generation of hydrogen, the required bias for water electrolysis is reduced. The additional energy required to split the water is provided by light from the sun at the blue end of the visible spectrum. The light is absorbed in the electrolyser by a metal oxide photo-electrode with nano-crystalline properties. In one early method of preparation using spray pyrolysis, the proprietary photo-material is deposited at elevated temperature in ultra thin layers to achieve the correct chemical and physical properties. Further developments are underway to significantly reduce the bias requirements and increase the spectral range of light absorbed by the photo-material to increase the efficiency of hydrogen production. Commercial partners are sought who can produce samples with very specific attributes. info (at) storedsolar.com

How to make batteries out of paint This article was taken from the January 2013 issue of Wired magazine. Be the first to read Wired's articles in print before they're posted online, and get your hands on loads of additional content by subscribing online. Researchers at Rice University, Houston, have created a battery made of paint. Assemble your paintbox Your paintable lithium-ion battery comprises five coats of paint, each representing a component of the battery: the lithium-titanium anode, two current-collectors made of a solvent, a cobalt cathode, and a polymer separator that holds the electrolyte. Layer the components The paints have to be applied in a certain order: the separator is in the centre, between the anode and cathode, and the two current collectors seal the sandwich. Seal them up tightly To seal the battery, you can use the aluminium foil found in coffee-sachet packaging. Power the results The battery now needs to be charged up with a 120-volt power supply.

Princeton’s nanomesh nearly triples solar cell efficiency There is huge potential in solar power. The sun is a giant ball of burning hydrogen in the sky, and it’s going to be sticking around for at least a few more billion years. For all intents and purposes, it’s a free source of energy. Sadly, humanity hasn’t been very good at harnessing its power directly. Led by Stephen Chou, the team has made two dramatic improvements: reducing reflectivity, and more effectively capturing the light that isn’t reflected. PlaCSH is also capable of capturing a large amount of sunlight even when the sunlight is dispersed on cloudy days, which results in an amazing 81% increase in efficiency under indirect lighting conditions when compared to conventional organic solar cell technology. The gold mesh that sits on top is incredibly small. The research team believes that the cells can be made cost effectively using a nanofabrication method that Chou himself invented over a decade ago. Now read: Is the slumping solar market temporary or a long-term trend?

Energy Maybe you want to save the planet, or maybe you just want to save money on your energy bills. Either way, Control4 home automation helps you conserve energy and save money. With plenty of options to manage all of the power-consuming products in your home, you’ll have lots of choices that allow you to reduce your impact on the environment. Set your house to “Away” when you leave—even if you’re just out for the day. If your automation system knows there’s nobody home, it can take steps to conserve energy for you. Only Organics Can Feed the Hungry World: Here's Why Students working on UGA's organic demonstration farm in summer 2012. (Photo: UGA College of Ag)A new approach to agriculture that combines the best in industrial production with organic and sustainable practices is the key to meeting the changing needs of a changing world, where resources are rapidly depleted by a growing population. "Are Organic Foods Safer or Healthier Than Conventional Alternatives?" The press weighed in with a bewildering range of instant reactions. The LA Times, on the other hand, pointed out in an editorial that the study largely ignored the ill effects of pesticide residues on conventionally-grown produce, and the hormones and antibiotic-resistant bacteria that taint factory-farmed meat and poultry. My own appreciation for organic agriculture dates to a conversation that I had years ago with a cotton grower from the Central Valley of California who told me about his switch from conventional to organic growing. No surprise there.

Solar Energy: Stanford scientists build the first all-carbon solar cell The Bao group's all-carbon solar cell consists of a photoactive layer, which absorbs sunlight, sandwiched between two electrodes. (Photo: Mark Shwartz / Stanford University) inShare6 October 31, 2012 By Mark Shwartz Stanford University scientists have built the first solar cell made entirely of carbon, a promising alternative to the expensive materials used in photovoltaic devices today. "Carbon has the potential to deliver high performance at a low cost," said study senior author Zhenan Bao, a professor of chemical engineering at Stanford. Unlike rigid silicon solar panels that adorn many rooftops, Stanford's thin film prototype is made of carbon materials that can be coated from solution. The coating technique also has the potential to reduce manufacturing costs, said Stanford graduate student Michael Vosgueritchian, co-lead author of the study with postdoctoral researcher Marc Ramuz. "Processing silicon-based solar cells requires a lot of steps," Vosgueritchian explained.

Solar Hydrogen Process Produces Energy from Water Special titanium oxide ceramics harvest sunlight and split water to produce hydrogen fuel. Researchers at University of New South Wales anticipate an energy-harvesting device with no moving parts within 7 years. A team of Australian scientists predicts that a revolutionary new way to harness the power of the sun to extract clean and almost unlimited energy supplies from water will be a reality within seven years. Using special titanium oxide ceramics that harvest sunlight and split water to produce hydrogen fuel, the researchers say it will then be a simple engineering exercise to make an energy-harvesting device with no moving parts and emitting no greenhouse gases or pollutants. It would be the cheapest, cleanest and most abundant energy source ever developed: the main by-products would be oxygen and water. "Based on our research results, we know we are on the right track and with the right support we now estimate that we can deliver a new material within seven years," says Nowotny.

…7 POINTS AGENDA ON GREEN ECONOMY FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT | I SEE A CHANGE Nigeria has been largely unfortunate not to have good and progressive political leaders, and this has resulted in perpetuating Nigeria in poverty and underdevelopment despite her huge GREEN ECONOMY. This persistent failure of the Nigeria System has produced a large army of bitter critics, who consistently point out the ills in the Governance of Nigeria and potter alternative ways of doing it better. Toward the Sustainable Development Conference [RIO+20] in Brazil. My 7 point agenda on green economy for sustainable development which I recommend for the President to look into will be: 1. Strengthen the voice of CSOs to demand accountability; 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. The above lists are my dream for Green Economy for Sustainable Development in Nigeria. Olumide IDOWU | Developmental Consultant | AIESEC Nigeria | olumide.idowu@aiesec.net | www.olumideidowu.blog.com | +2348133451818 This entry was posted on Wednesday, June 20th, 2012 at 8:30 pm and is filed under Uncategorized.

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