background preloader

T H E T O Y M A K E R

T H E T O Y M A K E R

Paper Modelz PawPeds Breaking News English Lessons: ESL Plans Teaching Current Events The Incredible Art Department Paper Toys - Paper Cut-Outs - PaperToys.com adespotologio Animal Coloring Pages, Teacher Worksheets, Birthday Party Ideas, Games & Downloads | Animal Jr. Boxpunx and more! Ragdoll, εκτροφείο γάτας Ragdoll, γάτες, γάτα, καθαρόαιμες γάτες, μακρύτριχες γάτες, κατοικίδια, Perla Free ESL Fun Games, Interactive Grammar & Vocabulary Games for Classrooms Handmade Flower Pots Once I spent a whole summer making handmade paper. I love the organic texture. Now I've found a way to make pots that look handmade without all of the work. Plus they cost about 9 cents each. Materials fiber pots lace cording white glue Pam kitchen spray gesso acrylic paints Tools blender or food processor mold paint brush Tear one of the pots into dime sized pieces. Place paper towels in a strainer and drain the paper mixture. When the molded object is dry, glue it to the front of the pot. Saturate some cording with white glue. Coat the pot in gesso and allow to dry. I painted the pot, embellishments and all, with my base color, blue. Normally I use brown shoe polish to antique things but this time I watered down white acrylic paint and brushed it all over my pot which I think alludes to the lime that forms on pots. Plant flowers in them.

Lucky Cats - Maneki Neko Maneki Neko -- The Legend This is the legend of the Maneki Neko: In the 17th century, there was a rundown and poverty-stricken temple in Tokyo. The temple's priest was very poor, but he shared what little food he had with his pet cat, Tama. One day, a wealthy and important man was caught in a storm while hunting and he took refuge under a big tree near the temple. As a result, the wealthy man became friends with the poor priest, and the temple became prosperous. When Tama died he was buried in the Goutokuji Temple's cat cemetery with respect and love, and the Maneki Neko was made in honor of him. Maneki Neko is Japanese for "beckoning cat." Whether you believe in this kind of thing or not, he's a cute little cat with a gracious message, and he does brighten up a home or a web page! You are welcome to take a Maneki Neko for your own website with this one request: that you link it to an animal welfare site -- a shelter, a charity, a campaign page; any website that helps animals.

DLTK's Holiday Crafts and Activities

Related: