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Artble: The Home of Passionate Art Lovers

Artble: The Home of Passionate Art Lovers
Mona Lisa Da Vinci David Michelangelo Entombment Pontormo A Young Girl Reading Fragonard Self-Portrait J-L David La Cometa Francisco Goya

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The Role of Decoherence in Quantum Mechanics First published Mon Nov 3, 2003; substantive revision Mon Apr 16, 2012 Interference phenomena are a well-known and crucial aspect of quantum mechanics, famously exemplified by the two-slit experiment. There are situations, however, in which interference effects are artificially or spontaneously suppressed. How to Turn a Sketch into a Fat Cat Vector Illustration This tutorial aims to guide you from sketchbook to screen; a "Fat Cat" doodled with biro translated into a neat vector caricature. Intermediate knowledge of Adobe Illustrator is advised. Let's take a look at how to create a cheeky cat illustration - from initial concept through to vector goodness. Final Image Preview Below is the final design we will be working towards. Want access to the full Vector Source files and downloadable copies of every tutorial, including this one?

Art History: Research & Reference Resources Christopher Witcombe's Handy List of UsefulRESEARCH & REFERENCE RESOURCES Christopher L. C. E. WitcombeProfessor, Department of Art History, Sweet Briar College Smarter Every Day Twitter SmarterEveryDay Loading... Working... Rock & Rule Plot[edit] This plot is for the original version of the film. Mok, an aging yet legendary rock musician, is on the search for a very special voice that can unleash a powerful demon from another dimension to fullfil his wish of being immortalized as an musician/Magic Man.

bigthink There are only two events in the universe that defy the laws of physics: black holes and the big bang, and while scientists try to explain them, crucial evidence may be eaten up in the meantime. Christophe Galfard's book is "The Universe in Your Hand A Journey Through Space, Time, and Beyond" ( Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here:YouTube: Transcript - The interesting thing about trying to unravel the laws of nature is that yes, we have found some laws.

The latest Art Here Lately #6 Dallas' Oldest Art Magazine, Promoting Dallas Artists Since 1979 Home Index Opportunities ThEdblog Resources Feedback Reviews Google this Site Art by Members How to Join Send Us Stuff Artists with Websites Visual Art Groups Contact Us The Art Here Lately Index and The Latest Art Here Lately page Every artwork on this site is copyright 2009 or before by the originating artist. No reproduction or approximation of these works may be created in any medium for any commercial or nonprofit use without specific written permission from the originating artist. Art Here Lately #6

60 Years of American Economic History, Told in 1 Graph - Jordan Weissmann In the 60 years after World War II, the United States built the world's greatest middle class economy, then unbuilt it. And if you want a single snapshot that captures the broad sweep of that transformation, you could do much worse than this graph from a new Pew report, which tracks how average family incomes have changed at each rung of the economic ladder from 1950 through 2010. Here's the arc it captures: In the immediate postwar period, America's rapid growth favored the middle and lower classes. The poorest fifth of all households, in fact, fared best.

8 Cheat Sheet Wallpapers for Designers and Developers Web designers and developers have a lot to remember, from keyboard shortcuts to function names. That’s why it’s handy to have cheat sheets near by for a quick reference. Most people like to print out there cheat sheets on paper and have them sitting on their desk, but another convenient place for a cheat sheet is right on your computers desktop in the form of a wallpaper. Here we’ve rounded up a few very useful cheat sheets for web designers and developers that can be used as desktop wallpapers. Photoshop Keyboard Shortcuts Life without the Fed: The Suffolk System - C.J. Maloney Suppose for a moment that Republican Congressman Ron Paul's fondest wish came true, and the Federal Reserve Bank was not only audited but closed down. As far-fetched as such a notion may seem, it would not be the first time in our nation's history that a central bank has been shuttered. For all the Fed's imposing grandeur, Ben Bernanke is running our third (albeit longest-running) try at a central bank. This country has lived without a central bank before and, if given the chance, could do so again. Most every American (led by Paul Krugman), though, would be horrified at the thought.

2011 August « the pyramid beach roadhouse the ultimate noir cast… by CHUCK STEPHENS Stanley Kubrick’s labyrinthine 1956 heist flick The Killing—an exploded rethink of John Huston’s The Asphalt Jungle and eventual template for the narrative convolutions of Reservoir Dog—became an instant facet in the jewel that was film noir, even as it refracted many of the cinematic crime bedazzlements that had preceded it. Much of its pleasure lies purely in its casting of an array of filmdom noir’s familiar faces, the movie’s every heavily shadowed curve and intentionally left-rough spot tricked out with class-act fillies and brick-headed galoots from Hollywood’s brightest galaxies of second- and third-rung heroes. Sterling Hayden (Johnny Clay) The Suffolk System - The Region A strong pattern among banks in four states doesn’t prove a theory, of course. But another banking system in the antebellum period, the Suffolk Banking System of New England, offers further support for the importance of exposure to loss and authority to restrain risky banking activity. The System provides an example in which a motivated party (the Suffolk Bank of Boston) could and did take action to curb risktaking by (and improve survival of) interconnected banks (those who joined Suffolk’s noteclearing system) whose potential losses would negatively affect its interests.* Suffolk was a regional note-clearing system—not a bank liability insurance scheme—run by the Suffolk Bank of Boston from 1825 to 1858.

Covalent radius The covalent radius, rcov, is a measure of the size of an atom that forms part of one covalent bond. It is measured either in picometres (pm) or ångströms (Å), with 1 Å = 100 pm. In principle, the sum of the two covalent radii should equal the covalent bond length between two atoms, R(AB) = r(A) + r(B). Moreover, different radii can be introduced for single, double and triple bonds (r1, r2 and r3 below), in a purely operational sense.

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