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Quentin Tarantino

Quentin Tarantino
Early life[edit] Tarantino was born in Knoxville, Tennessee in 1963.[6] He is the son of actor and amateur musician Tony Tarantino and nurse Connie McHugh.[7][8] He has a younger half-brother named Ron. Tarantino grew bored with the James Best Acting School and left after two years, although he kept in touch with all of his acting friends. Film career[edit] 1980s[edit] After Tarantino met Lawrence Bender at a Hollywood party, Bender encouraged him to write a screenplay. 1990s[edit] In January 1992, Tarantino's Reservoir Dogs was screened at the Sundance Film Festival. In Pulp Fiction (1994), Tarantino maintained the aestheticization of violence, for which he is known, as well as his non-linear storylines. 2000s[edit] Tarantino's film Inglourious Basterds, released in 2009, is the story of a group of Jewish-American guerilla soldiers in Nazi-occupied France during World War II. 2010–present[edit] Related:  M-ZGreat Storytellers

Alain Resnais In later films, Resnais moved away from the overtly political topics of some previous works and developed his interests in an interaction between cinema and other cultural forms, including theatre, music, and comic books. This led to imaginative adaptations of plays by Alan Ayckbourn, Henri Bernstein and Jean Anouilh, as well as films featuring various kinds of popular song. His films frequently explore the relationship between consciousness, memory, and the imagination, and he was noted for devising innovative formal structures for his narratives.[5][6] Throughout his career, he won many awards from international film festivals and academies. Early life[edit] Visits to the theatre in Paris gave Resnais the desire to be an actor, and in 1939 he moved to Paris to become an assistant in Georges Pitoëff's company at the Théâtre des Mathurins. Career[edit] 1946–58: short films[edit] 1959–68[edit] Resnais's first feature film was Hiroshima mon amour (1959). 1969–80[edit] 1981–2014[edit]

Oliver Stone William Oliver Stone (born September 15, 1946) is an American film director, screenwriter, producer and military veteran. Stone came to public prominence between the mid-1980s and the early 1990s for writing and directing a series of films about the Vietnam War, in which he had participated as an infantry soldier. Many of Stone's films focus on contemporary and controversial American political and cultural issues during the late 20th century. Early life[edit] Writing and directing career[edit] 1970s[edit] 1980s[edit] Platoon brought Stone's name to a much wider audience. 1990s[edit] I make my films like you're going to die if you miss the next minute. 1994 saw the release of Stone's satire of the modern media, Natural Born Killers. 2000s[edit] Oliver Stone with Rino Barillari in "Piazza dé Ricci" exit of the restaurant "Pierluigi" in Rome – September 25, 2012 2010s[edit] Documentaries[edit]

Dean Martin - Dean Martin (born Dino Paul Crocetti; June 7, 1917 – December 25, 1995) was an Italian American singer, actor, comedian, and film producer. One of the most popular and enduring American entertainers of the mid-20th century, Martin was nicknamed the "King of Cool" for his seemingly effortless charisma and self-assuredness.[1][2] He was a member of the "Rat Pack" and a star in concert stage/nightclubs, recordings, motion pictures, and television. He was the host of the television variety program The Dean Martin Show (1965–1974) and The Dean Martin Celebrity Roast (1974–1985). Early life[edit] Martin was born in Steubenville, Ohio, to an Italian father, Gaetano, and an Italian-American mother, Angela Crocetti (née Barra). In October 1941 Martin married Elizabeth ("Betty") Anne McDonald, they had four children, and the marriage ended in 1949. By 1946 Martin was doing well, but he was little more than an East Coast nightclub singer with a common style, similar to that of Bing Crosby.

Wim Wenders Alongside filmmaking, Wenders works with the medium of photography, emphasizing images of desolate landscapes.[1][2] Early life[edit] Wenders was born in Düsseldorf into a traditional Catholic family. His father, Heinrich Wenders, was a surgeon. Set on making his obsession also his life's work, Wenders returned to Germany in 1967 to work in the Düsseldorf office of United Artists. Career[edit] Wenders' book, Emotion Pictures, a collection of diary essays written while a film student, was adapted and broadcast as a series of plays on BBC Radio 3, featuring Peter Capaldi as Wenders, with Gina McKee, Saskia Reeves, Dennis Hopper, Harry Dean Stanton and Ricky Tomlinson, dramatised by Neil Cargill. Wenders was collaborating with artist/journalist and longtime friend Melinda Camber Porter on a documentary feature about his body of work, Wim Wenders - Visions on Film, when Porter passed away - the film remains incomplete. Wenders is a member of the advisory board of World Cinema Foundation.

Pulp Fiction (1994 Roman Polanski Roman Polanski (born Rajmund Roman Thierry Polański; 18 August 1933) is a Polish and, since 1976, naturalized-French[1] film director, producer, writer, and actor. Having made films in Poland, the United Kingdom, France and the United States, he is considered one of the few "truly international filmmakers."[2] Polanski's films have inspired diverse directors, including the Coen brothers,[3] Wes Anderson,[4] David Fincher,[5] Atom Egoyan,[6] Darren Aronofsky,[7] Park Chan-wook,[8] Sean Durkin,[9] Abel Ferrara,[10] and Wes Craven.[11] Early life World War II I had just been visiting my grandmother ... when I received a foretaste of things to come. As he roamed the countryside trying to survive in a Poland now occupied by German troops, he witnessed many horrors, such as being "forced to take part in a cruel and sadistic game in which German soldiers took shots at him for target practice After the war After the war he was reunited with his father, and moved back to Kraków. Film director 1960s

Takashi Miike Takashi Miike (三池 崇史, Miike Takashi?, born August 24, 1960) is a highly prolific and controversial Japanese filmmaker. He has directed over ninety theatrical, video, and television productions since his debut in 1991. Miike is credited with directing fifteen productions in the years 2001 and 2002 alone. Biography[edit] Early life[edit] Miike was born in Yao, Osaka, Japan, an area inhabited by the working class and immigrants. Career[edit] Miike's first films were television productions, but he also began directing several direct-to-video V-Cinema releases. Themes of his work[edit] Miike has garnered international notoriety for depicting shocking scenes of extreme violence and sexual perversions. Controversies[edit] However, the British Board of Film Classification refused to allow the release of the film uncut in Britain, citing its extreme levels of sexual violence towards women. Filmography[edit] Director[edit] Actor[edit] Producer[edit] Other work[edit] References[edit] Further reading[edit]

Peter Lawford Peter Sydney Ernest Lawford (born Peter Sydney Ernest Aylen;[1][2] September 7, 1923 – December 24, 1984) was an English-born American actor.[3] He was a member of the "Rat Pack" and brother-in-law to President John F. Kennedy, and more noted in later years for his off-screen activities as a celebrity than for his acting. From the 1940s to the 1960s, he had a strong presence in popular culture and starred in a number of highly acclaimed films. Early life[edit] Born in London in 1923, he was the only child of Lieutenant General Sir Sydney Turing Barlow Lawford, KBE (1865-1953) and May Sommerville Bunny (1883-1972). He spent his early childhood in France, and owing to his family's travels, was never formally educated. Career[edit] Films[edit] Prior to World War II, Lawford had gained a contract position with the MGM studios. MGM career[edit] With actors such as Clark Gable and James Stewart away at war, Lawford was recognized as the romantic lead on the MGM lot. Post-MGM[edit] Television[edit]

Jean-Luc Godard Jean-Luc Godard (French: [ʒɑ̃lyk ɡɔdaʁ]; born 3 December 1930) is a French-Swiss film director, screenwriter and film critic. He is often identified with the 1960s French film movement La Nouvelle Vague, or "New Wave". Like his New Wave contemporaries, Godard criticized mainstream French cinema's "Tradition of Quality", which "emphasized craft over innovation, privileged established directors over new directors, and preferred the great works of the past to experimentation." To challenge this tradition, he and like-minded critics started to make their own films. Many of Godard's films challenge the conventions of traditional Hollywood in addition to French cinema.[3] He is often considered the most radical French filmmaker of the 1960s and 1970s. Several of his films expressed his political views. Early life[edit] Early career (1950–59)[edit] Film criticism[edit] In Paris, in the Latin Quarter just prior to 1950, ciné-clubs (film societies) were gaining prominence. Filmmaking[edit]

Django Unchained (2012 Terrence Malick Early life[edit] Film career[edit] Malick started his film career after earning an MFA from the AFI Conservatory in 1969, directing the short film "Lanton Mills". At the AFI, he established contacts with people such as Jack Nicholson, longtime collaborator Jack Fisk, and agent Mike Medavoy, who procured for Malick freelance work revising scripts. He is credited with the screenplay for Pocket Money (1972), and he wrote an early draft of Dirty Harry (1971).[14] Paramount Pictures produced Malick's second film, Days of Heaven (1978), about a love triangle that develops in the farm country of the Texas Panhandle in the early 20th century. Chris Wisniewski about Days of Heaven and The New World[17] Following the release of Days of Heaven, Malick began developing a project for Paramount, titled Q, that explored the origins of life on earth. A. Malick's sixth feature, titled To the Wonder,[32] was shot predominately in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, and a few scenes were filmed in Pawhuska, Oklahoma.

Alex Proyas Early life[edit] Proyas was born to Greek parents in Egypt and moved to Sydney when he was 3.[1] At 17 he attended the Australian Film, Television, and Radio School, and began directing music videos shortly after.[1] He moved to Los Angeles in the United States to further his career, working on MTV music videos and TV commercials.[1] Career[edit] His next project was meant to be an action-oriented adaptation of John Milton's 17th-century Christian epic poem Paradise Lost, starring Bradley Cooper.[9] Both Proyas and Cooper were on hand to debut concept art at ComicCon 2011,[10] but the project was ultimately cancelled over budgetary concerns related to the effects.[11] Proyas also worked with John Foxx on the creation of Parallel Lives, a joint project. Awards[edit] At the 1994 Cannes Film Festival, Proyas was nominated for a Golden Palm award for his short film, Book of Dreams: 'Welcome to Crateland '​. Filmography[edit] Short films[edit] Feature films[edit] Music videos[edit] References[edit]

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