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Motion: Forces

Motion: Forces
Forces are a big part of physics. Physicists devote a lot of time to the study of forces that are found everywhere in the universe. The forces could be big, such as the pull of a star on a planet. The forces could also be very small, such as the pull of a nucleus on an electron. Let's look at the forces acting on that soccer ball before you kicked it. If there is more than one force acting on an object, the forces can be added up if they act in the same direction, or subtracted if they act in opposition. There is one totally important formula when it comes to forces, F = ma. Or search the sites for a specific topic. Related:  Forces and Motion

Force and Motion Facts Motion makes the world go 'round. Motion makes the moon go 'round too. In fact, motion makes lots of things go. What is Force? Force is just a fancy word for pushing or pulling. These two forces act at a distance and do not require direct contact between the objects to function. See D4K's site on Gravity. Magnetism produces a force that can either pull opposite ends of two magnets together or push the matching ends apart. Types Of Contact Forces There are 6 kinds of forces which act on objects when they come into contact with one another. Let's investigate how these forces can be seen in our lives. Normal Force A book resting on a table has the force of gravity pulling it toward the Earth. Experiment with this concept by trying one of these paper bridge experiments from ZOOM or Building Big! Applied Force Applied force refers to a force that is applied to an object such as when a person moves a piece of furniture across the room or pushes a button on the remote control. Frictional Force

Five-Minute Film Festival: Mobile Learning As technology evolves, it's important to make time for fresh beginnings and innovative ideas. For some, this could include a new perspective on the devices that are becoming so ubiquitous in our lives -- mobile gadgets like smartphones, tablets, mp3 players, and eReaders. Schools around the country are struggling with how to deal with these gadgets: is it better to embrace them and incorporate them into the learning process? Ban them and try to keep them out of schools? In the playlist below, I've gathered some videos about educators and schools who are welcoming the sea change that is mobile learning. Video Playlist: Mobile Devices in the Classroom Keep watching the player below to see the rest of the playlist, or view it on YouTube. More Resources for Mobile Learning

Planet Facts: Interesting Facts about the Eight Planets Order of the planets The order of planets from closest to farthest from the Sun are Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. The largest planet is Jupiter, followed by Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Earth, Venus, Mars and, the smallest planet, Mercury. If you include dwarf planets as well, the planets in order becomes Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Ceres, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Pluto, Haumea, Makemake and Eris being the furthest from the Sun. Distance of the planets from the Sun For the distances between each of the planets, see our distances between planets calculator. You can also calculate your weight on other planets. Types of planets The planets fall into two categories based on their physical characteristics: the terrestrial planets and the gas giants. Planet facts Click any of the eight planets below to find out more about the remarkable objects in our solar system. What is a planet? The answer to this question is a highly controversial one.

Galileo Drops the Ball - Virtual Experiment In around 1590 Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) climbed up the Leaning Tower of Pisa and dropped some balls to the ground. Two balls of different masses, but of similar shape and density that were released together hit the ground at the same time. Until then it was commonly believed that heavy things fall faster than light things. Many people still believe this, and casual observation of everyday phenomena often does tend to confirm this view. If you drop a brick and a feather at the same time the brick will probably hit the ground first. But this is because of differences in the amount of friction between these objects and the air around them, not because their masses are different. Galileo’s discovery is important in understanding how parachutes work. Click on the image to the left to try Galileo’s experiment for yourself. Find out more about Galileo Galilei.

Accessing Multimedia Using QR Codes Students of all ages are required to read text for a variety of purposes. With a large emphasis placed on teaching skills that help children tackle nonfiction, it's important to think about the different ways that students are gathering facts and details as they take in information. Teachers need to think beyond traditional text and make sure that their students have the necessary skills for processing, evaluating, and comprehending multimedia. Not a Trend, But a Tool Locating and sharing high quality multimedia content can be difficult. Many tech-enthusiastic educators have written off QR codes as a passing trend that can be replaced with augmented reality triggers. For teachers just getting started with technology, or those looking for flexibility in a BYOD (bring your own device) environment, QR codes still have an important place in a tech-friendly classroom. Curating and Sharing Any multimedia found on the Internet can be linked to a QR code.

Roller Coaster Game Welcome to the death defying Funderstanding Roller Coaster! This simulator is designed for people who want to design their own thrilling coaster and educators who want to use a cool activity to simulate the application of physics by using an exciting interactive tool and access to a wonderful reference source. It is your mission to become a roller coaster designer so that you can achieve maximum thrills and chills without crashing or flying off the track (unless that’s how you like your coaster to work!). If you accept this mission you must decide on a number of factors. This great educational online tool offers an interactive way for kids to play a roller coaster game, and learn while doing it. Finally, some fun online education kids! Due to some great feedback, we have decided to put back the original coaster AND also created a different version of this new coaster which keeps the coaster locked to the track. If you need help, click on the ‘? Contact us for more information.

The First 5s with iPads Author's Note: This post expands on ideas that I originally shared last year on Edutopia. With the start of school approaching and the looming expectation of incorporating iPads into the curriculum becoming a reality, the big question many educators are asking is: "Where should I begin?" Last year, I wrote about 5 Steps for the First 5 Days. However, what about the five days after that? It can seem daunting to envision a year's worth of activities with iPads, but when taken in small chunks, it doesn't need to be intimidating. The First 5 Hours One of the great benefits of iPads is the immediate access to a camera and microphone. Take a picture of each student to use as a visual attendance sheet, to create avatars, or as an icebreaker. The pictures or videos captured during these initial activities could even be posted to a Padlet Wall to create a digital bulletin board. The First 5 Days The power of the iPad is how it can be used as a creation device. The First 5 Weeks Getting Started

Edheads - Activate Your Mind! Smartphones: From Toy to Tool In classrooms, smartphones are slowly shifting out of the toy-and-liability-to-attention category, and into the tool-and-engaging-students category. It's part of the movement to "meet students where they are" that's being embraced by teachers who believe in a non-standardized approach to education. Jeremy Mettler, social studies teacher at Batavia (New York) High School, puts it this way: "Students all have them and they love using them, but they don't realize they're walking around with a computer in their pocket." Yet computers, helpful as they are, can be a distraction. I talked to a number of teachers around the country to see how they're addressing this challenge. A Powerful Participation Tool Mettler finds smartphones helpful to encourage participation in class. Example In a recent unit on cultural diffusion and physical geography, students spent the morning visiting the mountains (aluminum bleachers in the football field) and the desert (baseball diamonds). Enhanced Literary Units

Mobile Learning Support for New Teachers The mobile learning revolution is alive and growing in popularity every day. When schools move toward mobile learning in the classroom, they can take advantage of electronic devices such as tablets and cell phones that offer portability and ease of use. Mobile learning technologies can offer teachers a flexible approach to learning with their students in a variety of locations, and encourage this learning to continue at home. As schools begin to consider the movement towards mobile learning, it's important to support teachers with strategies for success, particularly if they are new. As I began to research this topic I was disappointed to discover that resources for supporting new teacher use of mobile learning strategies weren't easily accessible. So I reached out to my friend Lisa Nielsen and her co-author Willyn Webb to share with us how a new teacher might begin to use mobile learning in the classroom. Lisa Nielsen and Willyn Webb Success doesn't just happen. 1) Notify Parents

Amidst a Mobile Revolution in Schools, Will Old Teaching Tactics Work? Getty Just a few years ago, the idea of using a mobile phone as a legitimate learning tool in school seemed far-fetched, if not downright blasphemous. Kids were either prohibited from bringing their phones to school, or at the very least told to shut it off during school hours. But these days, it’s not unusual to hear a teacher say, “Class, turn on your cell. It’s time to work.” Harvard professor Chris Dede has been working in the field of education technology for decades, and is astonished at how quickly mobile devices are penetrating in schools. That’s not necessarily surprising, given that a staggering 80 percent of teens have cell phones. “People are talking about this being an inflection point,” said Elliot Soloway. “I’m petrified that we’ll apply new technology to old pedagogy.” The most recent data available is from 2010, and indicates that 62 percent of schools allow cell phones to be used on school grounds, though not in classrooms. This Actually some schools are seeing gains.

Is All This Student Data Changing the Way Teachers Teach? Christy Novack works with students in her Burlingame, Calif. classroom. Francesca Segre/MindShift With so much access to student data these days, teachers are experimenting with different tactics, and figuring out what’s working and what’s not. For example, for Amy Walker, who teaches Spanish in a small, rural, low-income school in Marionville, Missouri, says using data can be helpful, but she’s leery of relying too heavily on it. “There is a place for data, but it can be overrated,” she says. Likewise, another educator raises a similar concern. But educators who do embrace data-driven teaching report that using data adds one more tool to their existing teaching tool chest, allowing them to help students in more specific areas of need. Of the hundreds of educational apps and software programs on the market, most fall into three categories: analytical, motivational and instructional tools. Pinpointing Student Needs “It takes the narrative out of a teacher’s story about Johnny. Related

Why Mobile Learning Apps Are The Future of Education | ExamTime Mobile learning apps and students, they exist like the original odd couple. On one hand you have the app, trendy, cool, ever evolving and students just love them. On the other hand you have exams, study and lots of learning; things that students are not so fond of. When we talk about mobile learning apps or m-learning, we mean learning that is done through portable devices such as smartphones and tablets. Why mobile learning? Historically, access for teachers and students in some countries to ICT has been limited. There are currently almost 7 billion mobile phones in the world, almost as many inhabitants as on the planet. This opens up numerous possibilities for the advancement of education and learning. 85% of ‘generation Z’ in the United Kingdom (those aged 16 to 24) now own smartphones. This example is just the tip of the iceberg and focuses heavily on disadvantaged areas. Leverage all at your disposal But wait, there’s more Videos/Sound: This can be used to create videos or podcasts.

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