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Presidential Libraries and Museums of the National Archives

Presidential Libraries and Museums of the National Archives
Learn about Presidential Libraries and Museums Presidential Libraries and Museums promote understanding of the presidency and the American experience. We preserve and provide access to historical materials, support research, and create interactive programs and exhibits that educate and inspire. Visit the Presidential Libraries and Museums Presidential Libraries and Museums present vast archives of documents, museums full of important Presidential artifacts, interesting educational and public programs, and informative web sites. Research Presidential Documents Presidential Libraries and Museums are repositories for the papers, records and historical materials of the Presidents. We work to ensure that these irreplaceable items are preserved and made available for the widest possible use by researchers. White House Transition Project Former White House staff discuss the presidential administrations from Richard M. Visit the Libraries Online Related:  Election Economics

The Artful Presidency: Selections from the Archives of American Art - Exhibitions November 2000Online exhibition created to complement the exhibition "The American Presidency: A Glorious Burden," at the National Museum of American History. The Artful Presidency, an online exhibition, is presented by the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art to celebrate the connections between American artists and the American presidency from George Washington to the Carter administration. It complements the exhibition "The American Presidency: A Glorious Burden," at the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, which opened November 15, 2000. A photograph of Theodore Roosevelt dedicating the Navy Monument in San Francisco's Union Square. Learn More Additional information about this image Creator: Rembrandt Peale Additional information about this image Additional information about this image Creator: Ebenezer Hazard Additional information about this image Creator: Andrew Jackson Additional information about this image Creator: John James Abert Creator: Rubens Peale

New Deal Network America: History and Life, EBSCO Publishing This bibliographic resource provides a robust source of information focusing on the history and life of the United States and Canada. Selective indexing includes over a thousand journals dating back over 55 years. This source has proved to be an important bibliographic reference tool for students and scholars of U.S. and Canadian history. A Valuable Resource for Every History Student Citations and links to book and media reviews are an added benefit to the America: History and Life database. {quote} Published since 1964, this is the definitive bibliographic reference covering the history, culture, area studies, and current affairs literature of the United States and Canada, from prehistory to the present...

Public Papers of the Presidents The official publication of United States Presidents' public writings, addresses, and remarks is published by the Federal Register. Learn More Printed Editions Volumes of the Public Papers of the Presidents currently in print are available for purchase from the Superintendent of Documents. The complete collection can be found at any Federal Depository Library Online Editions These online editions are available through a partnership between the Office of Presidential Libraries and the Office of the Federal Register. About the Public Papers of the Presidents The Office of the Federal Register (OFR) began publishing the Public Papers of the Presidents series in 1957 as an official publication of United States Presidents' public writings, addresses, and remarks (1 CFR 10). The series provides an historical reference covering the administrations of Presidents Hoover, Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush, and Clinton.

99 Interesting Facts about the U.S. Presidents Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) is the only U.S. president who was also a licensed bartender. He was co-owner of Berry and Lincoln, a saloon in Springfield, Illinois.b The only president to be unanimously elected was George Washington (1732-1799). He also refused to accept his presidential salary, which was $25,000 a year.b Because the KKK was a powerful political force, Truman was encouraged to join the organization. According to some accounts, he was inducted, though he was “never active.” Other accounts claim that though he gave the KKK a $10 membership fee, he demanded it back and was never inducted or initiated.f, i Grover Cleveland was the only president in history to hold the job of a hangman. Both had seven letters in their last names. An anarchist and lawyer named Charles Guiteau shot James Garfield in the back with a five-barrel, .44-caliber pistol called a British Bulldog in 1881. -- Posted November 30, 2009. References a Boller, Paul F. c Garrison, Webb. 2000.

National Recording Registry Phonautograms. Edouard-Leon Scott de Martinville. (c. 1853-1861) In late 1853 or early 1854, Edouard-Leon Scott de Martinville captured the first recorded sounds by etching onto blackened glass plates the movements of a boar’s-bristle stylus, vibrating in sympathy with a guitar and a human voice. Later, Scott made recordings on paper wrapped around a drum. The resulting "phonautograms" proved crucial to the development of recorded sound. Edison Talking Doll cylinder. (1888) Few, if any, sound recordings can lay claim to as many “firsts” as the small, mangled artifact of a failed business venture discovered in 1967 in the desk of an assistant to Thomas Edison. Edison exhibition recordings (group of three cylinders): "Around the World on the Phonograph"; "The Pattison Waltz"; and "Fifth Regiment March." (1888-1889) Jesse Walter Fewkes field recordings of the Passamaquoddy Indians. (1890) "The Lord's Prayer" and "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star." "Stars and Stripes Forever." " Gypsy Love Song."

Presidential Fun Facts BARACK OBAMA is our 44th president, but there actually have only been 43 presidents: Cleveland was elected for two nonconsecutive terms and is counted twice, as our 22nd and 24th president. EIGHT PRESIDENTS were born British subjects: Washington, J. Adams, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, J. Q. Adams, Jackson, and W. Harrison. EIGHT PRESIDENTS never attended college: Washington, Jackson, Van Buren, Taylor, Fillmore, Lincoln, A. PRESIDENTS WHO would be considered "Washington outsiders" (i.e., the 18 presidents who never served in Congress) are: Washington, J. THE MOST COMMON religious affiliation among presidents has been Episcopalian, followed by Presbyterian. THE ANCESTRY of all 44 presidents is limited to the following heritages, or some combination thereof: Dutch, English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh, Swiss, German , and Africian. THE OLDEST president inaugurated was Reagan (age 69); the youngest was Kennedy (age 43). THE TALLEST president was Lincoln at 6'4"; at 5'4", Madison was the shortest.

How to Become President of the U.S. Poster | Grades K - 5 Download or order a poster. (Please get your parent's permission) Lesson PlanVideos: The Requirements, Primaries and Caucuses, Conventions to Election, How Votes Are Counted, How to Become President U.S. Constitution's Requirements for a Presidential Candidate At least 35 years oldA natural born citizen of the United StatesA resident of the United States for 14 years Step 1: Primaries and Caucuses There are many people who want to be president and each of these people have their own ideas about how our government should work. Caucus: In a caucus, party members select the best candidate through a series of discussions and votes.Primary: In a primary, party members vote for the best candidate that will represent them in the general election. Step 2: National Conventions Each party holds a national convention to finalize the selection of one presidential nominee. Step 3: General Election People in every state across the country vote for one president and one vice president.

Arkansas Secretary of State: Young Voters Program Empowering young citizens— that's the mission of the Secretary of State's Young Voters Workshop. Hundreds of students from all around the state participate in the day-long programs held each March and September. This is one of our most popular student programs, and educating voters and future voters is one of our most important activities. The workshop demonstrates the importance of voting to high school students who are nearing or have already reached voting age. From the founding of America to the civil rights and women’s suffrage movements, students experience the value of their right to vote through discussion, role playing and games. Students especially enjoy the chance to speak their minds during a guided current events discussion. “I want these young people to get involved. -- Secretary of State Mark Martin

Election Lessons Below you will find some EconEdLink lesson plans and interactives that are related to the upcoming elections. These lessons and interactives will help your students to see and understand the economics of elections. These are printable lessons from the Council For Economic Education that you can use with your students. These OnLine lessons provide resources for you and your students to explore the concept of budget. These OnLine lessons provide resources for you and your students to explore the concept of the deficit. These OnLine lessons provide resources for you and your students to explore the concept of the national global-interests. These OnLine lessons provide resources for you and your students to explore the concept of the national healthcare. These OnLine lessons provide resources for you and your students to explore the concept of the national taxes. These OnLine lessons provide resources for you and your students to explore the econmics of voting.

Who Will Students “Elect” in 2016? The National Student/Parent Mock Election gives American students, and parents too if they wish, all across the country and around the world, the opportunity to cast their votes for candidates in both the federal and state elections. They may also vote on the issues they care about. This program builds on the 36-year history of the National Student/Parent Mock Election, the leading program in student voting. “The National Student/Parent Mock Election is proud to announce a new partnership for 2016,” said Gloria Kirshner, president. Teachers (including home school instructors) are encouraged to use the free materials and curriculum ( developed for the program to create thoughtful lessons leading up to and around the upcoming election of the president, U.S. senators and state governors where there is a race, and U.S. representatives. Teachers Guides, updated for 2016, are slated to be posted by September.

Use children's books to teach about elections Use children's books to teach about elections: Ten books get our vote! The presidential elections are just around the corner, so teachers may want to check out this list of ten books to help students learn about elections and the election process. Included: Books for students of all ages! This year's presidential elections offer teachers a unique opportunity to teach youngsters about character, leadership, and the meaning of participatory government. Teachers might use the ten books listed below to help to illuminate those issues. Any of the books would make excellent additions to a school or classroom library; most would be great as "read alouds" or to prompt discussion about the upcoming elections. Each book is listed and then briefly described. Class President, by Johanna HurwitzAges 8-12 Julio works to get his good friend Lucas elected class president.

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