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Thinking tools

Thinking tools
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Motivation Motivation has been shown to have roots in physiological, behavioral, cognitive, and social areas. Motivation may be rooted in a basic impulse to optimize well-being, minimize physical pain and maximize pleasure. It can also originate from specific physical needs such as eating, sleeping or resting, and sex. Motivation is an inner drive to behave or act in a certain manner. These inner conditions such as wishes, desires and goals, activate to move in a particular direction in behavior. Types of theories and models[edit] Motivational theories[edit] A class of theories about why people do things seeks to reduce the number of factors down to one and explain all behaviour through that one factor. Conscious and unconscious motivations[edit] A number of motivational theories emphasize the distinction between conscious and unconscious motivations. Psychological theories and models[edit] Motivation can be looked at as a cycle where thoughts influence behaviors and behaviors thus drive performance.

Mind Mapping Software - Create Mind Maps online Bloom’s Taxonomy: The 21st Century Version So much have been written about Bloom’s taxonomy; one click in a search engine will flood your page with hundreds of articles all of which revolve around this taxonomy. Only few are those who have tried to customize it to fit in the 21st century educational paradigm. As a fan of Bloom’s pedagogy and being a classroom practitioner, I always look for new ways to improve my learning and teaching, and honestly speaking , if you are a teacher/ educator and still do not understand Bloom’s taxonomy then you are missing out on a great educational resource. The following article is a summary and a fruit of my long painstaking research in the field of Bloom’s taxonomy. The purpose is to help teachers grow professionally and provide them with a solid informational background on how to better understand and apply Bloom’s taxonomy in classrooms in the light of the new technological advances and innovations. 1 – The cognitive : The intellectual or knowledge based domain consisted of 6 levels .

Autodidacticism Autodidacticism (also autodidactism) or self-education (also self-learning and self-teaching) is education without the guidance of masters (such as teachers and professors) or institutions (such as schools). Generally, an autodidact is an individual who chooses the subject they will study, their studying material, and the studying rhythm and time. An autodidact may or may not have formal education, and their study may be either a complement or an alternative to it. Many notable contributions have been made by autodidacts. Etymology[edit] The term has its roots in the Ancient Greek words αὐτός (autós, lit. Terminology[edit] Various terms are used to describe self-education. Modern education[edit] Autodidacticism is sometimes a complement of modern education.[2] As a complement to education, students would be encouraged to do more independent work.[3] The Industrial Revolution created a new situation for self-directed learners. In history, philosophy, literature, and television[edit] Dr.

Professional Development Te Kete Ipurangi Navigation: Te Kete Ipurangi Communities Schools Te Kete Ipurangi user options: Close Register TKI uses the New Zealand Education Sector Logon system for user accounts. If you already have an Education Sector user ID and password, you are ready to log in. Home Professional Development This section of the site provides information to support teachers' professional understanding of mathematics teaching and also information to develop their content knowledge of mathematics. Search Search by popular keywords Copyright © 2010 New Zealand Ministry of Education

Knowledge building The Knowledge Building (KB) theory was created and developed by Carl Bereiter and Marlene Scardamalia for describing what a community of learners needs to accomplish in order to create knowledge. The theory addresses the need to educate people for the knowledge age society, in which knowledge and innovation are pervasive.[1] Overview[edit] Scardamalia & Bereiter distinguish between Knowledge building and learning. Knowledge building refers to the process of creating new cognitive artifacts as a result of common goals, group discussions, and synthesis of ideas. One of the hallmarks of Knowledge building is a sense of we superseding the sense of I, a feeling that the group is operating collectively, and not just as an assemblage of individuals. Knowledge building may be defined simply as "the creation, testing, and improvement of conceptual artifacts. Principles of Knowledge building[edit] Scardamalia (2002)[7] identifies twelve principles of Knowledge building as follows: See also[edit]

Mind42 - Free, Fast and Simple online mind mapping Bloom's Taxonomy Bloom's wheel, according to the Bloom's verbs and matching assessment types. The verbs are intended to be feasible and measurable. Bloom's taxonomy is a classification of learning objectives within education. It is named for Benjamin Bloom, who chaired the committee of educators that devised the taxonomy, and who also edited the first volume of the standard text, Taxonomy of Educational Objectives: The Classification of Educational Goals. Bloom's taxonomy refers to a classification of the different objectives that educators set for students (learning objectives). Bloom's taxonomy is considered to be a foundational and essential element within the education community. History[edit] Although named after Bloom, the publication of Taxonomy of Educational Objectives followed a series of conferences from 1949 to 1953, which were designed to improve communication between educators on the design of curricula and examinations. Cognitive[edit] Knowledge[edit] Comprehension[edit] Application[edit]

College - The Center for Innovation and Learning The Center for Innovation and Learning aims to design, develop and integrate resources that enrich learning and teaching at Wofford, and to provide a locus for conversations, both within the Wofford community and with other institutions, about excellence and innovation in a residential liberal arts education. Purposeful integration of research, curricular innovation, and support in The Center for Innovation and Learning is a step toward the academic synthesis a 21st century liberal arts college can offer both its own community members and society at large. Our mission is four-fold: to support innovation in teaching, provide an environment for the support of teaching and learning, to support on-campus writing initiatives in curricular and co-curricular programming, and to assess for the effectiveness of innovations undertaken in the service of student learning.

Marking resources for e-asTTle writing / Teacher resources / Home - e-asTTle Teachers can find many resources to assist them with marking e-asTTle writing. Please click on the links below. Marking rubric The revised writing tool assesses writing across five purposes. These are: describe, explain, recount, narrate, and persuade. The Describe purpose is divided into two: describe a moment in time, and describe a process. A new generic marking rubric is used to assess writing across any of the five purposes. Download the generic rubric here. Writing prompts There are 20 prompts that cover the five writing purposes. Structure and Language notes Each prompt provides additional Structure and Language notes which define the demands of a particular writing purpose, available from within the tool after creating a test. Specific exemplars Each of the 20 writing prompts has its own annotated exemplars specific to that prompt. Generic exemplars The set of generic exemplars illustrates the use of the e-asTTle marking rubric to score writing across the writing prompts. Return to top

Hacking Knowledge: 77 Ways to Learn Faster, Deeper, and Better If someone granted you one wish, what do you imagine you would want out of life that you haven’t gotten yet? For many people, it would be self-improvement and knowledge. Newcounter knowledge is the backbone of society’s progress. Great thinkers such as Leonardo da Vinci, Thomas Edison, Benjamin Franklin, Albert Einstein, and others’ quests for knowledge have led society to many of the marvels we enjoy today. Your quest for knowledge doesn’t have to be as Earth-changing as Einstein’s, but it can be an important part of your life, leading to a new job, better pay, a new hobby, or simply knowledge for knowledge’s sake — whatever is important to you as an end goal. Life-changing knowledge does typically require advanced learning techniques. Health Shake a leg. Balance Sleep on it. Perspective and Focus Change your focus, part 2. Recall Techniques Listen to music. Visual Aids Every picture tells a story. Verbal and Auditory Techniques Stimulate ideas. Kinesthetic Techniques Write, don’t type.

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