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Using CORS

Using CORS
Introduction APIs are the threads that let you stitch together a rich web experience. But this experience has a hard time translating to the browser, where the options for cross-domain requests are limited to techniques like JSON-P (which has limited use due to security concerns) or setting up a custom proxy (which can be a pain to set up and maintain). Cross-Origin Resource Sharing (CORS) is a W3C spec that allows cross-domain communication from the browser. By building on top of the XMLHttpRequest object, CORS allows developers to work with the same idioms as same-domain requests. The use-case for CORS is simple. As you can see from this example, CORS support requires coordination between both the server and client. Making a CORS Request This section shows how to make a cross-domain request in JavaScript. Creating the XMLHttpRequest object CORS is supported in the following browsers: Chrome, Firefox, Opera and Safari all use the XMLHttpRequest2 object. Event handlers withCredentials Resources

Moment.js | Home Underscore.js How to return the response from an Ajax call? Essential jQuery Plugin Patterns Advertisement I occasionally write about implementing design patterns1 in JavaScript. They’re an excellent way of building upon proven approaches to solving common development problems, and I think there’s a lot of benefit to using them. But while well-known JavaScript patterns are useful, another side of development could benefit from its own set of design patterns: jQuery plugins. The official jQuery plugin authoring guide2 offers a great starting point for getting into writing plugins and widgets, but let’s take it further. Plugin development has evolved over the past few years. Some developers may wish to use the jQuery UI widget factory3; it’s great for complex, flexible UI components. I began to think about plugin patterns after noticing a number of efforts to create a one-size-fits-all jQuery plugin boilerplate. Let’s assume that you’ve tried your hand at writing your own jQuery plugins at some point and you’re comfortable putting together something that works. Patterns And so on.

.append Description: Insert content, specified by the parameter, to the end of each element in the set of matched elements. The .append() method inserts the specified content as the last child of each element in the jQuery collection (To insert it as the first child, use .prepend()). The .append() and .appendTo() methods perform the same task. The major difference is in the syntax-specifically, in the placement of the content and target. With .append(), the selector expression preceding the method is the container into which the content is inserted. Consider the following HTML: You can create content and insert it into several elements at once: Each inner <div> element gets this new content: You can also select an element on the page and insert it into another: If an element selected this way is inserted into a single location elsewhere in the DOM, it will be moved into the target (not cloned): Additional Arguments

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