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Dystopian Fiction

Dystopian Fiction
The utopia and its offshoot, the dystopia, are genres of literature that explore social and political structures. Utopian fiction is the creation of an ideal society, or utopia, as the setting for a novel. Dystopian fiction (sometimes referred to as apocalyptic literature) is the opposite: creation of an utterly horrible or degraded society that is generally headed to an irreversible oblivion, or dystopia.[1] Many novels combine both, often as a metaphor for the different directions humanity can take in its choices, ending up with one of two possible futures. More than 400 utopian works were published prior to the year 1900 in the English language alone, with more than a thousand others during the twentieth century.[2] Subgenres[edit] Utopian fiction[edit] Dystopian fiction[edit] Combinations[edit] Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels is sometimes linked with utopian (and dystopian) literature, because it shares the general preoccupation with ideas of the good (and bad) society. Notes[edit]

Action Fiction Action is one of the fiction-writing modes authors use to present fiction. Action includes movement, not meaning like standing up, but big movements. The term is also used to describe an exciting event or circumstance. The action genre is a class of creative works characterized by more emphasis on exciting action sequences than on character development or story-telling. The genre encompasses action fiction, action films, action games and analogous media in other formats such as manga and anime. There are many sub-genres, including martial arts action, extreme sports action, car chases and vehicles, suspense action, and action comedy, with each focusing in more detail on its own type and flavour of action. Marshall, Evan (1998).

Origins of Utopia Dying Earth (subgenre) The Dying Earth subgenre is a sub-category of science fiction, fantasy or science fantasy which takes place in the far future at either the end of life on Earth or the End of Time, when the laws of the universe themselves fail. Themes of world-weariness, innocence (wounded or otherwise), idealism, entropy, (permanent) exhaustion/depletion of many or all resources (such as soil nutrients), and the hope of renewal tend to pre-dominate. Another early example is La Fin du Monde (The End of the World, aka Omega: the last days of the world), written by Camille Flammarion and published in France in 1893. The first half of the novel is dealing with a comet on a collision course with earth in the 25th century. The last half focuses on earth's future history, where civilizations rise and fall, humans evolve and finally, its end as an old, dying and barren planet. Another early and more famous science fiction work to utilize the familiar Dying Earth imagery was H.

Horror Fiction Horror fiction, horror literature and also horror fantasy is a genre of literature, which is intended to, or has the capacity to frighten its readers, scare or startle viewers/readers by inducing feelings of horror and terror. It creates an eerie and frightening atmosphere. Horror can be either supernatural or non-supernatural. Often the central menace of a work of Horror fiction can be interpreted as a metaphor for the larger fears of a society. History[edit] Horror fiction has its roots in folklore and religious traditions, focusing on death, the afterlife, evil, the demonic and the principle of the thing embodied in the person.[1] These were manifested in stories of witches, vampires, werewolves, mummies, and ghosts. Gothic horror in the 18th century[edit] Edgar Allan Poe Horror in the 19th century[edit] The Gothic tradition blossomed into the genre modern readers call horror literature in the 19th century. Horror in the 20th century[edit] Contemporary horror fiction[edit]

Plato's Republic (wiki) Three interpretations of the Republic are presented; they are not exhaustive in their treatments of the work, but are examples of contemporary interpretation. In his A History of Western Philosophy (1945), Bertrand Russell identifies three parts to the Republic:[7] Books I–V: the eutopia portraying the ideal community and the education of the Guardians, parting from attempting to define justice;Books VI–VII: define “philosopher”, since philosophers are the ideal rulers of such a community;Books VIII–X: discuss the pros and cons of various practical forms of government. Francis Cornford, Kurt Hildebrandt (de), and Eric Voegelin contributed to an establishment of sub-divisions marked with special formulae in Greek: Prologue I.1. 327a—328b. I.2—I.5. 328b—331d. I.6—1.9. 331e—336a. I.10—1.24. 336b—354c. Introduction II.1—II.10. 357a—369b. Part I: Genesis and Order of the Polis II.11—II.16. 369b—376e. II.16—III.18. 376e—412b. III.19—IV.5. 412b—427c. IV.6—IV.19. 427c—445e. V.1—V.16. 449a—471c. P.

Genre: Speculative Fiction | Suite101.com Speculative fiction is often used as an umbrella term for science fiction, fantasy and horror genres. Writers in this genre though, will tell you that while they are grouped together, each has its own unique elements and style. Science Fiction Science fiction utilizes settings that tend to be outside of our ‘reality’ and that explores and encourages discussion of new, often controversial ideas. Settings and plots of science fiction novels ask the reader to suspend disbelief for a while, explaining fictional elements of the story using scientific fact or theories. A science fiction plot would typically include elements like future settings, alternative timelines or historical settings that depart from known historical facts. Most stories in this genre focus on plot and action rather than characterization. Science fiction frequently crosses over into other genres, so it’s difficult to define it with one generic definition. Horror Fantasy

Steampunk "Maison tournante aérienne" (aerial rotating house) by Albert Robida for his book Le Vingtième Siècle, a 19th-century conception of life in the 20th century Steampunk also refers to any of the artistic styles, clothing fashions, or subcultures, that have developed from the aesthetics of steampunk fiction, Victorian-era fiction, art nouveau design, and films from the mid-20th century.[3] Various modern utilitarian objects have been modded by individual artisans into a pseudo-Victorian mechanical "steampunk" style, and a number of visual and musical artists have been described as steampunk. History[edit] Precursors[edit] Origin of the term[edit] Dear Locus,Enclosed is a copy of my 1979 novel Morlock Night; I'd appreciate your being so good as to route it Faren Miller, as it's a prime piece of evidence in the great debate as to who in "the Powers/Blaylock/Jeter fantasy triumvirate" was writing in the "gonzo-historical manner" first. Modern steampunk[edit] steampunk cafe in Cape Town

More's Utopia (wiki) Utopia (in full: De optimo reip. statv, deque noua insula Vtopia, libellus uere aureus, nec minus salutaris quam festiuus ) is a work of fiction and political philosophy by Thomas More published in 1516. English translations of the title include A Truly Golden Little Book, No Less Beneficial Than Entertaining, of the Best State of a Republic, and of the New Island Utopia (literal) and A Fruitful and Pleasant Work of the Best State of a Public Weal , and of the New Isle Called Utopia (traditional). [ 1 ] (See " title " below.) The book, written in Latin , is a frame narrative primarily depicting a fictional island society and its religious , social and political customs. [ edit ] Title The title De optimo rei publicae statu deque nova insula Utopia literally translates, "Of a republic's best state and of the new island Utopia". One interpretation holds that this suggests that while Utopia might be some sort of perfected society, it is ultimately unreachable (see below). [ edit ] Plot

Neal Shusterman: Bruiser Awards & Honors Book Description TENNYSON: Don’t get me started on The Bruiser. He was voted “Most Likely to Get the Death Penalty” by the entire school. He’s the kid no one knows, no one talks to, and everyone hears disturbing rumors about. BRONTË: My brother has no right to talk about Brewster that way – no right to threaten him. BREWSTER: Stealer of screams and thief of anguish, I am a criminal, but you can’t see it, blinded by your own relief as my body becomes a battlefield in a war that can’t be won. Award-winning author Neal Shusterman has crafted a chilling and unforgettable novel about the power of unconditional friendship, the complex gear work of a family, and the sacrifices we endure for the people we love. Review From A.L.A. “Is it possible to experience joy if you don’t experience pain?

Butler's Erewhon (wiki) The first few chapters of the novel dealing with the discovery of Erewhon are in fact based on Butler's own experiences in New Zealand where, as a young man, he worked as a sheep farmer on Mesopotamia Station for about four years (1860–1864), and explored parts of the interior of the South Island and which he wrote about in his A First Year in Canterbury Settlement (1863). In the preface to the first edition of his book, Butler specified: The author wishes it to be understood that Erewhon is pronounced as a word of three syllables, all short — thus, E-re-whon. Nevertheless, the word is occasionally pronounced with two syllables as 'air – one'. Content[edit] The greater part of the book consists of a description of Erewhon. Erewhon satirises various aspects of Victorian society, including criminal punishment, religion and anthropocentrism. The Book of the Machines[edit] I regret that reviewers have in some cases been inclined to treat the chapters on Machines as an attempt to reduce Mr.

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