background preloader

Alleng

Alleng

Synonyms for words commonly used in student's writing Amazing- incredible, unbelievable, improbable, fabulous, wonderful, fantastic, astonishing, astounding, extraordinary Anger- enrage, infuriate, arouse, nettle, exasperate, inflame, madden Angry- mad, furious, enraged, excited, wrathful, indignant, exasperated, aroused, inflamed Answer- reply, respond, retort, acknowledge Ask- question, inquire of, seek information from, put a question to, demand, request, expect, inquire, query, interrogate, examine, quiz Awful- dreadful, terrible, abominable, bad, poor, unpleasant Beautiful - pretty, lovely, handsome, attractive, gorgeous, dazzling, splendid, magnificent, comely, fair, ravishing, graceful, elegant, fine, exquisite, aesthetic, pleasing, shapely, delicate, stunning, glorious, heavenly, resplendent, radiant, glowing, blooming, sparkling Begin - start, open, launch, initiate, commence, inaugurate, originate Brave - courageous, fearless, dauntless, intrepid, plucky, daring, heroic, valorous, audacious, bold, gallant, valiant, doughty, mettlesome

45 ways to avoid using the word 'very' Writers Write is your one-stop resource for writers. Use these 45 ways to avoid using the word ‘very’ to improve your writing. Good writers avoid peppering their writing with qualifiers like ‘very’ and ‘really’. They are known as padding or filler words and generally add little to your writing. According to Collins Dictionary: ‘Padding is unnecessary words or information used to make a piece of writing or a speech longer. Adding modifiers, qualifiers, and unnecessary adverbs and adjectives, weakens your writing. This post gives you 45 ways to avoid using the padding word ‘very’. Three Telling Quotes About ‘Very’ “Substitute ‘damn’ every time you’re inclined to write ‘very;’ your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be. If you enjoyed this, you will love: Top Tip: If you want to learn how to write a book, sign up for our online course. by Amanda Patterson © Amanda Patterson

50 Most Challenging Words Back in 2010 The New York Times published a list of 50 fancy words that most frequently stump their readership. The New York Times 50 Fancy Words (defined and used) 1. I am glad your inchoate proposals for integrating the company were not accepted this time, thus saving us face. 2. Anderson’s profligacy cost him his job and its better you tighten up your belt before you go the same way. 3. Mr. 4. Every major war on this planet were followed by many years of austerity. 5. The firm’s profligate spending only hastened its downfall. 6. Humpty Dumpty’s antics remain a constant source of baldenfreude for children and adults alike. 7. His ludicrous attempts at mimicry in the office only earned him the opprobrium of his colleagues. 8. The millionaire technocrat and his cronies were publicly derided for being apostates, after they were exposed of polluting the environment while purporting to have spent large sums for water conservation. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

20 more awesomely untranslatable words from around the world If only you could use these words in Scrabble. Photo: Jeremy Mates When linguists refer to “untranslatable” words, the idea is not that a word cannot somehow be explained in another language, but that part of the essence of the word is lost as it crosses from one language to another. This often is due to different social and cultural contexts that have shaped how the word is used. In the novel Shame, Salman Rushdie’s narrator suggests: “To unlock a society, look at its untranslatable words.” Here are 20 words that don’t translate directly into English; what may these words tell us about the societies in which they come from? 1. Arabic – [in-shal-la] While it can be translated literally as “if Allah wills,” the meaning of this phrase differs depending on the speaker’s tone of voice. It can be a genuine sentiment, such as when talking to an old friend and parting with “We’ll meet again, inshallah,” or it can be used as a way to tacitly imply you actually aren’t planning to do something. 2.

CALLIHOO Writing Helps--Feelings Table Character Feelings You can describe your character's feelings in more exact terms than just "happy" or "sad." Check these lists for the exact nuance to describe your character's intensity of feelings. SF Characters | SF Items | SF Descriptors | SF Places | SF EventsSF Jobs/Occupations | Random Emotions | Emotions List | Intensity of Feelings Commonly Confused Words Commonly Confused Words (printable version here) Words that sound alike or nearly alike but have different meanings often cause writers trouble. Here are a few of the most common pairs with correct definitions and examples: ACCEPT-to receive ex: He accepts defeat well. AFFECT-to influence ex: Lack of sleep affects the quality of your work. A LOT (two words)-many. ALLUSION-an indirect reference ex:The professor made an allusion to Virginia Woolf's work. ALL READY-prepared ex: Dinner was all ready when the guests arrived. ALTOGETHER-entirely ex: Altogether, I thought that the student's presentation was well planned. APART-to be separated ex: The chain-link fence kept the angry dogs apart. ASCENT- climb ex: The plane's ascent made my ears pop. BREATH-noun, air inhaled or exhaled ex: You could see his breath in the cold air. CAPITAL-seat of government. CITE-to quote or document ex: I cited ten quotes from the same author in my paper. LEAD-noun, a type of metal ex: Is that pipe made of lead?

Basic English Grammar Course - Free Online Test Still not sure whether or not The Basic Cozy Grammar Course is the right course for you? Please feel free to take this test. If you can correctly answer all, or most, of the questions on this test, you likely don't need this basic course and should look toward a more advanced grammar course. I Underline the nouns in the following sentences. 1.Mary told the gardener about the flowers. 2.Night sank upon the dusky beach and on the purple sea. 3.Above the altar in the chapel John saw a beautiful picture. II Underline the pronouns in the following sentences. 1.I saw him with her. 2.Mary says she found it. 3.Have you seen them today? III Underline the verbs in the following sentences. 1.He sleeps soundly. 2.We fought a good fight. 3.He talked for two hours. 4.He became an official soon after. 5.The swallows twitter underneath the eaves. 6.He walked, ran, and jumped to the park. VI Underline the conjunctions in the following sentences. Answers

English for Kids, Games, Videos, Worksheets, Songs, Apps, For ESL Kids Lessons English Games and Activities for 3 year olds - ESL Games and Activities - eslHQ i also teach this age group for 30 minutes once a week (I have 15 different classes) I have found that generally there attention span is about 5-7 minutes. And I have found that using repitition in my activities is great also so I do the same activity every other week as the first time I do it they are just figuring it out and understanding directions and the second time they typically understand the activity better and put the vocab into their memory instead of trying to figure out my directions!! Things I have found to work: 1. "Feed the Monster": I took an old folgers coffee container and turned it into a monster. Then I hand out my flashcards and say, "oh the monster is hungry, who can feed it?" 2. 3. I do a bit more but these are the kids favorites. Sometimes I do felt things too...we just are doing facial parts so I made faces out of felt and the kids get to put them together. Good Luck.

Related: