background preloader

How Good is Your Time Management? - Time Management Training from MindTools

How Good is Your Time Management? - Time Management Training from MindTools
Discover Time Management Tools That Can Help You © iStockphoto How often do you find yourself running out of time? When you know how to manage your time you gain control of what you achieve. Take this self-test quiz to identify the aspects of time management that you need most help with. How Good is Your Time Management? Instructions For each statement, click the button in the column that best describes you. Your last quiz results are shown. You last completed this quiz on , at . Questions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 still need to be answered! As you answered the questions, you probably had some insight into areas where your time management could use a pick-me-up. (Questions 6, 10) Your score is 0 out of 0 To start managing time effectively, you need to set goals. People tend to neglect goal setting because it requires time and effort. (Questions 1, 4, 8, 13, 14, 15) Prioritizing what needs to be done is especially important. Most people have a "to-do" list of some sort. Related:  Time Management

Clearly Distraction-free reading Create the perfect online reading experience by clearing away everything but the content. Make it your own Choose from several pre-set themes or build one to suit your needs. Save it for later If you don’t have time to finish reading, tap on the Evernote icon to finish reading later. Time management What do you need to do? The first step towards taking control of your time is to brainstorm all your incomplete projects. Don't start doing things at this stage; just make sure you capture everything. Mind sweep checklist (PDF)Use this as a prompt to capture everything you need to get done. Writing "to-do" lists A "to-do" list is an effective way of increasing your daily productivity. List your tasks: write down all the things you intend to do that day. The official calendar of the University of Leeds includes term dates, exam periods and holidays for the next two years. Creating a planner PocketModDesign, download and print a personal planner. Prioritising: urgency/importance Recognising the difference between urgency and importance can help you spend your time more effectively. The urgent/important matrixThis article gives further information and advice on using this technique to prioritise your tasks. Scheduling your time for specific tasks Managing email Only check email at certain times.

fruux | Contacts. Calendars. Tasks - Always in sync. 100 time, energy, and attention hacks to become more productive When I graduated University with a business degree last May, I received two incredible full-time job offers, both of which I declined because I had a plan. For exactly one year, from May 1, 2013, through May 1, 2014, I would devour everything I could get my hands on about productivity, and write every day about the lessons I learned on A Year of Productivity. Over the last 12 months I have conducted countless productivity experiments on myself, interviewed some of the most productive people in the world, and read a ton of books and academic literature on productivity, all to explore how I could become as productive as possible, and then write about the lessons I learned. One year, 197 articles, and over one million hits later, I’ve reached the end of my year-long journey, but not before going out with a bang. This article’s a long one, but it’s pretty skimmable! Without further ado, let’s jump in. To kick things off, here are a number of my favorite time hacks to both: Hacks to get more time

How to Go From Working 60 Hours a Week to 40 By Sending 2 Emails a Week | Fire Me I Beg You | Summer of Quitting | Leave Your Day Job I’m convinced 95% of cubicle workers who work over 60 hours a week constantly can cut it down to 40-45 hours by sending 2 emails a week to their boss: Email #1: What you plan on getting done this week Email #2: What you actually got done this week That’s it. These 2 emails will prevent you from working 60 hours a week, while improving your relationship with your boss and getting the best work you’ve ever done. Here’s what Email #1 looks like: Subject: My plan for the week Jane, After reviewing my activities here is my plan for the week in order of priority. Planned Major Activities for the week 1) Complete project charter for X Project 2) Finish the financial analysis report that was started last week 3) Kick off Project X – requires planning and prep documentation creation. Open items that I will look into, but won’t get finished this week 1) Coordinate activities for year-end financial close 2) Research Y product for our shared service team Let me know if you have any comments. — Robbie OK, OK.

8 Great Tools to Block Online Distractions The problem with the web is there's just so much of it; an endless tide of funny videos, pop quizzes, and social alerts ready to distract you from other, more urgent tasks at hand. We wouldn't say there's anything inherently wrong with killing time online, but if you really need to buckle down on an important job then these tools should help. KeepMeOut KeepMeOut works in any browser, creating customised bookmarks that you use in place of standard links. StayFocusd StayFocusd is a free Chrome extension that lets you specify which websites you can visit and which are off limits. LeechBlock LeechBlock is perfect for Firefox users who want to take control over the sites and apps they're visiting online. Cold Turkey * You agree to be contacted by Future and our trusted third parties. Cold Turkey (Windows only) does exactly what its name suggests, blocking apps and websites on a schedule set by you in advance. SelfControl TomatoTimer Freedom

A Life of Productivity – 100 time, energy, and attention hacks to be more productive When I graduated University with a business degree last May, I received two incredible full-time job offers, both of which I declined because I had a plan. For exactly one year, from May 1, 2013, through May 1, 2014, I would devour everything I could get my hands on about productivity, and write every day about the lessons I learned on A Year of Productivity. Over the last 12 months I have conducted countless productivity experiments on myself, interviewed some of the most productive people in the world, and read a ton of books and academic literature on productivity, all to explore how I could become as productive as possible, and then write about the lessons I learned. One year, 197 articles, and over one million hits later, I’ve reached the end of my year-long journey, but not before going out with a bang. This article’s a long one, but it’s pretty skimmable! Without further ado, let’s jump in. To kick things off, here are a number of my favorite time hacks to both: Hacks to get more time

Related: