Kelly Gallagher – Resources

Kelly Gallagher – Resources
Part of the reason my students have such a hard time reading is because they bring little prior knowledge and background to the written page. They can decode the words, but the words remain meaningless without a foundation of knowledge. To help build my students’ prior knowledge, I assign them an "Article of the Week" every Monday morning. By the end of the school year I want them to have read 35 to 40 articles about what is going on in the world. It is not enough to simply teach my students to recognize theme in a given novel; if my students are to become literate, they must broaden their reading experiences into real-world text. Below you will find the articles I assigned* this year (2013-2014) to my students. "How Earth Got Its Tectonic Plates/On Saturn's Moon Titan, Scientists Catch Waves in Methane Lakes" by Monte Morin for the Los Angeles Times and by Amina Kahn for the Los Angeles Times, respectively "Hard Evidence: Are We Beating Cancer?"

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Articles of the Week Articles of the Week are utilized in all Reading and Literature classes weekly. Articles are available online for students to print from home and are updated on weekly. Expect to receive a new article each Wednesday. Articles will be due the following Wednesday. For questions about this week's assignment, please email Mrs. 30 Ideas for Teaching Writing Summary: Few sources available today offer writing teachers such succinct, practice-based help—which is one reason why 30 Ideas for Teaching Writing was the winner of the Association of Education Publishers 2005 Distinguished Achievement Award for Instructional Materials. The National Writing Project's 30 Ideas for Teaching Writing offers successful strategies contributed by experienced Writing Project teachers. Since NWP does not promote a single approach to teaching writing, readers will benefit from a variety of eclectic, classroom-tested techniques. These ideas originated as full-length articles in NWP publications (a link to the full article accompanies each idea below). Table of Contents: 30 Ideas for Teaching Writing

Pathways to the Common Core Book Study Bundle by Lucy Calkins, Mary Ehrenworth, Christopher Lehman - Heinemann Publishing Lucy Calkins, Teachers College Reading and Writing Project, Columbia University, Mary Ehrenworth, Teachers College Reading and Writing Project, Columbia University, Christopher Lehman ISBN 978-0-325-04394-4 / 0-325-04394-9 / 2012 / bundle Imprint: Heinemann Availability: In Stock Grade Level: K - 12th *Price and availability subject to change without notice. More Products From Lucy Calkins More Products From Mary Ehrenworth More Products From Christopher Lehman Using Games in the ELL Classroom, Part II UserID: iCustID: IsLogged: false IsSiteLicense: false UserType: anonymous

What Does Your Handwriting Say About You? A New Infographic by National Pen Did you know that how you write can indicate more than 5,000 personality traits? The size of your letters, spacing between words, shapes of letters and more can all signify different characteristics. Handwriting analysis (also known as graphology) can even be used for detecting lies and revealing possible health ailments. Check out the infographic below to learn what your handwriting says about you. It's also fun analyzing the handwriting of your friends and family members, so be sure to hand it off or pass it along! Mrs. Martinez's 6th Grade Language Arts Jefferson Middle School Friday, February 21, 2014 StarterGet out a piece of a paper and something to write with. ClassToday, students read and annotated Will Winter Ever End Abridged Article. Then, they worked on Article of the Week #9 – Sentence Types (skip #2) on their own or in groups while I gave out the scores for RIA #2. Please see me with questions about your scores.

The Sentence as a Miniature Narrative Draft is a series about the art and craft of writing. I like to imagine a sentence as a boat. Each sentence, after all, has a distinct shape, and it comes with something that makes it move forward or stay still — whether a sail, a motor or a pair of oars. Wondering About Common Core and Complex Text? - Common Core State Standards TOOLBOX "A lot of reading skills students can apply with a simple text, but can't do so much with a challenging text."- Dr. Timothy Shanahan Blocked from YouTube? No problem.

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