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Kelly Gallagher – Resources

Kelly Gallagher – Resources
Part of the reason my students have such a hard time reading is because they bring little prior knowledge and background to the written page. They can decode the words, but the words remain meaningless without a foundation of knowledge. To help build my students’ prior knowledge, I assign them an "Article of the Week" every Monday morning. Below you will find the articles I assigned* this year (2013-2014) to my students. "How Earth Got Its Tectonic Plates/On Saturn's Moon Titan, Scientists Catch Waves in Methane Lakes" by Monte Morin for the Los Angeles Times and by Amina Kahn for the Los Angeles Times, respectively "Hard Evidence: Are We Beating Cancer?" Looking for previous year's Article of the Week assignments? Related:  articles of the weekNewsNews

Articles of the Week | Vale Middle School Articles of the Week are utilized in all Reading and Literature classes weekly. Articles are available online for students to print from home and are updated on weekly. Expect to receive a new article each Wednesday. Articles will be due the following Wednesday. For questions about this week's assignment, please email Mrs. Students interested in receiving extra assistance completing AoWs are welcome to attend part-Fridays. VMS Articles of the Week were developed using strategies originally created by Kelly Gallagher and have been modified to meet the needs of Vale Middle School students using Oregon Department of Education reading sample guidelines and Common Core State Standards. Questions about completing articles? Click here to print a rubric for LITERARY TEXT or INFORMATIONAL TEXT. Student-created AoW guidelines for use in the classroom. DUE DATE 4/9/14 Pa. DUE DATE 4/2/14 The Truth Behind Baby Carrots (McCarthy, S., Fox News) Click here to print in MS Word Lexile: 1220

Linguistadores | Learn English, French, German, Dutch, Spanish Free 30 Ideas for Teaching Writing Summary: Few sources available today offer writing teachers such succinct, practice-based help—which is one reason why 30 Ideas for Teaching Writing was the winner of the Association of Education Publishers 2005 Distinguished Achievement Award for Instructional Materials. The National Writing Project's 30 Ideas for Teaching Writing offers successful strategies contributed by experienced Writing Project teachers. Since NWP does not promote a single approach to teaching writing, readers will benefit from a variety of eclectic, classroom-tested techniques. These ideas originated as full-length articles in NWP publications (a link to the full article accompanies each idea below). Table of Contents: 30 Ideas for Teaching Writing 1. Debbie Rotkow, a co-director of the Coastal Georgia Writing Project, makes use of the real-life circumstances of her first grade students to help them compose writing that, in Frank Smith's words, is "natural and purposeful." ROTKOW, DEBBIE. 2003. Back to top 2. 3. 4.

SNN - Student News Net Thank you for visiting SNN. For 10 years, the same team of professionals has been producing SNN with a sharp focus on original, interesting content as both a mediator and motivator for learning. SNN has spent years studying the challenge of providing meaningful integration of technology in the classroom, conducting educational research, and working closely with teachers. The bottom line is that SNN today is aligned to basic principles of learning to support student achievement. Motivating students to read and explore a topic in more depth is one of SNN's greatest strengths. SNN's only source of revenue is subscriptions. Click here to learn about SNN's subscription options! Judith Stanford Miller, M.Ed., M.A.

Accountability Services NOTE :: Various file formats are used on this page that may require download. If larger than 1mb, it will take longer to download. For instructions or more information, please visit our download page. The State Board of Education’s Framework for Change: The Next Generation of Assessments and Accountability provides for the modification and improvement of state assessment and accountability policies and practices. As part of this new direction, the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI) Accountability Services Division/North Carolina Testing Program has released one form of the test for each grade level and subject tested in the 2012–13 school year. These materials and the information contained within must not be used for personal or financial gain. Released test forms may be used by school systems to help acquaint students with valuable test taking strategies in summative assessment situations. The paper-and-pencil versions are available in a pdf format.

Article of the Week with Middle Schoolers « The Reading Zone Posted on January 25, 2010 by thereadingzone Last year, after reading Kelly Gallagher’s Readicide: How Schools Are Killing Reading and What You Can Do About It, I was inspired to start using an Article of the Week with my 6th graders. Like Gallagher, I see a distinctive lack of background knowledge with my students which makes it hard for them to read at times. Each Friday I hand out a new article. Every Friday at the beginning of class a volunteer summarizes the article and a few volunteers share their answers. The AOW has been the best decision I made this year. As far as assessment, each AOW is worth ten points. Like this: Like Loading... Filed under: article of the week Tagged: | article of the week

News in Easy English | Easy News for ESL Listening The Sentence as a Miniature Narrative Draft is a series about the art and craft of writing. I like to imagine a sentence as a boat. Each sentence, after all, has a distinct shape, and it comes with something that makes it move forward or stay still — whether a sail, a motor or a pair of oars. My analogy seems simple, but it’s not always easy to craft a sentence that makes heads turn with its sleekness and grace. Over the course of several articles, I will give you the tools to become a sentence connoisseur as well as a sentence artisan. At some point in our lives, early on, maybe in grade school, teachers give us a pat definition for a sentence — “It begins with a capital letter, ends with a period and expresses a complete thought.” Library of Congress But that definition misses the essence of sentencehood. For a sentence to be a sentence we need a What (the subject) and a So What (the predicate). I like to think of the whole sentence as a mini-narrative. “They shoot the white girl first.” — Toni Morrison, “Paradise”

Related:  Informational TextsWriting to Text IntroductionjanecurettebakerCommon Core State Standards