background preloader

Welcome to Forbes

Welcome to Forbes

http://www.forbes.com/special-report/2011/migration.html

Related:  QuatrièmeMapping Americapopulation datavizSocial Studies

25 maps that explain the English language by Libby Nelson on March 3, 2015 English is the language of Shakespeare and the language of Chaucer. It's spoken in dozens of countries around the world, from the United States to a tiny island named Tristan da Cunha. It reflects the influences of centuries of international exchange, including conquest and colonization, from the Vikings through the 21st century. Here are 25 maps and charts that explain how English got started and evolved into the differently accented languages spoken today. The origins of English

American migration map Overhauling his migration map from last year, Jon Bruner uses five year's worth of IRS data to map county migration in America: Each move had its own motivations, but in aggregate they ­reflect the geographical marketplace during the boom and bust of the last decade: Migrants flock to Las Vegas in 2005 in search of cheap, luxurious housing, then flee in 2009 as the city’s economy collapses; Miami beckons retirees from the North but offers little to its working-age residents, who leave for the West. Even fast-growing boomtowns like Charlotte, N.C., lose residents to their outlying counties as the demand for exurban tract-housing pushes workers ever outward. Compared to last year's map, this one is much improved. The colors are more subtle and more meaningful, and you can turn off the lines so that it's easier to see highlighted counties when the selected county had a lot of traffic during a selected year.

Internet History Sourcebooks Project Internet History Sourcebooks Project Paul Halsall, Editor Last Modified: Dec 11 | linked pages may have been updated more recently The Internet History Sourcebooks Project is a collection of public domain and copy-permitted historical texts presented cleanly (without advertising or excessive layout) for educational use. 1. This project is both very large and fairly old in Internet terms. Les dix meilleurs cartes de la ville de New york en 2015 Despite spending an inordinate amount of time each day looking at maps, it is beyond me to select a list of the best maps from among everything posted last year on the web. There are far too many, more than I could ever hope to find, for the list to have any real meaning. Sticking to what I know best, I have compiled my favorite maps of 2015 that cover New York City. Because of its density and diversity of people and culture, its high availability of public data, and its large tech community, New York makes for some outstanding maps.

Comparing US states with countries: US equivalents Which countries match the GDP and population of America's states? IT HAS long been true that California on its own would rank as one of the biggest economies of the world. These days, it would rank eighth, falling between Italy and Brazil on a nominal exchange-rate basis. But how do other American states compare with other countries? Taking the nearest equivalent country from 2009 data reveals some surprises. Who would have thought that, despite years of auto-industry hardship, the economy of Michigan is still the same size as Taiwan's? Dencity Dencity maps population density using circles of various size and hue. Larger, darker circles show areas with fewer people, while smaller, brighter circles highlight crowded cities. Representing denser areas with smaller circles results in additional geographic detail where there are more people, while sparsely populated areas are more vaguely defined. Read more about how Dencity was made.

Today in History: Surrender at Yorktown Featured Image: Winged Time April 3, 2014 By Barat PSN Leave a Comment Curator’s note from the Library of Congress online exhibition: The Dream of Flight On these pages, the English poet and illustrator, William Blake, depicts the personification of “Time” as having wings.

131 - US States Renamed For Countries With Similar GDPs by Frank Jacobs Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is a convenient way of measuring and comparing the size of national economies. Annual GDP represents the market value of all goods and services produced within a country in a year. Put differently: Where Are The Jobs? Where Are The Jobs? Employment in America, 2010 Leaflet | Jobs: Map data from US Census LEHD, Imagery by Robert Manduca under CC BY 4.0, Background: Map tiles by Stamen Design, under CC BY 3.0. Data by OpenStreetMap, under ODbL. Interactive - NatGeoMag Population The World of Seven Billion The map shows population density; the brightest points are the highest densities. Each country is colored according to its average annual gross national income per capita, using categories established by the World Bank (see key below). Some nations— like economic powerhouses China and India—have an especially wide range of incomes. But as the two most populous countries, both are lower middle class when income is averaged per capita.

42 Interactive History Lessons From Google If you’re looking for a free and useful tool to help bring history to life, Google has you covered. The search giant has been making big strides into education lately and classrooms around the world are benefiting. The Google Cultural Institute is an elegantly designed but elaborate resource that offers a glimpse into key happenings from years past. The website uses a horizontal-scrolling timeline view to help create a sense of time passing. There’s multimedia, interaction, and a lot to learn. Here’s a few more details from Google : Here’s Every Single Job in America, Mapped Data for GOOD Knowledge is the first step on the way to progress. Over a recent break from school, Harvard sociology Ph.D. candidate Robert Manduca whipped up a fascinating visualization of the geography of American jobs, powered by data sets from the U.S.

Related: