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A History of Ancient Rome

A History of Ancient Rome

http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/a_history_of_ancient_rome.htm

Related:  Cultura classica - ClassicsAncient RomeThe RomansEurope

Classical Reception Studies Network The Classical Reception Studies Network (CRSN) aims to facilitate the exchange of information and to encourage collaboration in the field of classical reception studies by bringing together departments and individuals from across the world. Classical Reception Studies is the inquiry into how and why the texts, images and material cultures of Ancient Greece and Rome have been received, adapted, refigured, used and abused in later times and often other places. For more information on the Network and its history, please go to the Network page which explains who we are and what we do. The Events section lists current and future Classical Reception conferences, seminars, workshops and performances. "Happy Birthday, everyone - and many happy returns!"

Gracchi Brothers The social and political landscape of the Roman world was about to undergo an abrupt transformation in the Late Republic. The emergence, and eventual assassination of the Gracchus brothers, Tiberius and Gaius, is often considered the first major step towards the fall of the Roman Republic. While Roman class and social affairs had for centuries consisted of machinations by various individuals to get their way (such as the Plebs withdrawal from Rome in the early Republic), the activities of the Gracchi completely altered the state of Roman politics. The careers of these two men were marked by riots, murder, and ultimately, outright manipulation of the common population to achieve their goals.

Roman Daily Life (Article) From the early days of the Roman Republic through the volatile reigns of such ignoble emperors as Caligula, Nero, and Commodus, the Roman Empire continued to expand, stretching its borders to encompass the entire Mediterranean Sea as well as expanding northward to Gaul and Britain. History records the exploits of the heroes as well as the tirades of the emperors. Despite the sometimes shameful deeds of the imperial office, the empire was built on the backs of its citizens - the unsung people who lived a relatively quiet existence, and who are often ignored by history. Rome was a cosmopolitan city with Greeks, Syrians, Jews, North Africans, Spaniards, Gauls, and Britons, and like any society, the average Roman citizen awoke each morning, labored, relaxed, and ate, and while his or her daily life could often be hectic, he or she would always survive. Population Movement

Secrets of Lost Empires by Dennis Gaffney Aqueducts are one of the wonders of the Roman Empire. These graceful structures are not only majestic, but are engineering marvels that survive to this day. In "Construct an Aqueduct," you are hired as Chief Water Engineer by the Roman Emperor. Your job: to build an aqueduct that will supply the Roman city of Aqueductis with clean water to private homes, public baths and glorious fountains. Topics - History.com Articles, Video, Pictures and Facts You're almost done! You will soon receive an activation email. Once you click on the link, you will be added to our list. If you do not receive this email, please contact us.

Warburg Institute digital copy antiquities Catalogue Articles You are not logged in | My saved items (0 items) | Login Give Feedback These Photos of Pompeii Show Slice of Ancient Roman Life that Was Buried Under 20 Feet of Ash - History Daily Sep 172016 On August 24, 79 AD, Mount Vesuvius, a 4,000-foot volcano near the Bay of Naples in Italy, erupted, burrying the city of Pompeii under an almost 20-foot blanket of volcanic ash and killing 2,000 people. It was one of the world’s most famous and deadly volcanic eruptions.

Roman Clothing Roman clothing owed much to that of ancient Greece, but it had distinct forms of its own. In all the ancient world, first and foremost clothes needed to be simple. As for possible materials there was only really one. Wool, although to some extent linen was also available. The needles of the day were coarse and unwieldy by modern standards.

Camelot International: Britain's Heritage and History Heritage > Medieval Life Religion in the Middle Ages Most people in medieval Europe were very religious. LacusCurtius — Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities LacusCurtius Educational Resource: a Selection of Articles from A 19th-Century Classical Encyclopaedia William Smith, D.C.L., LL.D.: A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities John Murray, London, 1875. This single volume, of 1294 pages in rather fine print set in two columns and amounting to well over a million words, is a treasure trove of information on the ancient world, and was for many years a standard reference work, carried thru several British and American editions from the first in 1842 to the last in 1890‑91 with relatively few alterations.

Roman Houses and Villas The Roman House An Elementary Conspectus Handbooks tend to distinguish among three basic types of late Republic/early imperial houses, as follows. In developmental terms: the "atrium house" is said to be the original "Italic" house, followed by the introduction of the peristyle garden in Hellenistic times; the peristyle gradually dominates, and the atrium is eventually lost altogether, perhaps under influence of Domitian's palace (said to be modelled on Hellenistic Greek palaces, and lacking an atrium). But this evolutionary model remains in lively dispute: cf. e.g. Wallace-Hadrill in Laurence 1997.

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