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Building Thought Leadership through Content Curation

Building Thought Leadership through Content Curation

http://www.slideshare.net/corinnew/building-thought-leadership-through-content-curation

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Education & Resources - National Women's History Museum - NWHM Author, lecturer, and chief philosopher of the woman’s rights movement, Elizabeth Cady Stanton formulated the agenda for woman’s rights that has guided the struggle to the present. Born in November 1815 in Johnstown, New York, Elizabeth Cady was the daughter of Margaret Livingston and Daniel Cady, Johnstown's most prominent citizens. She received her formal education at the Johnstown Academy and at Emma Willard's Troy Female Seminary in New York. Her father provided her with an informal legal education too. Well educated for a woman, Cady married abolitionist lecturer Henry Stanton, and had 7 children. On their honeymoon in London to attend a World’s Anti-Slavery convention, she and Lucretia Mott were angered at the exclusion of women and vowed to call a woman’s rights convention.

Content Curation for Teachers  Have you ever felt that there is simply too much interesting, educational content on the web? Fortunately, there are also some great, free products that help learners curate all of the many things they can read, watch, hear etc. on the web. The beauty of taking control of your content by saving and organizing links is that you can quickly find, revisit or share content with others. By curating the web, one can essentially build up a library of data in the cloud for free. I know personally as a history teacher, I spend a lot of time surfing the web when I prepare lessons. The Seven Needs of Real-Time Curators I keep hearing people throw around the word “curation” at various conferences, most recently at SXSW. The thing is most of the time when I dig into what they are saying they usually have no clue about what curation really is or how it could be applied to the real-time world. So, over the past few months I’ve been talking to tons of entrepreneurs about the tools that curators actually need and I’ve identified seven things.

How Can Web 2.0 Curation Tools Be Used in the Classroom? Digital Tools Jeff Thomas “Curation” may be one of the big buzzwords of 2011. Robert Scoble Interview “A curator is an information chemist. He or she mixes atoms together in a way to build an info-molecule. Then adds value to that molecule” – Robert Scoble Master curator and Microsoft evangelist Robert Scoble gave an interview to Howard Rheingold on how to be a good curator (see below) and gave away some great advice on mastering the art and science of content curation using social media and other digital technologies. Here is a collection of my favorite quotes from Scoble’s interview with Rheingold. I’ll provide some context around Scoble’s quotes from the interview as well as my personal interpretation. 6 Content Curation Templates for Content Annotation A fundamental part of content curation is adding annotation and commentary to third-party content you choose to share. It’s easy for novice curators to simply focus on finding and sharing relevant content while overlooking the importance of annotating your content with your own perspective. Annotating your content is crucial for a few reasons:

Is Content Curation in Your Skill Set? It Should Be. by David Kelly “Curation is an important skill to develop, especially in an environment in which more and more organizations shift towards self-directed learning for their workers. Now is the time for learning and performance professionals to develop this new skill set.” Curation is a term that is rapidly growing in popularity and is directly impacting the world of workplace learning and performance. In a world where the amount of information available to workers doubles every 18 to 24 months, it is impossible to keep up with the seemingly endless supply of it.

Manifesto For The Content Curator: The Next Big Social Media Job Of The Future ? Every hour thousands of new videos are uploaded online. Blog posts are written and published. Millions of tweets and other short messages are shared. To say there is a flood of content being created online now seems like a serious understatement. Until now, the interesting thing is that there are relatively few technologies or tools that have been adopted in a widespread way to manage this deluge. We pretty much just have algorithmic search, with Google (and other search engines) as the most obvious example. To Get the Most Out of Tablets, Use Smart Curation By Justin Reich and Beth Holland The Someday/Monday dichotomy captures one of the core challenges in teacher professional development around education technology. On the one hand, deep integration of new learning technologies into classrooms requires substantially rethinking pedagogy, curriculum, assessment, and teacher practice (someday), because for technology to make a real difference in student learning, it can’t just be an add-on. On the other hand, teachers need to start somewhere (Monday), and one of the easiest ways for teachers to get experience with emerging tools is to play and experiment in lightweight ways: to use technology as a substitution for something that they have previously tried in the past. Teachers recognize the need to imagine a new future, to strive towards the creation of innovative, technology-rich learning environments that provide our students with the best possible experience (someday).

Is Content Curation in Your Skill Set? It Should Be. by David Kelly “Curation is an important skill to develop, especially in an environment in which more and more organizations shift towards self-directed learning for their workers. Now is the time for learning and performance professionals to develop this new skill set.” Curation is a term that is rapidly growing in popularity and is directly impacting the world of workplace learning and performance. In a world where the amount of information available to workers doubles every 18 to 24 months, it is impossible to keep up with the seemingly endless supply of it. In his book Curation Nation, Steven Rosenbaum describes it this way: “Curation replaces noise with clarity.

Science and Curation: the New Practice of Web 2.0 The Internet now makes it possible to publish and share billions of data items every day, accessible to over 2 billion people worldwide. This mass of information makes it difficult, when searching, to extract the relevant and useful information from the background noise. It should be added that these searches are time-consuming and can take much longer than the time we actually have to spend on them. Today, Google and specialized search engines such as Google Scholar are based on established algorithms. But are these algorithms sufficiently in line with users’ needs? What if the web needed a human brain to select and put forward the relevant information and not just the information based on “popularity” and lexical and semantic operations?

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