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The Science of Sarcasm? Yeah, Right

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/The-Science-of-Sarcasm-Yeah-Right.html

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The Mind is a Metaphor: As It Were As It Were · 2006-09-27 by Brad Pasanek Must we mean what we say? In the case of metaphor, meaning is underspecified, patently false, or—according to some theorists—somehow transmuted. Somehow changed. Words must mean just what they mean.1 But what of speakers? What of writers? A Brief Guide to Embodied Cognition: Why You Are Not Your Brain Embodied cognition, the idea that the mind is not only connected to the body but that the body influences the mind, is one of the more counter-intuitive ideas in cognitive science. In sharp contrast is dualism, a theory of mind famously put forth by Rene Descartes in the 17th century when he claimed that “there is a great difference between mind and body, inasmuch as body is by nature always divisible, and the mind is entirely indivisible… the mind or soul of man is entirely different from the body.” In the proceeding centuries, the notion of the disembodied mind flourished. From it, western thought developed two basic ideas: reason is disembodied because the mind is disembodied and reason is transcendent and universal. However, as George Lakoff and Rafeal Núñez explain:

Daniel Everett: Endangered Languages Good evening, I am Laura Welcher from The Long Now Foundation. I am the director of the Rosetta Project. Some of you may know, this summer, we finished our first prototype Rosetta disk, after 8 years of work, and so now five copies of that disk are out there in the world, that is to the very long-term archive of the Rosetta Project as you know is a collection of the world’s languages. The Two Year Window A decade ago, a neuroscientist named Charles Nelson traveled to Bucharest to visit Romania’s infamous orphanages. There, he saw a child whose brain had swelled to the size of a basketball because of an untreated infection and a malnourished one-year-old no bigger than a newborn. But what has stayed with him ever since was the eerie quiet of the infant wards.

Long Space Missions Can Give Astronauts Blurry Vision, Study Finds Sending astronauts on long space missions can affect how they see once they return to Earth, a new study reveals. In the study, scientists studied the effects of long-duration missions on the eyesight of seven astronauts and found that some problems, including blurry vision, can continue long after the spaceflyers land back on Earth. The findings could affect how future long space voyages, such as to trips an asteroid or Mars, may be planned, researchers said. The astronauts participating in the study were all around the age of 50 and spent at least six continuous months in space during missions to the International Space Station.

Imagine A Flying Pig: How Words Take Shape In The Brain : Shots - Health News hide captionAlthough a flying pig doesn't exist in the real world, our brains use what we know about pigs and birds — and superheroes — to create one in our mind's eye when we hear or read those words. iStockphoto.com Although a flying pig doesn't exist in the real world, our brains use what we know about pigs and birds — and superheroes — to create one in our mind's eye when we hear or read those words.

13 Wonderful Old English Words We Should Still Be Using Today As the years pass, language evolves. Since the days of Chaucer and Shakespeare, we can all agree English has become less flowery. Some fantastic vocabulary just dropped out of everyday conversation. Author Mark Forsyth writes about the words we’ve lost. From his book “Horologicon” to his Tumblr and published articles, we compiled a list of the best words that need reviving. 1. Keith Chen: language that forecasts weather — and behavior By Keith Chen How are China, Estonia and Germany different from India, Greece and the UK? To an economist, one answer is obvious: savings rates.

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