background preloader

The Flipped Classroom

The Flipped Classroom
Four years ago, in the shadow of Colorado’s Pike’s Peak, veteran Woodland Park High School chemistry teachers Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams stumbled onto an idea. Struggling to find the time to reteach lessons for absent students, they plunked down $50, bought software that allowed them to record and annotate lessons, and posted them online. Absent students appreciated the opportunity to see what they missed. But, surprisingly, so did students who hadn’t missed class. They, too, used the online material, mostly to review and reinforce classroom lessons. And, soon, Bergmann and Sams realized they had the opportunity to radically rethink how they used class time. It’s called “the flipped classroom.” Flipped classroom teachers almost universally agree that it’s not the instructional videos on their own, but how they are integrated into an overall approach, that makes the difference. “Flipping” is rapidly moving into the mainstream. But the ideas behind flipping are not brand new.

http://educationnext.org/the-flipped-classroom/

How the Flipped Classroom Is Radically Transforming Learning Editor's Note:Posts about the flipped class on The Daily Riff beginning in January 2011 have generated over 240,000 views to-date - thanks contributors and readers . . . See our other links related to the flipped class below this guest post. Since this post was written, Bergmann and Sams have released their book, Flip your Classroom: Reach Every Student in Every Class Every Day. 8 Crucial Resources For Flipped Classrooms Have you “flipped” yet? My colleagues have this week; it’s PSSA week in Pennsylvania (PSSAs are standardized tests.). That’s not the flipped I meant, however. I meant, have you flipped your classroom yet? Well, if you have or are thinking about it, here are some tools you might want to consider using for those after-hours background knowledge sessions.

Flipped Classroom Resources The traditional pattern of education is to have classroom lectures, in which the teacher explains a topic, followed by homework, in which the student does exercises. In flip teaching, the student first studies the topic by himself, typically using video lessons created by the teacher, and classtime is used to work through assignments. This format allows teachers to answer individual student's questions and create interactive learning activities. General Info PBS LearningMediaLearn how to flip your classroom with PBS LearningMedia.

8 Observations on flipping the classroom One of the more unfortunate buzzwords to appear in online education circles and the press is “flipping the classroom”. This means that instead of lecturing students in lessons in school, the teacher records the lecture as a video and uploads it to YouTube – or recommends other people’s videos to the students. The students watch the videos for homework, freeing up the lesson for interactivity, project work and so on. Would you REALLY want to watch this every night?!I not impressed with this brilliant “new” idea. Flipped Classrooms — Tennessee Teaching and Learning Center by guest writer Karen Brinkley If asked to describe a traditional college classroom and style of pedagogy, most people would probably think of students who come to a classroom of chairs in rows to listen to a professor deliver a lecture, and who then did textbook readings and assignments at home. Yet those who have experienced a flipped classroom would describe something completely different. Flipping classrooms is a fairly recent and growing trend sweeping through classrooms across the country.

Flipping the Classroom “Flipping the classroom” has become something of a buzzword in the last several years, driven in part by high profile publications in The New York Times (Fitzpatrick, 2012); The Chronicle of Higher Education (Berrett, 2012); and Science (Mazur, 2009); In essence, “flipping the classroom” means that students gain first exposure to new material outside of class, usually via reading or lecture videos, and then use class time to do the harder work of assimilating that knowledge, perhaps through problem-solving, discussion, or debates. In terms of Bloom’s revised taxonomy (2001), this means that students are doing the lower levels of cognitive work (gaining knowledge and comprehension) outside of class, and focusing on the higher forms of cognitive work (application, analysis, synthesis, and/or evaluation) in class, where they have the support of their peers and instructor. What is it?

Debating the 'Flipped Classroom' at Stanford - Wired Campus Stanford University got lots of attention for inviting the public to participate in a series of free online computer-science classes. One thing that’s drawn less notice is how some of the technologies that help facilitate those mega-classes are changing the experience for Stanford students learning the same subjects. Now a Stanford student is provoking a debate on those innovations, with a blog post critiquing the rigor and format of the “flipped classroom” teaching method deployed in his machine-learning course. In one version of that course offered to Stanford students, the traditional teaching format was inverted, with lectures presented through online videos and optional once-a-week class meetings devoted to problem solving with the professor. The videos, plus auto-graded assignments, were also offered to the public in the free online version of the machine-learning class. As of November, a staggering 94,000 people had signed up to take that course.

Five Best Practices for the Flipped Classroom Ok, I'll be honest. I get very nervous when I hear education reformists and politicians tout how "incredible" the flipped-classroom model, or how it will "solve" many of the problems of education. It doesn't solve anything. It is a great first step in reframing the role of the teacher in the classroom. Trends in Ed: Misconceptions About the Flipped Classroom Model The Chronicle recently had an article about how a student is sparking debate about the Flipped Classroom model. This is a result of Stanford’s increasing amount of online classes, including the ones that are free to anyone. Standford has an Applied Machine Learning course, which is taught completely online, and the student in the article has expressed his dissatisfaction on how the online class does not allow him to interact with other students and has no in-person lecturing, on a hacking website. It should be noted however that there is a traditional, in-person Applied Machine Learning course in addition to a one day a week optional in class session where students and professor practice applying the knowledge. It is time to start clearing the misconceptions about the Flipped Classroom model, since reading the article showed that people are starting to misunderstand the purpose of the model.

‘Flipped’ classes take learning to new places Since the start of the school year, many of Wayne Tsai’s math students have been watching his lectures at home or in the computer lab. They take notes and jot down questions about his algebra and geometry lessons and then return to Tsai’s classroom the next day, ready to apply what they’ve learned to problems and projects that traditionally would have been assigned as homework. The practice — known as “the flipped classroom” because of the reversed roles of lectures and homework — has helped students understand the lessons better and move through them more quickly, Tsai said. More class time is now spent on projects and extra help for those who need it. “It was something I’ve never done before, and I was nervous to learn at home,” said Jessica Hutchinson, 16, a student in Tsai’s class at Hilliard Darby High School. “But I liked it.

Related: