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Meet the man who makes fake news for millions of conservative Trump supporters

Meet the man who makes fake news for millions of conservative Trump supporters
The only light in the house came from the glow of three computer monitors, and Christopher Blair, 46, sat down at a keyboard and started to type. His wife had left for work and his children were on their way to school, but waiting online was his other community, an unreality where nothing was exactly as it seemed. He logged onto his website and began to invent his first news story of the day. "BREAKING," he wrote, pecking out each letter with his index fingers as he considered the possibilities. Maybe he would announce Hillary Clinton had died during a secret overseas mission to smuggle more refugees into America. Maybe he would award President Donald Trump the Nobel Peace Prize for his courage in denying climate change. A new message popped onto Blair's screen from a friend who helped with his website. Join Independent Minds For exclusive articles, events and an advertising-free read for just £5.99 €6.99 $9.99 a month Get the best of The Independent "Good morning, Shirley! "Gross.

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/fake-news-donald-trump-facebook-last-line-of-defense-conservatives-social-media-a8639981.html

Related:  How to Think Critically. Fake NewsAlternate Truth

The 12 cognitive biases that prevent you from being rational The human brain is capable of 1016 processes per second, which makes it far more powerful than any computer currently in existence. But that doesn't mean our brains don't have major limitations. The lowly calculator can do math thousands of times better than we can, and our memories are often less than useless — plus, we're subject to cognitive biases, those annoying glitches in our thinking that cause us to make questionable decisions and reach erroneous conclusions. Here are a dozen of the most common and pernicious cognitive biases that you need to know about. Before we start, it's important to distinguish between cognitive biases and logical fallacies.

Evaluating Sources in a ‘Post-Truth’ World Back in 2015, when we published our lesson plan Fake News vs. Real News: Determining the Reliability of Sources, we had no way of knowing that, a year later, the Oxford Dictionaries would declare “post-truth” the 2016 word of the year; that fake news would play a role in the 2016 presidential election; that it would cause real violence; and that the president-elect of the United States would use the term to condemn mainstream media outlets he opposes. Back then, to convince teachers that the skill was important, we quoted Peter Adams of the News Literacy Project on the “digital naïveté” of the “digital natives” we teach. Now, however, we doubt that we need to convince anyone. These days, invented stories created in a “fake news factory”— or by a 23-year-old in need of cash — go viral, while articles from traditional sources like The Times are called “fake news” by those who see them as hostile to their agenda.

Is NASA Planning to Geoengineer Yellowstone’s Supervolcano Threat Away? Despite repeatedly claiming that the Yellowstone caldera does not pose a super-eruption risk in our lifetimes, NASA has admitted the threat is real and is working to geoengineer a solution to negate that risk. In the realm of of science-based clickbait, no topic is more reliable for delivering page views and social media shares than claims that the pool of magma sitting below Yellowstone National Park is about to erupt in a humanity-ending cataclysm. As we have repeatedly, exhaustingly, and redundantly reported, the likelihood of that mega-disaster’s occurring in the next couple of thousand years is extremely low, and the region is monitored continuously for threatening activity which would provide ample warning if that situation were to change for some currently unknown reason.

1/1/17: How to Convince Someone When Facts Fail Have you ever noticed that when you present people with facts that are contrary to their deepest held beliefs they always change their minds? Me neither. In fact, people seem to double down on their beliefs in the teeth of overwhelming evidence against them. The reason is related to the worldview perceived to be under threat by the conflicting data. Creationists, for example, dispute the evidence for evolution in fossils and DNA because they are concerned about secular forces encroaching on religious faith.

Media Bias Chart, 3.1 Minor Updates Based on Constructive Feedback - ad fontes media So why is it time for another update to the Media Bias Chart? I’m a strong believer in changing one’s mind based on new information. That’s how we learn anyway, and I wish people would do it more often. I think it would lead to nicer online discussions and less polarization in our politics. Fake news websites in the United States Fake news websites in the United States are fake news websites that deliberately publish fake news, but specifically target American audiences by creating or inflaming controversial topics such as the 2016 election.[1][2] Most fake news websites target readers by impersonating or pretending to be real news organizations,[3] which can lead to legitimate news organizations further spreading their message.[4] Most notable in the media are the many websites that made completely false claims about political candidates usually focusing on Hillary Clinton and President Donald Trump,[5] as part of a larger campaign to gain viewers and ad revenue or spread disinformation.[6] Additionally, satire websites have received criticism for not properly notifying readers that they are publishing false or satirical content, since many readers have been duped by seemingly legitimate articles.[7][8] Definition[edit] Methods[edit] Clickbait[edit]

News Feed – Updated 6/22/17 – Center for News Literacy Poynter: Knight Foundation awards $1 million to projects aimed at fighting misinformation (June 22, 2017) Education Week: Media/News Literacy Training Goes a Long Way for Teachers (video) (June 21, 2017)DallasNews.com: Small Texas paper's name co-opted by Ukrainian site to peddle fake news (May 27, 2017)NorthJersey.com: Teaching news literacy in the age of fake news (May 19, 2017) Voice of America: Schools, Universities Teach Students the Truth About Fake News (April 5, 2017) The Guardian: New fake news dilemma: sites publish real scoops amid mess of false reports (May 16, 2017)WOSU Public Media: Fake News Discussion on All Sides with Ann Fisher (April 18, 2017) The Washington Post: Colleges turn 'fake news' epidemic into a teachable moment (April 6, 2017)New York Times: In an Era of Fake News, Teaching Students to Parse Fact From Fiction (March 20, 2016) Vice: Can Librarians Save Us from Fake News? Moyers and Company Making Sense of the News Series - Written by CNL's Michael Spikes

Don't be fooled by fake images and videos online One month before the 2016 U.S. presidential election, an “Access Hollywood” recording of Donald Trump was released in which he was heard lewdly talking about women. The then-candidate and his campaign apologized and dismissed the remarks as harmless. At the time, the authenticity of the recording was never questioned. Just two years later, the public finds itself in a dramatically different landscape in terms of believing what it sees and hears. Advances in artificial intelligence have made it easier to create compelling and sophisticated fake images, videos and audio recordings. Meanwhile, misinformation proliferates on social media, and a polarized public may have become accustomed to being fed news that conforms to their worldview.

Did a Black Woman Named Malinda Borden Perish Because Titanic's Lifeboats Were 'Whites Only?' A photograph purportedly showing a woman named “Malinda Borden” is frequently shared on social media along with the claim that she had worked aboard the RMS Titanic and drowned at sea when that ship sank on its maiden voyage, as lifeboat seats were only made available to white passengers. Her name, according to the viral Facebook post, was nearly lost to history because the black workers who perished during the disaster were listed as property that was lost, rather than being included in the list of victims: <img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-186737" src=" alt="" data-recalc-dims="1">TITANIC VICTIM MALINDA BORDEN was drowned at sea as she was working aboard the Titanic. Life boats were made available to WHITE women and WHITE children ONLY. The Black workers were not listed among the passengers or victims. They were only listed among property that was lost.

People who think their opinions are superior to others are most prone to overestimating their relevant knowledge and ignoring chances to learn more By guest blogger Tom Stafford We all know someone who is convinced their opinion is better than everyone else’s on a topic – perhaps, even, that it is the only correct opinion to have. Maybe, on some topics, you are that person. No psychologist would be surprised that people who are convinced their beliefs are superior think they are better informed than others, but this fact leads to a follow on question: are people actually better informed on the topics for which they are convinced their opinion is superior? This is what Michael Hall and Kaitlin Raimi set out to check in a series of experiments in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology.

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