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Twitter is closer to emulate a Neural Network than Facebook

Twitter is closer to emulate a Neural Network than Facebook
When we think of Twitter and the innovation behind it, the first thing we all think is 140. 140 characters is without a doubt an amazing innovation that Twitter introduced which makes communication flow faster, forces twitters to summarize a piece of news or information, or an idea or an opinion and allows followers to get information or an idea faster as well. Also, after the introduction of url shorteners (tinyurl,com originally and many others later on such as bit.ly) an emergent property of Twitter came to life: the linked web. Any blog post or news article out there could be potentially linked multiple times in Twitter with quick summaries and opinions. Other emerging properties or elements in Twitter are:. Tags, early on twitters started using tags as a way to group events or themes together and follow them separately.. Curated content appeared more recently in an attempt to organize tweets in channels like mode.

http://www.evoluzination.com/2011/05/twitter-is-closer-to-emulate-neural.html

Is Twitter a Complex Adaptive System I’ve seen a bunch of posts bubble up over the past few days that are really sparking my curiousity about what is really going on with Twitter, so I need to do a little brain dump. Bear with me. Insight #1 Is Neuroscience the Death of Free Will? The Stone is a forum for contemporary philosophers and other thinkers on issues both timely and timeless. Is free will an illusion? Some leading scientists think so. For instance, in 2002 the psychologist Daniel Wegner wrote, “It seems we are agents. It seems we cause what we do… It is sobering and ultimately accurate to call all this an illusion.” More recently, the neuroscientist Patrick Haggard declared, “We certainly don’t have free will.

The Neuroscience Revolution is Here: 5 Ways To Supercharge Your Brain With TechnologyTheFeelGoodLifestyle.com “The brain is the last and grandest biological frontier, the most complex thing we have yet discovered in our universe. It contains hundreds of billions of cells interlinked through trillions of connections. The brain boggles the mind.” Temple Grandin Early life and education[edit] Grandin was born in Boston, Massachusetts, to Eustacia Cutler and Richard Grandin. She was diagnosed with autism at the age of two in 1949. Diagnosed and labeled with brain damage, at that early age she was placed in a structured nursery school with what she considers to have been good teachers. After Grandin's mother spoke to a doctor who suggested speech therapy, she hired a nanny who spent hours playing turn-taking games with Grandin and her sister.[3]

La conciencia humana va mucho más allá de la actividad cerebral: La dimensión cuántica del ser humano Por primera vez de forma sistematizada, la comunidad científica conviene en señalar que la conciencia humana enlaza con la dimensión de la física cuántica y no con la neurociencia, tal y como hasta ahora tradicionalmente se venía entendiendo. La cuestión estrictamente biofísica ha sido ampliamente debatida sin obtener respuestas, que curiosamente sí se encuentran en los nuevos conceptos de la teoría de supercuerdas y especialmente de la supersimetría. La cuestión de base genera una inquietud creciente en la comunidad neurocientífica, ya que a medida que profundizan en el campo de la ciencia de la conciencia, los hallazgos son cada vez más contundentes. Conceptos como los biofotones, la meditación, las Resonancias Schumann, ponen de relieve que los procesos neurofisiológicos son consecuencias de una transdimensionalidad y no causa en sí misma de una estricta explicación anatómica, o química. Definitivamente el ser humano es mucho más que un cerebro.

The Science of Why We Don't Believe Science Illustration: Jonathon Rosen "A MAN WITH A CONVICTION is a hard man to change. Tell him you disagree and he turns away. Show him facts or figures and he questions your sources. Appeal to logic and he fails to see your point." So wrote the celebrated Stanford University psychologist Leon Festinger (PDF), in a passage that might have been referring to climate change denial—the persistent rejection, on the part of so many Americans today, of what we know about global warming and its human causes.

What does a doodle do? It boosts your memory and concentration You know you're bored when you start shading in the squares of your notebook. Apparently it's a habit that could be helping you to concentrate. In a neat little experiment, Jackie Andrade asked forty participants to listen to a monotone two and a half minute phone message about arrangements for a party. They were told the message would be dull, that there was no need to memorise it, but that they should write down the names of the people who would be able to attend the party. Crucially, half the participants were also told to 'doodle' as they listened, by shading in the squares and circles of their note-paper.

Brain Parts Function The brain is the most complex organ in the body. It is the organ that allows us to think, have emotions, move, and even dream. Given this complexity, it should not be surprising that there are many ways to separate the parts of the brain. Brain parts can be separated on the basis of what they look like to the naked eye, under a microscope, or by what certain brain parts do. The brain and spinal cord make up the central nervous system and all of the nerves found in our body make up the peripheral nervous system.

More Deja Vu Theories" The Hologram Theory Dutch psychiatrist Hermon Sno proposed the idea that memories are like holograms, meaning that you can recreate the entire three-dimensional image from any fragment of the whole. The smaller the fragment, however, the fuzzier the ultimate picture. Déjà vu, he says, happens when some detail in the environment we are currently in (a sight, sound, smell, et cetera) is similar to some remnant of a memory of our past and our brain recreates an entire scene from that fragment. Other researchers also agree that some small piece of familiarity may be the seed that creates the déjà vu feeling. For example, you might go for a ride with a friend in an old 1964 Plymouth and have a strong déjà vu experience without actually remembering (or even being aware of the fact) that your grandfather had the same type of car and you're actually remembering riding in that car as a small child.

Neuroscience Movies "...And when he came to the place where the wild things are they roared their terrible roars and gnashed their terrible teeth and rolled their terrible eyes and showed their terrible claws till Max said "BE STILL!" and tamed them with the magic trick of staring into all their yellow eyes without blinking once and they were frightened and called him the most wild thing of all and made him king of all wild things."--- Maurice Sendak, Where the Wild Things Are "Feral" means wild or existing in a natural state. Feral children are those who have been abandoned or lost in the wilderness and have spent a significant amount of their formative years there. These child have lived without any direct human contact and often with the aid of wild animals who have adopted them into their groups.

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