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Writing History in the Digital Age

Writing History in the Digital Age
Buy the book or read for free online from the University of Michigan Press. Has the digital revolution transformed how we write about the past — or not? Have new technologies changed our essential work-craft as scholars, and the ways in which we think, teach, author, and publish? Does the digital age have broader implications for individual writing processes, or for the historical profession at large? Explore these questions in Writing History in the Digital Age, an open peer-reviewed volume published in open-access online format (for free) and in print (for sale) from the University of Michigan Press, as part of its Digital Humanities Series and the digitalculturebooks imprint. See also the open peer review editions with commentary below:

http://writinghistory.trincoll.edu/

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Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities These NEH grants support national or regional (multistate) training programs for scholars and advanced graduate students to broaden and extend their knowledge of digital humanities. Through these programs, NEH seeks to increase the number of humanities scholars using digital technology in their research and to broadly disseminate knowledge about advanced technology tools and methodologies relevant to the humanities. The projects may be a single opportunity or offered multiple times to different audiences. Institutes may be as short as a few days and held at multiple locations or as long as six weeks at a single site. For example, training opportunities could be offered before or after regularly occurring scholarly meetings, during the summer months, or during appropriate times of the academic year.

ProfHacker Many of us have favorite tools that suit our workflows well, helping us accomplish our tasks and keep track of needed bits of information. Below you’ll find a list of applications, services, and utilities that I use almost daily. Workflow. Springing Into Digital Research Projects Over the last 18 months in Media 21, students have created a variety of learning products: traditional research papers, collaboratively written research papers, digital learning portfolios (which included multigenre elements), and information dashboards (Netvibes). In thinking about this spring’s research project on veterans’ issues and how to meet our students are their point of need while pushing their thinking, Susan Lester (my co-teacher) and I decided to go focus on students creating a digital research project (see details above in the embedded project document). After engaging in presearch for three days this week, students will choose a topic and then be grouped by common research interests.

Association for Computers and the Humanities The annual Digital Humanities conference is an opportunity for the ACH to pursue in-person many of the initiatives that we support more virtually during the year. We hope you’ll be able to join us for some or all of our events at DH2013 in Nebraska! ACH Annual General Meeting, Jobs Slam, and Pedagogy Lightning Talks Sure, there may be some sub-committee reports and even an important vote or two, but you haven’t really experienced an annual general meeting until you’ve been to an ACH Jobs Slam! Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting the Past on the Web This book provides a plainspoken and thorough introduction to the web for historians—teachers and students, archivists and museum curators, professors as well as amateur enthusiasts—who wish to produce online historical work, or to build upon and improve the projects they have already started in this important new medium. It begins with an overview of the different genres of history websites, surveying a range of digital history work that has been created since the beginning of the web. The book then takes the reader step-by-step through planning a project, understanding the technologies involved and how to choose the appropriate ones, designing a site that is both easy-to-use and scholarly, digitizing materials in a way that makes them web-friendly while preserving their historical integrity, and how to reach and respond to an intended audience effectively. On this website, we present a free online version of the text. , Barnes and Noble, or U. of Penn. Press.

The Digital Essay « timhodson.com If you haven’t seen it already, you should have a look at this Digital Essay by Will Self. Not because you are a fan of Will Self or necessarily interested in Kafka’s Wound, but because you are interested in the way the essay can be brought to life through embedded references. I spent a good portion of a very interesting hackday at the National Archives in March, Talking to Helen Jeffrey from the London Review of Books. We talked about Linked Data and how these concepts when applied to something like an essay might make it a different experience. In the outcome of the hackday, I used a graph to illustrate the connections between letter writers in the ancient correspondence of Henry III (and others) between 1175-1538. Connections between people and graphs are natural bedfellows.

The Alliance for Networking Visual Culture » Updates Announcing Our Summer Schedule of Scalar Webinars April 17, 2014 The Scalar development team will be offering a series of free online webinars this summer. Our “Introduction to Scalar” webinars will cover basic features of the platform: a review of existing Scalar books and a hands-on introduction to paths, tags, annotations and importing media. Our “Intermediate Scalar” webinars will delve into more advanced topics including the effective use of visualizations, annotating with media and a primer on customizing appearances in Scalar. Our summer schedule will include four dates:

The Future of Archives in a Digital Age Scholarship and teaching in the humanities are undergoing a seismic shift, from a culture once based almost entirely on in-person and printed exchange to one reliant on a combination of traditional communications and digital technologies. It is a time of excitement for many and of skepticism for others. What does it mean that for many the most used "libraries" have become "digital"? What are the implications for the development of knowledge at a time when vast amounts of data have not been made available in digital formats?

10 Fun Tools To Easily Make Your Own Infographics People love to learn by examining visual representations of data. That’s been proven time and time again by the popularity of both infographics and Pinterest. So what if you could make your own infographics ? What would you make it of? It’s actually easier than you think… even if you have zero design skills whatsoever. Below are my two favorite infographic-making web 2.0 tools that I highly recommend. Agostino Steffani An 1816 lithography of Agostino Steffani from an unknown original. Beginning from the autograph of the Duetto da camera Pria ch'io faccia by Agostino Steffani. Agostino Steffani (25 July 1654 – 12 February 1728) was an Italian ecclesiastic, diplomat and composer. Biography[edit]

Digital Humanities Humanities Day 2012: Digital Humanities Forum by UChicago 449 views How is the digital changing the way that humanities scholars look at the past?

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