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Dvaraka Giant Underwater City found in India 1

Related:  IndiaAncient Civilisations

Angkor Wat, Cambodia Stegosaurus Figure, Angkor Wat, Cambodia Megaliths Discovered in Southern Siberia, Russia A series of incredible photographs have been released by Dr Valery Uvarov, Head of the Department of Palaeoscience, Palaeotechnology, and UFO Research of the National Security Academy of Russia, following an expedition to the mountains of Gornaya Shoria in Southern Siberia. The photographs appear to depict a set of enormous megaliths and Dr Uvarov is convinced they are man-made structures. Others, however, have argued that they are simple a rare example of the power and wonder of Mother Nature. An expedition headed by Georgy Sidorov was undertaken a team of 19 researchers following information about the existence of a large number of strange megalithic objects on Gornaya Shoria, a mountain reaching 1,100 metres above sea level, and situated in a remote part of Russia which had previously been blocked off by checkpoints during the era of the Soviet Union. The site of the ‘megalith’ stone blocks. The large blocks appear to be stacked on top of each other. By April Holloway

Arkaim: Russia's Stonehenge and a Puzzle of the Ancient World Everyone’s heard of Stonehenge. You could probably venture into the Amazonian jungle and seek out an untouched tribe of hunter-gatherers, spend months gaining their trust and learning their language, fighting off dysentery while you’re at it, and when their chief finally makes you an honorary member of their society, against the emphatic advice of his shaman, you could ask them if they’ve heard of Stonehenge, and the answer would probably be: yes. Some might say that’s overstating the matter a touch, but the point stands. The sarsen stones of Wiltshire are famous; they’ve made their way into popular culture the world over. Though, would it surprise you to know that Stonehenge isn’t the only megalithic stone circle in the world? Probably not, but most don’t realise that there are somewhere on the order of 5000 stone circles around the world. Great Britain boasts a large number of these Neolithic sites, but they don’t have a monopoly on henges, as they’re called over there.

Hypogeum of Hal Saflieni, Malta Lady of Maali, New Guinea Musicovery Pythagorean cup - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Cross section Cross section of a Pythagorean cup. A Pythagorean cup (also known as a Pythagoras cup, a Greedy Cup or a Tantalus cup) is a form of drinking cup that forces its user to imbibe only in moderation. Credited to Pythagoras of Samos, it allows the user to fill the cup with wine up to a certain level. If he fills the cup only to that level, the imbiber may enjoy a drink in peace. If he exhibits gluttony, however, the cup spills its entire contents out of the bottom (onto the lap of the immodest drinker).[1] Form and function[edit] A Pythagorean cup looks like a normal drinking cup, except that the bowl has a central column in it – giving it a shape like a Bundt pan in the center of the cup. When the cup is filled, liquid rises through the second pipe up to the chamber at the top of the central column, following Pascal's principle of communicating vessels. Common occurrences[edit] A Pythagorean cup sold in Crete A Pythagorean cup sold in Samos See also[edit] References[edit]

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